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  1. Perceptions on Social Responsibility: The Entrepreneurial Vision.Robin Peterson & Minjoon Jun - 2009 - Business and Society 48 (3):385-405.
    This article outlines the results of an inquiry into the nature of entrepreneurial commitment to social responsibility as a business philosophy. Findings show that the respondents, as a group, reported a strong orientation to this view. Several social responsibility topics emerge in a position of special prominence to entrepreneurs, and their preferences for these topics do not widely vary. Furthermore, the degree of attachment to social responsibility, as an operational construct, correlates with several demographic and psychographic dimensions.
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  • Successful U.S. Entrepreneurs: Identifying Ethical Decision-Making and Social Responsibility Behaviors.Dinah Payne & Brenda E. Joyner - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):203-217.
    This two-part study analyzed some of the ethical choices made by founding entrepreneurs during the creation and development of their ventures in order to identify the areas in which founding entrepreneurs must make decisions related to ethics or social responsibility during venture creation and development. Content analysis was used to identify decisions with ethical components and/or implications from in-depth interviews with 10 successful business founders. The research for part one of the study was guided by the following research question: In (...)
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  • Ethics Through an Entrepreneurial Lens: Theory and Observation. [REVIEW]Emeric Solymossy & John Masters - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (3):227 - 241.
    Recent work in the fields of ethics and entrepreneurship has raised the possibility that entrepreneurs may differ from other individuals in the moral issues they face, in their moral judgements and behaviors concerning those issues, and even in their level of cognitive moral development. While this work has been exploratory and its conclusions tentative, the findings raise two interesting questions: do entrepreneurs actually differ from non-entrepreneurs in their ethical orientations and, if so, why? We propose a model of ethical decision (...)
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  • Understanding Purchase Intention During Product-Harm Crises: Moderating Effects of Perceived Corporate Ability and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu-Chuan Chen, Chou-Kang Chiu & Wan-Yu Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):455-471.
    A company’s product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e.g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study’s proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative publicity (...)
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  • The Impact of Technological Turbulence on Entrepreneurial Behavior, Social Norms and Ethics: Three Internet-Based Cases.Jeremy Hall & Philip Rosson - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):231-248.
    We investigate the entrepreneurial opportunities and ethical dilemmas presented by technological turbulence. More specifically we investigate the line between Baumol’s [J. Polit. Econ. 98 (1990) 893] productive (e.g. innovation), unproductive (e.g. rent seeking) and destructive (e.g. criminal) entrepreneurship through three examples of Internet innovation – spam (destructive), music file sharing (unproductive), and Internet pharmacies (potentially productive). The emergence of accessible Internet technologies, under present norms, has created the potential for all three entrepreneurial activities. Because of the propensity for self-serving biases (...)
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  • Doing Right Leads to Doing Well: When the Type of CSR and Reputation Interact to Affect Consumer Evaluations of the Firm. [REVIEW]Yuan-Shuh Lii & Monle Lee - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):69-81.
    This study investigates the efficacy of three corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives—sponsorship, cause-related marketing (CRM), and philanthropy—on consumer–company identification (C–C identification) and brand attitude and, in turn, consumer citizenship behaviors. CSR reputation is proposed as the moderating variable that affects the relationship between CSR initiatives, C–C identification, and brand attitude. A conceptual model that integrates the hypothesized relationships and the moderating effect of CSR reputation is used to frame the study. Using a between-subjects factorial designed experiment, the results showed that (...)
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  • Innovations, Stakeholders & Entrepreneurship.Nicholas Dew & Saras D. Sarasvathy - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):267-283.
    In modern societies entrepreneurship and innovation are widely seen as key sources of economic growth and welfare increases. Yet entrepreneurial innovation has also meant losses and hardships for some members of society: it is destructive of some stakeholders’ wellbeing even as it creates new wellbeing among other stakeholders. Both the positive benefits and negative externalities of innovation are problematic because entrepreneurs initiate new ventures before their private profitability and/or social costs can be fully recognized. In this paper we consider three (...)
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  • Moral Reasoning Skills: Are Entrepreneurs Different? [REVIEW]Elisabeth J. Teal & Archie B. Carroll - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 19 (3):229 - 240.
    Drawing on existing theory in the fields of business ethics, entrepreneurship, and psychology, this research provides an initial empirical exploration of whether entrepreneurs use cognitive reasoning processes which reflect a higher level of moral development than the level of moral development that has been empirically observed either in middle-level managers or in the general adult population. The Defining Issues Test was used to measure the level of moral reasoning skill of the entrepreneurs in this study. Although the study was limited (...)
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  • Entrepreneurship and Ethics: A Literature Review. [REVIEW]Francis T. Hannafey - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):99 - 110.
    During the past twenty years, there has been an explosion of new interest in entrepreneurs and their activities. Yet only recently has serious research attention been devoted to the ethical problems encountered by entrepreneurs and their organizations. Entrepreneurs face uniquely complex moral problems related to basic fairness, personnel and customer relationships, distribution dilemmas, and other challenges. This essay surveys contemporary research in entrepreneurial ethics, examines the kinds of ethical dilemmas entrepreneurs confront, identifies major research topics and methodological approaches, and discusses (...)
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  • Toward the Development of a Multidimensional Scale for Improving Evaluations of Business Ethics.R. E. Reidenbach & D. P. Robin - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (8):639 - 653.
    This study represents an improvement in the ethics scales inventory published in a 1988 Journal of Business Ethics article. The article presents the distillation and validation process whereby the original 33 item inventory was reduced to eight items. These eight items comprise the following ethical dimensions: a moral equity dimension, a relativism dimension, and a contractualism dimension. The multidimensional ethics scale demonstrates significant predictive ability.
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  • Ethical Decision-Making in Corporate Entrepreneurial Organizations.Lewis Long-fung Chau & Wai-sum Siu - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (4):365 - 375.
    No research thus far has attempted to examine ethical decision- making in corporate entrepreneurial organizations. Results of such study would provide management executives with insights on what action, if any, is essential for achieving business ethics and corporate entrepreneurship simultaneously. This paper argues, theoretically, that the work characteristics, organizational characteristics, and some individual characteristics in a corporate entrepreneurial organization are conducive to ethical decisions. These characteristics help mitigate the adverse impact of the turbulent environments on ethical decision- making behavior. Based (...)
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  • Consumers' Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment. [REVIEW]Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237 - 252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers’ commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers’ level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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  • Corporate Entrepreneurs or Rogue Middle Managers? A Framework for Ethical Corporate Entrepreneurship.Kuratko F. Donald & Michael G. Goldsby - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (1):13-30.
    Corporate entrepreneurs -- described in the academic literature as those managers or employees who do not follow the status quo of their co-workers -- are depicted as visionaries who dream of taking the company in new directions. As a result, though, in overcoming internal obstacles to reaching their professional goals they can often walk a fine line between clever resourcefulness and outright rule breaking. A framework is presented as a guideline for middle managers and organizations seeking to impede unethical behaviors (...)
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  • Small-Business Owner-Managers’ Perceptions of Business Ethics and CSR-Related Concepts.Yves Fassin, Annick Rossem & Marc Buelens - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):425-453.
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  • Small-Business Owner-Managers' Perceptions of Business Ethics and CSR-Related Concepts.Yves Fassin, Annick Van Rossem & Marc Buelens - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):425-453.
    Recent academic articles point to an increased vagueness and overlap in concepts related to business ethics and corporate responsibility. Further, the perception of these notions can differ in the smallbusiness world from the original academic definitions. This article focuses on the cognition of small-business owner-managers. Given the impact of small-business owner-managers on their ventures, corporate responsibility and ethical issues can take a different route in SMEs. The small-business owner-manager is able to shape the corporate culture and to enact values other (...)
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  • Consumers’ Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment.Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237-252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers' commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers' level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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  • The Spirit of Entrepreneurship and the Qualities of Moral Decision Making: Toward A Unifying Framework.Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):307-315.
    At the heart of entrepreneurship are imagination, creativity, novelty, and sensitivity. It takes these qualities to develop a new product or service and bring it to market, to envision the possible impacts a new product may make and come up with novel and creative solutions to problems that may arise. These qualities go to make up what could be called the spirit of entrepreneurship, a spirit that involves the ability to handle the experimental nature of entrepreunerial activity. These same qualities (...)
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