Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Effect of Implicit Moral Attitudes on Managerial Decision-Making: An Implicit Social Cognition Approach.Nicki Marquardt & Rainer Hoeger - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):157-171.
    This article concerns itself with the relationship between implicit moral cognitions and decisions in the realm of business ethics. Traditionally, business ethics research emphasized the effects of overt or explicit attitudes on ethical decision-making and neglected intuitive or implicit attitudes. Therefore, based on an implicit social cognition approach it is important to know whether implicit moral attitudes may have a substantial impact on managerial ethical decision-making processes. To test this thesis, a study with 50 participants was conducted. In this study (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Linking Linear/Nonlinear Thinking Style Balance and Managerial Ethical Decision-Making.Kevin Groves, Charles Vance & Yongsun Paik - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):305-325.
    This study presents the results of an empirical analysis of the relationship between managerial thinking style and ethical decision-making. Data from 200 managers across multiple organizations and industries demonstrated that managers predominantly adopt a utilitarian perspective when forming ethical intent across a series of business ethics vignettes. Consistent with expectations, managers utilizing a balanced linear/nonlinear thinking style demonstrated a greater overall willingness to provide ethical decisions across ethics vignettes compared to managers with a predominantly linear thinking style. However, results comparing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Cognitive Unconscious.John F. Kihlstrom - 1987 - Science 237:1445-1452.
  • The Emotional Unconscious.John F. Kihlstrom, Shelagh Mulvaney, Betsy A. Tobias & Irene P. Tobis - 2000 - In Eric Eich, John F. Kihlstrom, Gordon H. Bower, Joseph P. Forgas & Paula M. Niedenthal (eds.), Cognition and Emotion. Oxford University Press. pp. 30-86.
  • A Review of the Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 2004–2011. [REVIEW]Jana L. Craft - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):221-259.
    This review summarizes the research on ethical decision-making from 2004 to 2011. Eighty-four articles were published during this period, resulting in 357 findings. Individual findings are categorized by their application to individual variables, organizational variables, or the concept of moral intensity as developed by Jones :366–395, 1991). Rest’s four-step model for ethical decision-making is used to summarize findings by dependent variable—awareness, intent, judgment, and behavior. A discussion of findings in each category is provided in order to uncover trends in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   114 citations  
  • The Foundation of Moral Reasoning: The Development of the Doctrine of Universal Moral Principles in the Works of Thomas Aquinas and His Predecessors.Anthony Celano - 2013 - Diametros 38:1-61.
    This article considers the development of the idea of universal moral principles in the work of Thomas Aquinas and his predecessors in the thirteenth century. Like other medieval authors who sought to place the principles of moral practice on a foundation more secure than on the choices of the good person, as described by Aristotle, Thomas chooses to introduce a measure of ethical certitude through the concept of the innate habit of synderesis. This idea, introduced by Jerome in his commentary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Emotional Dog and Its Rational Tail: A Social Intuitionist Approach to Moral Judgment.Jonathan Haidt - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):814-834.
    Research on moral judgment has been dominated by rationalist models, in which moral judgment is thought to be caused by moral reasoning. The author gives 4 reasons for considering the hypothesis that moral reasoning does not cause moral judgment; rather, moral reasoning is usually a post hoc construction, generated after a judgment has been reached. The social intuitionist model is presented as an alternative to rationalist models. The model is a social model in that it deemphasizes the private reasoning done (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1168 citations  
  • Re-Thinking Capitalism: What We Can Learn From Scholasticism?Domènec Melé - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):293-304.
    The macro-level business ethics in Scholasticism contrasts with modern Anglo-Saxon Capitalism, which is very influential worldwide. Scholasticism, developed between the thirteenth and the mid-seventeenth centuries, deals with key elements of free market morality, including private property, contracts, profits, prices, and free competition. For over 500 years Scholasticism tried to understand economic phenomena and business activities and reflected on them from an ethical perspective. Scholasticism offered the crucial lesson of the centrality of justice and the role of practical wisdom in considering (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Ethical Judgment and Radical Business Changes: The Role of Entrepreneurial Perspicacity.Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini & Cristiano Ciappei - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):769-788.
    This study examines the implications of practical reason for entrepreneurial activities. Our study is based on Thomas Aquinas’ interpretation of such virtue, with a particular focus on the partition of practical reason in potential parts such as synesis, or common sense, and gnome, or perspicacity. Since entrepreneurial acts and actions deal with extremely uncertain situations, we argue that only this perspicacity, as the ability of correctly judging in exceptional cases, has the power to find wisdom under such blurred conditions. Perspicacity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Antecedents of Moral Imagination in the Workplace: A Social Cognitive Theory Perspective. [REVIEW]Brian G. Whitaker & Lindsey N. Godwin - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):61-73.
    As corporate scandals proliferate, organizational researchers and practitioners have made calls for research providing guidance for those wishing to influence positive moral decision-making and behavior in the workplace. This study incorporates social cognitive theory and a vignette-based cognitive measure for moral imagination to examine (a) moral attentiveness and employee creativity as important antecedents of moral imagination and (b) creativity as a moderator of the positive relationship between moral attentiveness and moral imagination. Based on the results from supervisor–subordinate dyadic data (N (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Thomas Aquinas on Justice as a Global Virtue in Business.Claus Dierksmeier & Anthony Celano - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):247-272.
    Today’s globalized economy cannot be governed by legal strictures alone. A combination of self-interest and regulation is not enough to avoid the recurrence of its systemic crises. We also need virtues and a sense of corporate responsibility in order to assure the sustained success of the global economy. Yet whose virtues shall prevail in a pluralistic world? The moral theory of Thomas Aquinas meets the present need for a business ethics that transcends the legal realm by linking the ideas of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Ethical Blindness.Guido Palazzo, Franciska Krings & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):323-338.
    Many models of (un)ethical decision making assume that people decide rationally and are in principle able to evaluate their decisions from a moral point of view. However, people might behave unethically without being aware of it. They are ethically blind. Adopting a sensemaking approach, we argue that ethical blindness results from a complex interplay between individual sensemaking activities and context factors.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Conceptualization and Measurement of Virtuous Leadership: Doing Well by Doing Good.Gordon Wang & Rick D. Hackett - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):321-345.
    Despite a long history in eastern and western culture of defining leadership in terms of virtues and character, their significance for guiding leader behavior has largely been confined to the ethics literature. As such, agreement concerning the defining elements of virtuous leadership and their measurement is lacking. Drawing on both Confucian and Aristotelian concepts, we define virtuous leadership and distinguish it conceptually from several related perspectives, including virtues-based leadership in the Positive organizational behavior literature, and from ethical and value-laden leadership. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Advancing the Rationality Debate.Keith E. Stanovich & Richard F. West - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):701-717.
    In this response, we clarify several misunderstandings of the understanding/acceptance principle and defend our specific operationalization of that principle. We reiterate the importance of addressing the problem of rational task construal and we elaborate the notion of computational limitations contained in our target article. Our concept of thinking dispositions as variable intentional-level styles of epistemic and behavioral regulation is explained, as is its relation to the rationality debate. Many of the suggestions of the commentators for elaborating two-process models are easily (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Synderesis in Late Medieval Philosophy and the Wittenberg Reformers.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):881-901.
    The present article discusses the concept of synderesis in the late medieval universities of Erfurt and Leipzig and the later developments in Wittenberg. The comparison between Bartholomaeus Arnoldi of Usingen in Erfurt and Johannes Peyligk in Leipzig shows that school traditions played an important role in the exposition of synderesis by the late medieval scholastic natural philosophers. However, Jodocus Trutfetter's example warns against overemphasizing the importance of the school traditions and reminds us of the manifold history of medieval discussions on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A Role for Virtue Ethics in the Analysis of Business Practice.Daryl Koehn - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):533-539.
    This article explores differences in the ways in which utilitarian, deontological and virtue/aretic ethics treat of act, outcome, and agent. I argue that virtue ethics offers important and distinctive insights into business practice, insights overlooked by utilitarian and deontological ethics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  • An Emotion-Based Model of Salesperson Ethical Behaviors.Raj Agnihotri, Adam Rapp, Prabakar Kothandaraman & Rakesh K. Singh - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):243-257.
    Academic research studies examining the ethical attitudes and behaviors of salespeople have produced several frameworks that explore the ethical decision-making processes to which salespeople adhere when faced with ethical dilemmas. Past literature enriches our understanding; however, a critical review of the relevant literature suggests that an emotional route to salesperson ethical decision-making has yet to be explored. Given the fact that individuals’ emotional capacities play an important role in decision-making when faced with an ethical dilemma, there is a need for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Impact of Moral Emotions on Cause-Related Marketing Campaigns: A Cross-Cultural Examination.Jae-Eun Kim & Kim K. P. Johnson - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):79-90.
    This research was focused on investigating why some consumers might support cause-related marketing campaigns for reasons other than personal benefit by examining the influence of moral emotions and cultural orientation. The authors investigated the extent to which moral emotions operate differently across a cultural variable (US versus Korea) and an individual difference variable (self-construal). A survey method was utilised. Data were collected from a convenience sample of US ( n = 180) and Korean ( n = 191) undergraduates. Moral emotions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • In Search of Virtue: The Role of Virtues, Values and Character Strengths in Ethical Decision Making.Mary Crossan, Daina Mazutis & Gerard Seijts - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (4):567-581.
    We present a comprehensive model that integrates virtues, values, character strengths and ethical decision making (EDM). We describe how a largely consequentialist ethical framework has dominated most EDM scholarship to date. We suggest that reintroducing a virtue ethical perspective to existing EDM theories can help to illustrate deficiencies in existing decision-making models, and suggest that character strengths and motivational values can serve as natural bridges that link a virtue framework to EDM in organizations. In conjunction with the more fully formulated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • The Role of Four Universal Moral Competencies in Ethical Decision-Making.Rafael Morales-Sánchez & Carmen Cabello-Medina - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):717-734.
    Current frameworks on ethical decision-making process have some limitations. This paper argues that the consideration of moral competencies, understood as moral virtues in the workplace, can enhance our understanding of why moral character contributes to ethical decision-making. After discussing the universal nature of four moral competencies (prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance), we analyse their influence on the various stages of the ethical decision-making process. We conclude by considering the managerial implications of our findings and proposing further research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Managing Ethically Cultural Diversity: Learning From Thomas Aquinas.João César das Neves & Domènec Melé - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):769-780.
    Cultural diversity is an inescapable reality and a concern in many businesses where it can often raise ethical questions and dilemmas. This paper aims to offer suggestions to certain problems facing managers in dealing with cultural diversity through the inspiration of Thomas Aquinas. Although he may be perceived as a voice from the distant past, we can still find in his writings helpful and original ideas and criteria. He welcomes cultural differences as a part of the perfection of the universe. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • A Model for Ethical Decision Making in Business: Reasoning, Intuition, and Rational Moral Principles. [REVIEW]Jaana Woiceshyn - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):311-323.
    How do business leaders make ethical decisions? Given the significant and wide-spread impact of business people’s decisions on multiple constituents, how they make decisions matters. Unethical decisions harm the decision makers themselves as well as others, whereas ethical decisions have the opposite effect. Based on data from a study on strategic decision making by 16 effective chief executive officers, I propose a model for ethical decision making in business in which reasoning and intuition interact through forming, recalling, and applying moral (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Humanizing Business Through Emotions: On the Role of Emotions in Ethics. [REVIEW]Yotam Lurie - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):1-11.
    Emotions have not received sufficient attention in business ethics. This paper identifies the positive role of emotions in human judgment and attitudes. It then argues that emotions as well as feelings on the part of managers and their employees can be positive forces for both business managers and for the organizations they lead. Allowing emotions a stronger role in business affairs could serve in putting a more human face on both managers and their organizations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Ethical Principles for Decision Makers: A Longitudinal Survey. [REVIEW]Phillip V. Lewis - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (4):271 - 278.
    This paper is based on a five-year study of the ethical principles considered by executives, middle managers, and students as appropriate guidelines for making decisions. Out of the fourteen principles surveyed, nine seem to be standards that can be applied with no further thought or research required by the decision maker. The other six principles may suggest decisions makers need clearer guidelines as to what to do or what not to do when faced with an ethical dilemma that exists outside (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375-413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   291 citations  
  • A Comparison of Five Business Philosophies.Paul Miesing & John F. Preble - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (6):465 - 476.
    While the media and public opinion polls suggest that the state of business ethics is declining, surveys of corporate managers on the subject are less than conclusive. This study presents results of a survey of 487 adult, MBA, and undergraduate business students on the business philosophies of Machiavellianism, Darwinism, Objectivism, Relativism, and Universalism. The findings were consistent with earlier research which showed prospective managers to be less ethical than practicing ones and that women and those reporting a strong religious conviction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Ethical Decision Making: A Review of the Empirical Literature. [REVIEW]Robert C. Ford & Woodrow D. Richardson - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (3):205 - 221.
    The authors review the empirical literature in order to assess which variables are postulated as influencing ethical beliefs and decision making. The variables are divided into those unique to the individual decision maker and those considered situational in nature. Variables related to an individual decision maker examined in this review are nationality, religion, sex, age, education, employment, and personality. Situation specific variables examined in this review are referent groups, rewards and sanctions, codes of conduct, type of ethical conflict, organization effects, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   242 citations  
  • Socialization of Business Practitioners: Learning to Reflect on Current Business Practices. [REVIEW]Michael W. Small & Joy L. Cullen - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (8):695 - 701.
    An approach to ethical coursework in business schools which draws upon Schon''s concept of the reflective practitioner is described. It is argued that an approach which promotes reflective practice guards against the dualism in models of ethical decision making which oppose philosophical and psychological perspectives. Workshop activities which can be used to facilitate students'' ability to reflect on ethical situations are discussed. In particular, the critical incident technique encourages students to analyse strategies they have used to cope with ethical dilemmas (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Spirit of Entrepreneurship and the Qualities of Moral Decision Making: Toward A Unifying Framework.Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):307-315.
    At the heart of entrepreneurship are imagination, creativity, novelty, and sensitivity. It takes these qualities to develop a new product or service and bring it to market, to envision the possible impacts a new product may make and come up with novel and creative solutions to problems that may arise. These qualities go to make up what could be called the spirit of entrepreneurship, a spirit that involves the ability to handle the experimental nature of entrepreunerial activity. These same qualities (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Ethical Education in Accounting: Integrating Rules, Values and Virtues. [REVIEW]Domènec Melé - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (1):97 - 109.
    Ethics in accounting and ethical education have seen an increase in interest in the last decade. However, despite the renewed interest some important shortcomings persist. Generally, rules, principles, values and virtues are presented in a fragmented fashion. In addition, only a few authors consider the role of the accountants character in presenting relevant and truthful information in financial reporting and the importance of practical reasoning in accounting. This article holds that rules, values and virtues are interconnected. This provides a sound (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • The Role of Virtues in the Framing of Decisions.Miquel Bastons - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):389-400.
    This article explores links between the modern theory of rational choice and ethics. Ethics allows us to answer an unsolved question in modern decision theory: the structuring problem in decisions. Such a problem cannot be solved coming from the principle of expected utility. This principle can solve the problem of ‚choosing’ among given alternatives, but does not establish which alternatives should be taken into account in decision. In order to understand the structuring problem, the act of ‚choosing’ has to be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Modernism, Christianity, and Business Ethics: A Worldview Perspective.David Kim, Dan Fisher & David McCalman - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):115-121.
    Despite growing interest in examining the role of religion in business ethics, there is little consensus concerning the basis or standards of “good” or ethical behavior and the reasons behind them. This limits our ability to enhance ethical behavior in the workplace. We address this issue by examining worldviews as it relates to ethics research and practice. Our worldview forms the context within which we organize and build our understanding of reality. Given that much of our academic work as well (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Emotion and Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations.Alice Gaudine & Linda Thorne - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):175 - 187.
    While the influence of emotion on individuals'' ethical decisions has been identified by numerous researchers, little is known about how emotions influence individuals'' ethical decision process. Thus, it is not clear whether different emotions promote and/or discourage ethical decision-making in the workplace. To address this gap, this paper develops a model that illustrates how emotion affects the components of individuals'' ethical decision-making process. The model is developed by integrating research findings that consider the two dimensions of emotion, arousal and feeling (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • The Emotional Dog Does Learn New Tricks: A Reply to Pizarro and Bloom.Jonathan Haidt - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):197-198.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   300 citations  
  • Instinct of Nature: Natural Law, Synderesis, and the Moral Sense.Robert A. Greene - 1997 - Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (2):173-198.
  • The Spark of Conscience: Bonaventure's View of Conscience and Synderesis.Douglas Langston - 1993 - Franciscan Studies 53 (1):79-95.
  • Intuition, Analysis and Reflection in Business Ethics.Chris Provis - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):5-15.
    The paper aim draws together two ideas that have figured in different strands of discussion in business ethics: the ideas of intuition and of reflection. They are considered in company with the third, complementary, idea of analysis. It is argued that the interplay amongst these is very important in business ethics. The relationship amongst the three ideas can be understood by reference to parts of modern cognitive psychology, including dual-process theory and the Social Intuitionist Model. Intuition can be misleading when (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Synderesis, the Spark of Conscience, in the English Renaissance.Robert A. Greene - 1991 - Journal of the History of Ideas 52 (2):195-219.
  • Aquinas and Emotional Theory Today: Mind-Body, Cognitivism and Connaturality.Patrick Gorevan - 2000 - Acta Philosophica 9 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Role of Conscious Reasoning and Intuition in Moral Judgment.Fiery Cushman, Liane Young & Marc Hauser - 2006 - Psychological Science 17 (12):1082-1089.
    ��Is moral judgment accomplished by intuition or conscious reasoning? An answer demands a detailed account of the moral principles in question. We investigated three principles that guide moral judgments: (a) Harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by omission, (b) harm intended as the means to a goal is worse than harm foreseen as the side effect of a goal, and (c) harm involving physical contact with the victim is worse than harm involving no physical contact. Asking whether (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   176 citations  
  • A Perspective on Judgment and Choice: Mapping Bounded Rationality.Daniel Kahneman - 2003 - American Psychologist 58 (9):697.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   204 citations  
  • Summary: What's Possible.James R. Rest & Darcia Narvaez - 1994 - In James R. Rest & Darcia Narváez (eds.), Moral Development in the Professions: Psychology and Applied Ethics. L. Erlbaum Associates.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  • A Hot/Cool-System Analysis of Delay of Gratification: Dynamics of Willpower.Janet Metcalfe & Walter Mischel - 1999 - Psychological Review 106 (1):3-19.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  • Intuitive Ethics: How Innately Prepared Intuitions Generate Culturally Variable Virtues.Jonathan Haidt & Craig Joseph - 2004 - Daedalus 133 (4):55-66.
  • Integration of the Cognitive and the Psychodynamic Unconscious.S. Epstein - 1994 - American Psychologist 49 (8):409-24.
  • Scholastic Business Ethics: Thomas Aquinas Versus William of Ockham.Claus Dierksmeier - 2013 - In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. pp. 159--178.
  • Reconciling Situational Social Psychology with Virtue Ethics.Surendra Arjoon - 2008 - International Journal of Management Reviews 10 (3):221-243.
    For the past four decades, debate has occurred in respect of situational social psychology and virtue ethics. This paper attempts to reconcile this debate. Situationists propose a fragmentation theory of character (each person has a whole range of dispositions, each of which has a restricted situational application) and do not subscribe to a regularity theory of character (behaviour is regulated by long-term dispositions). In order to support this view, they cite a number of experiments. It is proposed that the substantive (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations