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  1. The Experimenters' Regress: From Skepticism to Argumentation.Benoı̂t Godin & Yves Gingras - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):133-148.
    Harry Collins' central argument about experimental practice revolves around the thesis that facts can only be generated by good instruments but good instruments can only be recognized as such if they produce facts. This is what Collins calls the experimenters' regress. For Collins, scientific controversies cannot be closed by the ‘facts’ themselves because there are no formal criteria independent of the outcome of the experiment that scientists can apply to decide whether an experimental apparatus works properly or not.No one seems (...)
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  • Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World.Wesley Salmon - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (2):243-257.
     
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  • Philosophy of Logic.Hilary Putnam - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 23 (93):366-367.
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  • The Logic of Scientific Discovery. [REVIEW]K. R. POPPER - 1959 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38:173.
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  • The Essential Tension. Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change.Ian Hacking & Thomas S. Kuhn - 1979 - History and Theory 18 (2):223.
  • The Experimenter's Regress as Philosophical Sociology.H. M. Collins - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):149-156.
    I will divide my discussion into two. In the first part I will discuss Godin and Gingras's delicious claim that the experimenter's regress is anticipated by Sextus Empiricus's formulation of scepticism. In the second part, I will try to deal with Godin and Gingras's ‘critical argument’, that the experimenter's regress would be redundant if we were less concerned with ‘frightening philosophers’.
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  • Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice.C. Bazerman - 1989 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (1):115-118.
  • Objectivity in Experimental Inquiry: Breaking Data-Technique Circles.Sylvia Culp - 1995 - Philosophy of Science 62 (3):438-458.
    I respond to H. M. Collins's claim (1985, 1990, 1993) that experimental inquiry cannot be objective because the only criterium experimentalists have for determining whether a technique is "working" is the production of "correct" (i.e., the expected) data. Collins claims that the "experimenters' regress," the name he gives to this data-technique circle, cannot be broken using the resources of experiment alone. I argue that the data-technique circle, can be broken even though any interpretation of the raw data produced by techniques (...)
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  • Restaging Liebig: A Study in the Replication of Experiments.Melvyn Usselman, Alan Rocke, Christina Reinhart & Kelly Foulser - 2005 - Annals of Science 62 (1):1-55.
    In a publication of 1831 later seen as a milestone in the development of chemistry, Justus Liebig announced a new apparatus for the analysis of organic compounds and provided analytical results for fifteen substances. In this paper we used the detailed descriptions published by Liebig in 1837 to reconstruct his apparatus and methods for hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen analysis. Our replications of his analyses of racemic acid, cinchonine, narcotine, and urea reveal that his two pieces of apparatus give excellent results (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation. [REVIEW]Allan Franklin - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Science 38 (2):241-242.
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  • Selectivity and Discord: Two Problems of Experiment.Allan Franklin - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):344-347.
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  • Representing and Intervening.Ian Hacking - 1987 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 92 (2):279-279.
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  • Reproducibility as a Methodological Imperative in Experimental Research.Michael J. Hones - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:585 - 599.
    A methodological imperative, reproducibility, is proposed for experimental research. This is motivated by recent discussions of normative naturalism as well as the recent interest in the philosophical implications of experimental research. The role of this norm is examined in the context of the routine research procedures in a high-energy scattering experiment. The specific details of the experimental analysis of resonance production in the interaction π +P→ Pπ + π + π - π 0 at 18.5 Ge V/c are discussed in (...)
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  • Laboratory Life. The Social Construction of Scientific Facts.Bruno Latour & Steve Woolgar - 1982 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 13 (1):166-170.
  • Experimental Reproducibility and the Experimenters' Regress.Hans Radder - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:63 - 73.
    In his influential book, "Changing Order", H.M. Collins puts forward the following three claims concerning experimental replication. (i) Replication is rarely practiced by experimentalists; (ii) replication cannot be used as an objective test of scientific knowledge claims, because of the occurrence of the so-called experimenters' regress; and (iii) stopping this regress at some point depends upon the enculturation in a local community of practitioners, who tacitly learn the relevant skills. In my paper I discuss and assess these claims on the (...)
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  • Galileo's Experimental Confirmation of Horizontal Inertia: Unpublished Manuscripts.Stillman Drake - 1973 - Isis 64 (3):291-305.
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  • Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice.H. M. Collins - 1985 - University of Chicago Press.
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we can lever (...)
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  • Can That Be Right? Essays on Experiment, Evidence, and Science.Allan Franklin - 1999
     
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  • Gravity's Shadow: The Search for Gravitational Waves. [REVIEW]Jon Agar - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (4):624-625.
  • Dissecting Trajectories: Galileo's Early Experiments on Projectile Motion and the Law of Fall.David Hill - 1988 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 79:646-668.
  • Science as Practice and Culture.Andrew Pickering (ed.) - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    Science as Practice and Culture explores one of the newest and most controversial developments within the rapidly changing field of science studies: the move toward studying scientific practice--the work of doing science--and the associated move toward studying scientific culture, understood as the field of resources that practice operates in and on. Andrew Pickering has invited leading historians, philosophers, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to prepare original essays for this volume. The essays range over the physical and biological sciences and mathematics, (...)
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