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S. Alexander [118]Peter Alexander [72]Larry Alexander [72]Jeffrey C. Alexander [43]
H. B. Alexander [33]Hartley Burr Alexander [32]H. G. Alexander [27]Thomas M. Alexander [27]

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Profile: Shamas Alexander (University of Manchester)
Profile: Samuel Alexander (Ohio State University)
Profile: Joshua Alexander (Siena College)
Profile: Jeffrey Hugh Alexander (Des Moines Area Community College)
Profile: David J. Alexander (Iowa State University)
Profile: David Alexander (Huntington University)
Profile: David Alexander
Profile: Plamena Alexander (Nottingham University)
Profile: Anna Alexander (Koc University)
Profile: Aharon Alexander (University of Houston)
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  1. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Chad Gonnerman, Cameron Buckner & Joshua Alexander (2010). Are Philosophers Expert Intuiters? Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):331-355.
    Recent experimental philosophy arguments have raised trouble for philosophers' reliance on armchair intuitions. One popular line of response has been the expertise defense: philosophers are highly-trained experts, whereas the subjects in the experimental philosophy studies have generally been ordinary undergraduates, and so there's no reason to think philosophers will make the same mistakes. But this deploys a substantive empirical claim, that philosophers' training indeed inculcates sufficient protection from such mistakes. We canvass the psychological literature on expertise, which indicates that people (...)
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  2. Stacey Swain, Joshua Alexander & Jonathan Weinberg (2008). The Instability of Philosophical Intuitions: Running Hot and Cold on Truetemp. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):138-155.
    A growing body of empirical literature challenges philosophers’ reliance on intuitions as evidence based on the fact that intuitions vary according to factors such as cultural and educational background, and socio-economic status. Our research extends this challenge, investigating Lehrer’s appeal to the Truetemp Case as evidence against reliabilism. We found that intuitions in response to this case vary according to whether, and which, other thought experiments are considered first. Our results show that compared to subjects who receive the Truetemp Case (...)
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  3. Joshua Alexander & Jonathan M. Weinberg (2007). Analytic Epistemology and Experimental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):56–80.
    It has been standard philosophical practice in analytic philosophy to employ intuitions generated in response to thought-experiments as evidence in the evaluation of philosophical claims. In part as a response to this practice, an exciting new movement—experimental philosophy—has recently emerged. This movement is unified behind both a common methodology and a common aim: the application of methods of experimental psychology to the study of the nature of intuitions. In this paper, we will introduce two different views concerning the relationship that (...)
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  4. S. Matthew Liao, Alex Wiegmann, Joshua Alexander & Gerard Vong (2012). Putting the Trolley in Order: Experimental Philosophy and the Loop Case. Philosophical Psychology 25 (5):661-671.
    In recent years, a number of philosophers have conducted empirical studies that survey people's intuitions about various subject matters in philosophy. Some have found that intuitions vary accordingly to seemingly irrelevant facts: facts about who is considering the hypothetical case, the presence or absence of certain kinds of content, or the context in which the hypothetical case is being considered. Our research applies this experimental philosophical methodology to Judith Jarvis Thomson's famous Loop Case, which she used to call into question (...)
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  5.  3
    Michelle Alexander & Cornel West (2012). The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. The New Press.
    This book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control---relegating millions to a permanent second-class status---even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness.
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  6. Garrett E. Alexander, Mahlon R. DeLong & Michael D. Crutcher (1992). Do Cortical and Basal Ganglionic Motor Areas Use “Motor Programs” to Control Movement? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):656-665.
     
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  7. Joshua Alexander, Ronald Mallon & Jonathan M. Weinberg (2010). Accentuate the Negative. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):297-314.
    Our interest in this paper is to drive a wedge of contention between two different programs that fall under the umbrella of “experimental philosophy”. In particular, we argue that experimental philosophy’s “negative program” presents almost as significant a challenge to its “positive program” as it does to more traditional analytic philosophy.
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  8. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). Cultural Pragmatics: Social Performance Between Ritual and Strategy. Sociological Theory 22 (4):527-573.
    From its very beginnings, the social study of culture has been polarized between structuralist theories that treat meaning as a text and investigate the patterning that provides relative autonomy and pragmatist theories that treat meaning as emerging from the contingencies of individual and collective action-so-called practices-and that analyze cultural patterns as reflections of power and material interest. In this article, I present a theory of cultural pragmatics that transcends this division, bringing meaning structures, contingency, power, and materiality together in a (...)
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  9.  61
    William H. Alexander & Joshua W. Brown (2010). Computational Models of Performance Monitoring and Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):658-677.
    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been the subject of intense interest as a locus of cognitive control. Several computational models have been proposed to account for a range of effects, including error detection, conflict monitoring, error likelihood prediction, and numerous other effects observed with single-unit neurophysiology, fMRI, and lesion studies. Here, we review the state of computational models of cognitive control and offer a new theoretical synthesis of the mPFC as signaling response–outcome predictions. This new synthesis has two interacting (...)
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  10.  15
    M. Jacqui Alexander & Chandra Talpade Mohanty (eds.) (1996). Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures. Routledge.
    Feminist Geneaologies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures provides a feminist anaylsis of the questions of sexual and gender politics, economic and cultural marginality, and anti-racist and anti-colonial practices both in the "West" and in the "Third World." This collection, edited by Jacqui Alexander and Chandra Talpade Mohanty, charts the underlying theoretical perspectives and organization practices of the different varieties of feminism that take on questions of colonialism, imperialism, and the repressive rule of colonial, post-colonial and advanced capitalist nation-states. It provides a (...)
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  11. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2001). Theorizing the "Modes of Incorporation": Assimilation, Hyphenation, and Multiculturalism as Varieties of Civil Participation. Sociological Theory 19 (3):237-249.
  12. Jason McKenzie Alexander, Johannes Himmelreich & Christopher Thompson (2015). Epistemic Landscapes, Optimal Search, and the Division of Cognitive Labor. Philosophy of Science 82 (3):424-453,.
    This article examines two questions about scientists’ search for knowledge. First, which search strategies generate discoveries effectively? Second, is it advantageous to diversify search strategies? We argue pace Weisberg and Muldoon, “Epistemic Landscapes and the Division of Cognitive Labor”, that, on the first question, a search strategy that deliberately seeks novel research approaches need not be optimal. On the second question, we argue they have not shown epistemic reasons exist for the division of cognitive labor, identifying the errors that led (...)
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  13.  29
    Richard D. Alexander (1985). A Biological Interpretation of Moral Systems. Zygon 20 (1):3-20.
    . Moral systems are described as systems of indirect reciprocity, existing because of histories of conflicts of interest and arising as outcomes of the complexity of social interactions in groups of long‐lived individuals with varying conflicts and confluences of interest and indefinitely iterated social interactions. Although morality is commonly defined as involving justice for all people, or consistency in the social treatment of all humans, it may have arisen for immoral reasons, as a force leading to cohesiveness within human groups (...)
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  14. George Sun, John Howie, Thomas Alexander, Kenneth Stikkers & Randall Auxier (2006). Remembering Lewis E. Hahn. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):1-15.
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  15.  72
    Jeffrey C. Alexander & Philip Smith (1993). The Discourse of American Civil Society: A New Proposal for Cultural Studies. Theory and Society 22 (2):151-207.
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  16.  16
    Rachel M. Werner, G. Caleb Alexander, Angela Fagerlin & Peter A. Ubel (2004). Lying to Insurance Companies: The Desire to Deceive Among Physicians and the Public. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):53-59.
    This study examines the public's and physicians' willingness to support deception of insurance companies in order to obtain necessary healthcare services and how this support varies based on perceptions of physicians' time pressures. Based on surveys of 700 prospective jurors and 1617 physicians, the public was more than twice as likely as physicians to sanction deception (26% versus 11%) and half as likely to believe that physicians have adequate time to appeal coverage decisions (22% versus 59%). The odds of public (...)
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  17.  20
    Reutlinger Alexander & Andersen Holly (forthcoming). Abstract Versus Causal Explanations? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
    In the recent literature on causal and non-causal scientific explanations, there is an intuitive assumption (which we call the ‘abstractness assumption’) according to which an explanation is non-causal by virtue of being abstract. In this context, to be “abstract” means that the explanans in question leaves out many or almost all causal microphysical details of the target system. After motivating this assumption, we argue that the abstractness assumption, in placing the abstract and the causal character of an explanation in tension, (...)
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  18. William Alexander, Keith Anderson, Jane Harris, Julian Ingram, Tom Nelson, Katherine Woods & Judy Svensen, On Good and Bad: Whether Happiness is the Highest Good.
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  19.  60
    Joshua Alexander (2012). Experimental Philosophy: An Introduction. Polity.
    Experimental philosophy uses experimental research methods from psychology and cognitive science in order to investigate both philosophical and metaphilosophical questions. It explores philosophical questions about the nature of the psychological world - the very structure or meaning of our concepts of things, and about the nature of the non-psychological world - the things themselves. It also explores metaphilosophical questions about the nature of philosophical inquiry and its proper methodology. This book provides a detailed and provocative introduction to this innovative field, (...)
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  20.  69
    Jonathan M. Weinberg, Joshua Alexander, Chad Gonnerman & Shane Reuter (2013). Restrictionism and Reflection. The Monist 95 (2):200-222.
    It has become increasingly popular to respond to experimental philosophy by suggesting that experimental philosophers haven’t been studying the right kind of thing. One version of this kind of response, which we call the reflection defense, involves suggesting both that philosophers are interested only in intuitions that are the product of careful reflection on the details of hypothetical cases and the key concepts involved in those cases, and that these kinds of philosophical intuitions haven’t yet been adequately studied by experimental (...)
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  21. Hanan A. Alexander (2006). A View From Somewhere: Explaining the Paradigms of Educational Research. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):205–221.
    In this paper I ask how educational researchers can believe the subjective perceptions of qualitative participant-observers given the concern for objectivity and generalisability of experimental research in the behavioural and social sciences. I critique the most common answer to this question within the educational research community, which posits the existence of two (or more) equally legitimate epistemological paradigms—positivism and constructivism—and offer an alternative that places a priority in educational research on understanding the purposes and meanings humans attribute to educational practices. (...)
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  22.  70
    Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). “Moore or Less” Causation and Responsibility. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (1):81-92.
  23. J. McKenzie Alexander, Cheap Talk, Reinforcement Learning and the Emergence of Cooperation.
    Cheap talk has often been thought incapable of supporting the emergence of cooperation because costless signals, easily faked, are unlikely to be reliable. I show how, in a social network model of cheap talk with reinforcement learning, cheap talk does enable the emergence of cooperation, provided that individuals also temporally discount the past. This establishes one mechanism that suffices for moving a population of initially uncooperative individuals to a state of mutually beneficial cooperation even in the absence of formal institutions.
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  24.  18
    Elizabeth C. Alexander (2002). Consumer Reactions to Unethical Service Recovery. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):223 - 237.
    Ethical business practices have been widely prescribed, but why? Consumers views on unethical business practices have been studied, but possibly more important to marketers and researchers are consumer actions and reactions to unethical business practices and the businesses themselves. Do consumers react negatively, or in such a way as to "punish" the unethical business? If so, what is the nature and extent of the punishment? This research seeks answers to these questions by examining consumer reactions, such as complaining and switching, (...)
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  25. H. Deschamps & S. Alexander (1962). Toward a History of Africa. Diogenes 10 (37):105-114.
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  26. Keith Anderson, Katherine Woods, William Alexander, Julian Ingram & Mark Johnson, Characters of the Dialogue.
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RECORDER'S PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
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  27. Peter Vanderschraaf & J. McKenzie Alexander (2005). Follow the Leader: Local Interactions with Influence Neighborhoods. Philosophy of Science 72 (1):86-113.
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  28.  13
    Prescott Alexander, Alexander Schlegel, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina L. Roskies, Thalia Wheatley & Peter Ulric Tse (2016). Readiness Potentials Driven by Non-Motoric Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 39:38-47.
  29. Darrell P. Rowbottom & R. McNeill Alexander (2012). The Role of Hypotheses in Biomechanical Research. Science in Context 25 (2):247-262.
    This paper investigates whether there is a discrepancy between the stated and actual aims in biomechanical research, particularly with respect to hypothesis testing. We present an analysis of one hundred papers recently published in The Journal of Experimental Biology and Journal of Biomechanics, and examine the prevalence of papers which (a) have hypothesis testing as a stated aim, (b) contain hypothesis testing claims that appear to be purely presentational (i.e. which seem not to have influenced the actual study), and (c) (...)
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  30. David J. Alexander (2013). The Problem of Respecting Higher-Order Doubt. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (18).
    This paper argues that higher-order doubt generates an epistemic dilemma. One has a higher-order doubt with regards to P insofar as one justifiably withholds belief as to what attitude towards P is justified. That is, one justifiably withholds belief as to whether one is justified in believing, disbelieving, or withholding belief in P. Using the resources provided by Richard Feldman’s recent discussion of how to respect one’s evidence, I argue that if one has a higher-order doubt with regards to P, (...)
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  31. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2010). Marxism and the Spirit of Socialism: Cultural Origins of Anti-Capitalism (1982). Thesis Eleven 100 (1):84-105.
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  32. Jason Alexander & Brian Skyrms (1999). Bargaining with Neighbors: Is Justice Contagious? Journal of Philosophy 96 (11):588-598.
  33. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1995). Fin de Siáecle Social Theory Relativism, Reduction, and the Problem of Reason.
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  34. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2010). The 'Marxism Project' in The History of Its Times. Thesis Eleven 100 (1):81-83.
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  35.  88
    Peter Alexander (1985). Ideas, Qualities, and Corpuscles: Locke and Boyle on the External World. Cambridge University Press.
    This study presents a substantial and often radical reinterpretation of some of the central themes of Locke's thought. Professor Alexander concentrates on the Essay Concerning Human Understanding and aims to restore that to its proper historical context. In Part I he gives a clear exposition of some of the scientific theories of Robert Boyle, which, he argues, heavily influenced Locke in employing similar concepts and terminology. Against this background, he goes on in Part II to provide an account of Locke's (...)
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  36.  52
    Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). From the Depths of Despair: Performance, Counterperformance, and “September 11”. Sociological Theory 22 (1):88-105.
    After introducing a perspective on terrorism as postpolitical and after establishing the criteria for success that are immanent in this form of antipolitical action, this essay interprets September 11, 2001, and its aftermath inside a cultural-sociological perspective. After introducing a macro-model of social performance that combines structural and semiotic with pragmatic and power-oriented dimensions, I show how the terrorist attack on New York City and the counterattacks that immediately occurred in response can be viewed as an iteration of the performance/counterperformance (...)
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  37. John Dewey, Larry Hickman & Thomas M. Alexander (1998). The Essential Dewey.
     
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  38. Hartley Alexander (1920). A Lover of the Chair. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (25):685-688.
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  39.  13
    Larry Alexander, Heidi Hurd & Peter Westen (2016). Consent Does Not Require Communication: A Reply to Dougherty. Law and Philosophy 35 (6):655-660.
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  40.  33
    G. Caleb Alexander & John D. Lantos (2006). The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Post-Managed Care Era. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):29 – 32.
  41.  1
    Rommel O. Salvador, Altaf Merchant & Elizabeth A. Alexander (2014). Faith and Fair Trade: The Moderating Role of Contextual Religious Salience. Journal of Business Ethics 121 (3):353-371.
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  42.  20
    G. Alexander, Mark Hall & John Lantos (2006). Rethinking Professional Ethics in the Cost-Sharing Era. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W17-W22.
    Changes in healthcare financing increasingly rely upon patient cost-sharing to control escalating healthcare expenditures. These changes raise new challenges for physicians that are different from those that arose either under managed care or traditional indemnity insurance. Historically, there have been two distinct bases for arguing that physicians should not consider costs in their clinical decisions?an ?aspirational ethic? that exhorts physicians to treat all patients the same regardless of their ability to pay, and an ?agency ethic? that calls on physicians to (...)
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  43.  20
    Thomas M. Alexander (1987). John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience, and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling. State University of New York Press.
    Thomas Alexander shows that the primary, guiding concern of Dewey's philosophy is his theory of aesthetic experience.
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  44.  30
    Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Ferzander’s Surrebuttal. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):463-465.
  45.  7
    David Alexander (forthcoming). Unjustified Defeaters. Erkenntnis:1-22.
    A number of philosophers have recently claimed that unjustified beliefs can be defeaters. However these claims have been made in passing, occurring in the context of defenses of other theses. As a result, the claim that unjustified beliefs can be defeaters has been neither vigorously defended nor thoroughly explained. This paper fills that gap. It begins by identifying problems with the two most in-depth accounts of the possibility of unjustified defeaters due to Bergmann and Pryor. It then offers a revised (...)
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  46. J. McKenzie Alexander (2012). Why the Angels Cannot Choose. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):619 - 640.
    Decision theory faces a number of problematic gambles which challenge it to say what value an ideal rational agent should assign to the gamble, and why. Yet little attention has been devoted to the question of what an ideal rational agent is, and in what sense decision theory may be said to apply to one. I show that, given one arguably natural set of constraints on the preferences of an idealized rational agent, such an agent is forced to be indifferent (...)
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  47. Larry Alexander (2001). The Rule of Rules: Morality, Rules, and the Dilemmas of Law. Duke University Press.
    In "The Rule of Rules" Larry Alexander and Emily Sherwin examine this dilemma.
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  48.  44
    S. Alexander (1920). Space, Time, and Deity. Macmillan.
  49. Henry Alexander (2009). Reflections on Benjamin Button. Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):pp. 1-17.
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  50. Jeffrey C. Alexander (ed.) (1998). Neofunctionalism and After. Blackwell.
    "Neofunctionalism and After" brings together for the first time in one volume all of Alexander's writings on neofunctionalism, the present volume also contains ...
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