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  1.  21
    Situating Hegel: From Transcendental Philosophy to a Phenomenology of Spirit.Michael Baur - forthcoming - In Kenneth Westphal & Marian Bykova (eds.), The Palgrave Hegel Hanbook. New York, NY:
    Michael Baur, "Situating Hegel: From Transcendental Philosophy to a Phenomenology of Spirit," in the Palgrave Hegel Handbook, edited by Marian Bykova and Kenneth Westphal (New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020).
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  2.  79
    Corporations and NGOs: When Accountability Leads to Co-Optation. [REVIEW]Dorothea Baur & Hans Peter Schmitz - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):9-21.
    Interactions between corporations and nonprofits are on the rise, frequently driven by a corporate interest in establishing credentials for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we show how increasing demands for accountability directed at both businesses and NGOs can have the unintended effect of compromising the autonomy of nonprofits and fostering their co-optation. Greater scrutiny of NGO spending driven by self-appointed watchdogs of the nonprofit sector and a prevalence of strategic notions of CSR advanced by corporate actors weaken the (...)
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  3.  52
    Marx on Historical Materialism.Michael Baur - 2017 - Gale Research Philosophy Series 1 and 2 (Internet Library Reference Database) (.
    Marx’s theory of historical materialism seeks to explain human history and development on the basis of the material conditions underlying all human existence. For Marx, the most important of all human activities is the activity of production by means of labor. With his focus on production through labor, Marx argues that it is possible to provide a materialistic explanation of how human beings not only transform the world (by applying the “forces of production” to it) but also transform themselves in (...)
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  4.  74
    The Moral Legitimacy of NGOs as Partners of Corporations.Dorothea Baur & Guido Palazzo - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):579-604.
    Partnerships between companies and NGOs have received considerable at­tention in CSR in the past years. However, the role of NGO legitimacy in such partnerships has thus far been neglected. We argue that NGOs assume a status as special stakeholders of corporations which act on behalf of the common good. This role requires a particular focus on their moral legitimacy. We introduce a conceptual framework for analysing the moral legitimacy of NGOs along three dimensions, building on the theory of deliberative democracy. (...)
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  5.  47
    Inter-Ethics: Towards an Interactive and Interdependent Bioethics.Tineke A. Abma, Vivianne E. Baur, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):242-255.
    Since its origin bioethics has been a specialized, academic discipline, focussing on moral issues, using a vast set of globalized principles and rational techniques to evaluate and guide healthcare practices. With the emergence of a plural society, the loss of faith in experts and authorities and the decline of overarching grand narratives and shared moralities, a new approach to bioethics is needed. This approach implies a shift from an external critique of practices towards embedded ethics and interactive practice improvement, and (...)
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  6.  37
    Winckelmann's Greek Ideal and Kant's Critical Philosophy.Michael Baur - 2018 - In Daniel Dahlstrom (ed.), Kant and His German Contemporaries: Volume 2, Aesthetics, History, Politics, and Religion. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 50-68.
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  7.  66
    Hegel and Aquinas on Self-Knowledge and Historicity.Michael Baur - 1994 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 68:125.
    The Hegelian and the Thomistic accounts of self-knowledge are solidly Aristotelian in their origins and motivations. In their conclusions and consequences, however, the two accounts exhibit significant differences. Hegel argues that genuine self-knowledge is necessarily social and historical, while Aquinas says nothing about history or society in his account of self-knowledge. The aim of this paper is not to decide the issue concerning historicity in favor of either Hegel or Aquinas. The aim here is rather to address a prior question: (...)
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  8.  64
    The Role of Skepticism in the Emergence of German Idealism.Michael Baur - 1999 - In Michael Baur & Daniel Dahlstrom (eds.), The Emergence of German Idealism. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 63-91.
    According to Immanuel Kant’s well-known account of his own intellectual development, it was the skeptic David Hume who roused him from his dogmatic slumber. According to some popular accounts of post-Kantian philosophy, it was the soporific speculation of the idealists that quickly returned German philosophy to the Procrustean bed of unverifiable metaphysics, where it dogmatically slept for half of the nineteenth century. This popular picture of post-Kantian German philosophy receives some apparent support from the relevant evidence. After all, Kant had (...)
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  9.  70
    Incommensurable Goods, Alternative Possibilities, and the Self-Refutation of the Self-Refutation of Determinism.Michael Baur - 2005 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 50 (1):165-171.
    In his paper, "Free Choice, Incommensurable Goods and the Self-Refutation of Determinism,"' Joseph Boyle seeks to show how the argument for the self-refutation of determinism - first articulated over twenty-five years ago - is an argument whose force depends on (first) a proper understanding of just what free choice is, and (secondly) a proper understanding of how free choice is a principle of moral responsibility. According to Boyle, a person can make a genuinely free choice only if he is presented (...)
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  10.  63
    From Kant’s Highest Good to Hegel’s Absolute Knowing.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Michael Baur & Stephen Houlgate (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Hegel. Malden, MA, USA: pp. 452-473.
    Hegel’s most abiding aspiration was to be a volkserzieher (an educator of the people) in the tradition of thinkers of Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786), Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (1729-1781), and Friedrich Schiller (159-1786). No doubt, he was also deeply interested in epistemology and metaphysics, but this interest stemmed at least in part from his belief (which Kant also shared) that human beings could become truly liberated to fulfill their vocations as human beings, only if they were also liberated from the illusions and (...)
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  11.  61
    Fichte’s Impossible Contract.Michael Baur - 2006 - In Tom Rockmore & Daniel Breazeale (eds.), Rights, Bodies, Recognition: New Essays on Fichte’s Foundations of Natural Right. Aldershot, UK: pp. 11-25.
    As I hope to show in this paper, Fichte’s rejection of traditional social contractarian accounts of human social relations is related to his rejection of the search for a criterion, or external standard, by which we might measure our knowledge in epistemology. More specifically, Fichte’s account of the impossibility of a normative social contract (as traditionally construed) is related to his account of the impossibility of our knowing things as they might be “in themselves,” separate from and independent of our (...)
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  12.  68
    Hegel and the Classical Pragmatists: Prolegomenon to a Future Discussion.Michael Baur - 2014 - In Judith Green (ed.), Richard J. Bernstein and the Pragmatic Turn in Contemporary Philosophy: Rekindling Pragmatism's Fire. New York, NY, USA: pp. 39-52.
    As Richard Bernstein has suggested, there is a very rich and interesting story to be told about how the classical pragmatists (Dewey, Peirce, and James) understood G. W. R Hegel, made use of Hegel, and ultimately distanced themselves from Hegel. That story cannot be told here. Indeed, the story is so rich and complicated that even its beginnings cannot be told here. But what can be provided, perhaps, is a limited, though hopefully illuminating, perspective on a few salient aspects of (...)
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  13.  57
    Law and Political Thought.Michael Baur - 2013 - In Gregory Claeys (ed.), Encyclopedia of Modern Political Thought. Thousand Oaks, CA: pp. 488-494.
    In the modern period, the most original and influential theories about law and politics were developed in connection with a set of far-reaching, interrelated questions about the definition of law, the purpose of law, the relationship between law and morality, and the existence of natural law and natural rights. In this entry I summarize the contributions of Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu; William Blackstone; Jeremy Bentham; and Immanuel Kant as exemplars of the history of modern (...)
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  14.  50
    American Pie’ and the Self-Critique of Rock ‘N’ Roll.Michael Baur - 2006 - In William Irwin & Jorge J. E. Gracia (eds.), Philosophy and the Interpretation of Popular Culture. Lanham, MD: pp. 255-273.
    More than thirty-five years after its first release in 1971, Don McLean’s “American Pie” still resonates deeply with music listeners and consumers of popular culture. In a 2001 public poll sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Recording Industry Association of America, McLean’s eight-and-a-half-minute masterpiece was ranked number 5 among the 365 “most memorable” songs of the twentieth century. In 2002, the song was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1997, Garth brooks performed “American Pie” (...)
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  15.  52
    Introduction to G.W.F. Hegel Key Concepts.Michael Baur - 2014 - In G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts. New York: pp. 1-13.
    The thought of G. W. F. Hegel (1770 -1831) has had a deep and lasting influence on a wide range of philosophical, political, religious, aesthetic, cultural and scientific movements. But, despite the far-reaching importance of Hegel's thought, there is often a great deal of confusion about what he actually said or believed. G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts provides an accessible introduction to both Hegel's thought and Hegel-inspired philosophy in general, demonstrating how his concepts were understood, adopted and critically transformed (...)
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  16.  31
    Seeking Connections, Creating Movement: The Power of Altruistic Action.Tineke A. Abma & Vivianne Baur - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (4):366-384.
    Participation of older people in designing and improving the care and services provided in residential care settings is limited. Traditional forms of democratic representation, such as client councils, and consumer models are management-driven. An alternative way of involving older people in the decisions over their lives, grounded in notions of care ethics and deliberative democracy, was explored by action research. In line with this tradition older people engage in collective action to enhance the control over their lives and those of (...)
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  17.  34
    Idealism - New Dictionary of the History of Ideas Entry.Michael Baur - 2005 - In Maryanne Cline Horowitz (ed.), New Dictionary of the History of Ideas. Detroit, MI, USA: pp. 1078-1082.
  18.  44
    Can Natural Law Thinking Be Made Credible in Our Contemporary Context?Michael Baur - 2010 - In Christian Spieβ (ed.), Freiheit, Natur, Religion: Studien zur Sozialethik. Paderborn, Germany: pp. 277-297.
    One of the best-known members of the United Nations Commission which drafted the 1948 "Universal Declaration of Human Rights," Jacques Maritain, famously held that the "natural rights" or "human rights" possessed by every human being are grounded and justified by reference to the natural law.' In many quarters today, the notion of the natural law, and arguments for a set of natural rights grounded in the natural law, have come under fierce attack. One common line of attack is illustrated by (...)
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  19.  33
    Coming-to-Know as a Way of Coming-to-Be: Aristotle’s De Anima III.5.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Michael Baur & Robert Wood (eds.), Person, Being, and History: Essays in Honor of Kenneth L. Schmitz. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 77-102.
  20.  46
    Hegel and Hermeneutics.Michael Baur - 2014 - In G.W.F. Hegel: Key Concepts. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 208-221.
    Understood in its widest sense, the term “hermeneutics” can be taken to refer to the theory and/or practice of any interpretation aimed at uncovering the meaning of any expression, regardless of whether such expression was produced by a human or non-human source. Understood in a narrower sense, the term “hermeneutics” can be taken to refer to a particular stream of thought regarding the theory and/or practice of interpretation, developed mainly by German-speaking theorists from the late eighteenth through to the late (...)
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  21.  34
    Decalogue Five: A Short Film About Killing, Sin, and Community.Michael Baur - 2016 - In Eva Badowska & Francesca Parmeggiani (eds.), Of Elephants and Toothaches: Ethics, Politics, and Religion in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Decalogue. New York, NY, USA: Fordham University. pp. 122-139.
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  22.  37
    We All Need Mirrors to Remind Us Who We Are: Inherited Meaning and Inherited Selves in Memento.Michael Baur - 2005 - In Paul Tudico & Kimberly Blessing (eds.), Movies and the Meaning of Life: Philosophers Take On Hollywood. Chicago, IL, USA: Open Court Publishing Company. pp. 94-110.
    The movie Memento (2000) broaches several interrelated philosophical questions concerning human knowledge, personal identity, and the human search for meaning. For example, is our knowledge based mainly on conclusions reached through our own reason, or is it based instead on habituation and conditioning brought about by forces outside of us? What is the role that memory plays in our knowledge? Furthermore, what is the relationship between memory and personal identity? And what is the relationship between memory, personal identity, and the (...)
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  23.  6
    “Why Should We Care About Marriage Equality?”: Political Advocacy as a Part of Corporate Responsibility.Florian Wettstein & Dorothea Baur - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):199-213.
    More and more companies are publicly taking a stand on social and political issues such as gay marriage legislation. This paper argues that this type of engagement, which can be called “corporate political advocacy,” raises new conceptual and normative challenges especially for theories of corporate responsibility. Furthermore, it poses practical challenges for managers who are confronted with it. This paper addresses all three challenges: first, it defines and conceptualizes corporate political advocacy and distinguishes it from other forms of corporate political (...)
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  24.  10
    The End of History and the Last Man. [REVIEW]Michael Baur - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48:135-137.
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  25.  31
    What is Distinctive About Terrorism, and What Are the Philosophical Implications?Michael Baur - 2005 - In Timothy Shanahan (ed.), Philosophy 9/11: Thinking About the War on Terrorism. Chicago: Open Court. pp. 3-21.
    On September 11, 2001, Americans were painfully reminded of a truth that for years had been easy to overlook, namely, that terrorism can affect every person in the world – regardless of location, nationality, political conviction, or occupation – and that, in principle, nobody is beyond terrorism’s reach. However, our renewed awareness of the ubiquity of the terrorist threat has been accompanied by wide disagreement and confusion about the moral status of terrorism and how terrorism ought to be confronted. Much (...)
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  26.  37
    Natural Law and the Natural Environment: Pope Benedict XVI's Vision Beyond Utilitarianism and Deontology.Michael Baur - 2013 - In Tobias Winwright & Jame Schaefer (eds.), Environmental Justice and Climate Change: Assessing Pope Benedict XVI's Ecological Vision for the Catholic Church in the United States. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 43-57.
    In his 2009 encyclical letter Caritas in Veritate, Pope Benedict XVI calls for a deeper, theological and metaphysical evaluation of the category of “relation” to achieve a proper understanding of the human being’s “transcendent dignity.” For some contemporary thinkers, this position might seem to be hopelessly paradoxical or even incoherent. After all, many contemporary thinkers are apt to believe that the human creature can have “transcendent dignity” only if the being and goodness of the human creature is not conditioned by (...)
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  27.  35
    Systematically Unsystematic Violence: On the Definition and Moral Status of Terrorism.Michael Baur - 2006 - In Kem Crimmins & Herbert De Vriese (eds.), The Reason of Terror: Philosophical Responses to Terrorism. Louvain and Dudley, MA: pp. 3-32.
    Shortly after the bus and subway bombings in London on July 7, 2005, United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan called upon world leaders to reach consensus on a definition of terrorism, one that would facilitate 'moral clarity' and underwrite the United Nations convention against terrorism. The Secretary General's plea to world leaders help to highlight the practical significance and urgency of having a workable definition of terrorism. For the task of defining terrorism is not only theoretically or academically important; it (...)
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  28.  32
    Natural Law and the Legislation of Virtue: Historicity, Positivity, and Circularity.Michael Baur - 2001 - Vera Lex 2:51-70.
    As Alexander D’Entrees observed over forty years ago, the case for natural law “is not an easy one to put clearly and convincingly.” Furthermore, even if one can make the case for natural law in a clear and convincing manner, one should not expect such an argument to be clear and convincing for all time. Instead, the case for natural law must be an ongoing argument, addressing itself perpetually to the needs of the time as these needs shift and change. (...)
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  29.  24
    In Defense of Finnis on Natural Law Legal Theory.Michael Baur - 2005 - Vera Lex 6 (1/2):35-56.
  30.  32
    And the Time Will Come When You See We’Re All One: The Beatles and Idealistic Monism.Michael Baur - 2006 - In Michael Baur & Steven Baur (eds.), The Beatles and Philosophy: Nothing You Can Think That Can’t Be Thunk. Chicago, IL, USA: pp. 13-24.
    In spite of their lack of interest in traditional philosophy and their explicit disavowals about the deeper meaning of their songs, there are also good reasons to approach and interpret the Beatles and their work from a philosophical point of view. In his Playboy interview from September of 1980, John praised Paul for the philosophical significance of the song, “The End,” which appeared on the Abbey Road album: “That’s Paul again. . . . he had a line in it – (...)
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  31.  38
    Corporations as Political Actors – a Report on the First Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility.Andreas Rasche, Dorothea Baur, Mariëtte van Huijstee, Stephen Ladek, Jayanthi Naidu, Cecilia Perla, Esther Schouten, Michael Valente & Mingrui Zhang - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):151 - 173.
    This paper presents a report on the first Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility, which was held between the 8th and 9th December 2006 at HEC Lausanne in Switzerland. The first section of the report introduces the topic of the master class – ‚Corporations as Political Actors – Facing the Postnational Challenge’ – as well as the concept of the master class. The second section gives an overview of papers written by nine young scholars that were selected to present (...)
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  32.  26
    Law and Natural Law.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    Aquinas's account of law as an ordering of reason for the common good of a community depends on the mereology that covered his theory of parthood relations, including the relations of parts to parts and parts to wholes. Aquinas argued that 'all who are included in a community stand in relation to that community as parts to a whole', and 'every individual person is compared to the whole community as part to whole'. Aquinas held that the perfection of wholes through (...)
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  33.  27
    Self-Measure and Self-Moderation in Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre.Michael Baur - 2001 - In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), New Studies in Fichte’s Grundlage der gesamten Wissenschaftslehre. Amherst, NY, USA: pp. 81-102.
    In the opening chapter of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, John Locke explains that the self-understanding or self-measure of the human mind includes an account of the mind’s limits, and so the mind’s self-understanding can provide adequate grounds for intellectual self-moderation or self-control: “If we can find out, how far the Understanding can extend its view; how far it has Faculties to attain Certainty; and in what Cases it can only judge and guess, we may learn to content our selves (...)
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  34.  28
    “Beyond Standard Legal Positivism and ‘Aggressive’ Natural Law: Some Thoughts on Judge’ O’Scannlain’s ‘Third Way’”.Michael Baur - 2011 - Fordham Law Review 79 (4):1529-1539.
    With his contribution on "The Natural Law in the American Tradition," Judge Diarmuid O'Scannlain has begun the indispensable task of laying the groundwork for sound jurisprudential reasoning in the natural law tradition. It is on the basis of this groundwork that we can begin to appreciate what natural law reasoning might mean, and what it does not mean, for contemporary American legal thinking. More specifically, it is on the basis of this groundwork that one can begin to articulate what might (...)
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  35. Sublating Kant and the Old Metaphysics: A Reading of the Transition From Being to Essence in Hegel's Logic.Michael Baur - 1998 - The Owl of Minerva 29 (2):139-164.
    Kant’s “transcendental” or “critical” philosophy is an instance of what can be called the “critique of immediacy.” As part of his critical project, Kant argues that one cannot merely assume that there is a reestablished harmony between thought and being. Instead, one must effect a “return to the subject” and examine the forms of thought themselves, in order to determine the extent to which thought and being are commensurable. As a result of his “transcendental turn,” Kant concludes that what at (...)
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  36.  22
    Ethics, Rationality, Dialectic, and Community.Michael Baur - 1985 - Claremont Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy 5:12-29.
    The so-called problem of arguing “from what is to what ought to be” was popularized by G.E. Moore in Principia Ethica (1903), and has received much attention from modern philosophers. I would like to argue that this apparent problem rests on a false dichotomy between our knowing and our doing.
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  37.  21
    Questions Philosophers Ask.Michael Baur - 1987 - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 6:21-35.
    What one conceives philosophy to be is largely a function of one’s own philosophical position. So if the history of philosophy has been characterized by radical disagreement between different philosophical positions, it should be no surprise that a similar disagreement happens to characterize discussion on just what philosophy itself is. In the following essay, I shall attempt to suggest a set of criteria – named the questions that philosophers characteristically ask – for grounding an adequate definition of philosophy. The articulation (...)
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  38.  46
    A Companion to Hegel.Stephen Houlgate & Michael Baur (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  39.  6
    The Sensible Health Care Professional: A Care Ethical Perspective on the Role of Caregivers in Emotionally Turbulent Practices.Vivianne Baur, Inge van Nistelrooij & Linus Vanlaere - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):483-493.
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  40.  18
    Innocent Owners and Guilty Property.Michael Baur - 1996 - Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 20:279-292.
    American in rem, or civil, forfeiture laws seem to implicate constitutional concerns insofar as such laws may authorize the government to confiscate privately owned property, regardless of the guilt or innocence of the owner. Historically, the justification of in rem forfeiture law has rested on the legal fiction that “[t]he thing is . . . primarily considered as the offender, or rather the offense is attached primarily to the thing.” Last Term, in Bennis v. Michigan, the Supreme Court upheld the (...)
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  41.  70
    A Contribution To The Gadamer – Lonergan Discussion.Michael Baur - 1990 - Method 8 (1):14-23.
    One important element in Lonergan’s philosophical work is the attempt to demonstrate the essential continuity between Aristotle’s thought and the explanatory viewpoint of modern science. Among other things, this attempt is meant to serve a two-fold purpose: first of all, to defend both Aristotle’s intellectualist metaphysics and the explanatory aspirations of modern science over against the caricatured representations of each which grew out of the Renaissance debate between the Aristotelians and the proponents of modern science; and secondly, to demonstrate the (...)
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  42.  15
    On Actualizing Public Reason.Michael Baur - 2004 - Fordham Law Review 72 (5):2153-2175.
    In this Essay, I examine some apparent difficulties with what I call the "actualization criterion" connected to Rawls's notion of public reason, that is, the criterion for determining when Rawlsian public reason is concretely actualized by citizens in their deliberating and deciding about constitutional essentials and matters of basic justice. While these apparent difficulties have led some commentators to reject Rawlsian public reason altogether, I offer an interpretation that might allow Rawlsian public reason to escape the difficulties. My reading involves (...)
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  43.  5
    Hegel, Literature and the Problem of Agency. [REVIEW]M. Baur - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):134-134.
    Review of Hegel, Literature and the Problem of Agency by Allen Speight.
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  44.  65
    A Conversation With Hans-Georg Gadamer.Michael Baur - 1990 - Method 8 (1):1-13.
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  45. Hegel, Literature and the Problem of Agency (Review). [REVIEW]Michael Baur - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):134-135.
  46.  9
    Unable to Resist the Temptation to Tell the Truth or to Lie for the Organization? Identification Makes the Difference.Carolin Baur, Roman Soucek, Ulrich Kühnen & Roy F. Baumeister - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Previous research indicates that the depletion of self-regulatory resources can promote unethical behavior that benefits the self. Extending this literature, we focus on norm-transgressing behavior that is intended to primarily benefit others. In particular, we predicted a differing effect of self-regulatory resource depletion on dishonesty that benefits one’s group, depending on the degree of identification with the group. Following a dual process approach, we argue that if identification with the group is strong, then people may have an automatic inclination to (...)
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  47.  7
    On Ω 1 -Categorical Theories of Abelian Groups.Angus Macintyre, Joachim Reineke, J. T. Baldwin, Jan Saxl & Walter Baur - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):317-321.
  48.  92
    Phenomenological Interpretations with Respect to Aristotle: Indication of the Hermeneutical Situation by Martin Heidegger.Michael Baur - 1992 - Man and World 25 (3-4):355-393.
    When it comes to understanding the genesis and development of Heidegger’s thought, it would be rather difficult to overestimate the importance of the “Aristotle-Introduction” of 1922, Heidegger’s “Phenomenological Interpretations with Respect to Aristotle.” This text is both a manifesto which describes the young Heidegger’s philosophical commitments, as well as a promissory note which outlines his projected future work. This Aristotle-Introduction not only enunciates Heidegger’s broad project of a philosophy which is both systematic and historical; it also indicates, in particular, why (...)
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  49. Foundations of Natural Right.Frederick Neuhouser & Michael Baur (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the history of philosophy, Fichte's thought marks a crucial transitional stage between Kant and post-Kantian philosophy. Fichte radicalized Kant's thought by arguing that human freedom, not external reality, must be the starting point of all systematic philosophy, and in Foundations of Natural Right, thought by many to be his most important work of political philosophy, he applies his ideas to fundamental issues in political and legal philosophy, covering such topics as civic freedom, rights, private property, contracts, family relations, and (...)
     
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  50.  86
    Kant, Lonergan, and Fichte on the Critique of Immediacy and the Epistemology of Constraint in Human Knowing.Michael Baur - 2003 - International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):91-112.
    One of the defining characteristics of Kant’s “critical philosophy” is what has been called the “critique of immediacy” or the rejection of the “myth of the given.” According to the Kantian position, no object can count as an object for a human knower apart from the knower’s own activity or spontaneity. That is, no object can count as an object for a human knower on the basis of the object’s givenness alone. But this gives rise to a problem: how is (...)
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