Results for 'Cartesian physics'

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  1.  16
    Cartesian Physics in Two Unknown Disputations by Pierre Bayle.Jacob Van Sluis - 2000 - Bijdragen 61 (2):123-135.
    Pierre Bayle was professor of philosophy at the Illustrious School in Rotterdam from 1681 until 1693. Little is known about his courses there. However, the discovery of two disputations, Theses philosophicae, which were defended by students under his supervision, makes clear that he taught elementary Cartesian physics in a rather orthodox way. It is obvious that he did not change the course which he had given in Sedan in 1677, and which was published under the title Cours de (...)
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  2. Cartesian Spacetime: Descartes' Physics and Relational Theory of Space and Motion.Edward Slowik - 2002 - Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.
    Although Descartes’ natural philosophy marked an important advance in the development of modern science, many of his specific concepts of science have been largely discarded, and consequently neglected, since their introduction in the seventeenth century. Many critics over the years, such as Newton (in his early paper De gravitatione), have presented a series of apparently devastating arguments against Descartes' theory of space and motion; a generally negative historical verdict which, moreover, most contemporary scholars accept. Nevertheless, it is also true that (...)
     
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  3.  86
    On Force in Cartesian Physics.John Byron Manchak - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (3):295-306.
    There does not seem to be a consistent way to ground the concept of “force” in Cartesian first principles. In this article, I first review the literature on the subject. Then, I offer an alternative interpretation of force—one that seems to be coherent and consistent with Descartes’ project. Not only does the new position avoid the problems of previous interpretations, but it does so in such a way as to support and justify those previous interpretations. *Received June 2007; revised (...)
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  4.  41
    Micro-Chaos and Idealization in Cartesian Physics.Alan Nelson - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):377 - 391.
  5. The Mathematisation of Nature and Cartesian Physics.Ladislav Kvasz - 2003 - Philosophia Naturalis 40 (2):157-182.
     
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  6.  73
    Mechanism and Fracture in Cartesian Physics.Mark Wilson - 1997 - Topoi 16 (2):141-152.
    I'm scarcely the only reader who has found it puzzling that the self-consistent author of the Meditations, with his firm faith that God has supplied us with clear and distinct ideas sufficient to understand the material world, could have been satisfied with the messy jumble of physical doctrine we seem to find in his ~Priuci les. For example, although Descartes seems to be committed to a relationalism of some sort, his notorious laws of impact look as if they blatantly rely (...)
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  7.  34
    The Relation of Malebranche and Leibniz on Questions in Cartesian Physics.F. P. Hoskyn - 1930 - The Monist 40 (1):131-145.
  8.  47
    The Metaphysical Roots of Cartesian Physics: The Law of Rectilinear Motion.Geoffrey Gorham - 2005 - Perspectives on Science 13 (4):431-451.
    : This paper presents a detailed account of Descartes' derivation of his second law of nature—the law of rectilinear motion—from a priori metaphysical principles. Unlike the other laws the proof of the second depends essentially on a metaphysical assumption about the temporal immediacy of God's operation. Recent commentators (e.g., Des Chene and Garber) have not adequately explained the precise role of this assumption in the proof and Descartes' reasoning has continued to seem somewhat arbitrary as a result. My account better (...)
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  9.  32
    Information: Resurrection of the Cartesian Physics.Koichiro Matsuno - 1997 - World Futures 49 (3):235-249.
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  10. Withdrawal From the Senses and Cartesian Physics in the "Meditations".Sarah Patterson - unknown
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  11.  17
    Jacob van Sluis, Cartesian Physics in Two Unknown Disputations by Pierre Bayle Pierre Bayle (1647-1706) Was Professor of Philosophy at the Illustrious School in Rotterdam From 1681 Until 1693. Little is Known About His Courses There. However, the Discovery of Two Disputations, Theses Philosophicae, Which Were Defended by Students Under His Supervision, Makes Clear That He Taught Elementary Cartesian Physics in a Rather Orthodox Way. It is Obvious. [REVIEW]Peter Commandeur - 2000 - Bijdragen, Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie En Theologie 61 (2):201.
  12. Newton and Cartesian Physics.L. Kvasz - 2008 - Filozofia 63:93-108.
     
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  13.  3
    The Father of Cartesian Empiricism: Robert Desgabets on the Physics and Metaphysics of Blood Transfusion.Patricia Easton - unknown
    The period in the history of blood transfusion that I discuss is roughly 1628, the date of publication of Harvey’s work on blood circulation, De Motu Cordis, and 1668, the year of the first allegedly successful transfusion of blood into a human subject by a French physician Jean Denis, and the official order to prohibit the procedure. The subject of special interest in this history is Robert Desgabets, an early defender and teacher of the Cartesian philosophy at St. Maur, (...)
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  14.  95
    Surmounting the Cartesian Cut Through Philosophy, Physics, Logic, Cybernetics, and Geometry: Self-Reference, Torsion, the Klein Bottle, the Time Operator, Multivalued Logics and Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW]Diego L. Rapoport - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (1):33-76.
    In this transdisciplinary article which stems from philosophical considerations (that depart from phenomenology—after Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger and Rosen—and Hegelian dialectics), we develop a conception based on topological (the Moebius surface and the Klein bottle) and geometrical considerations (based on torsion and non-orientability of manifolds), and multivalued logics which we develop into a unified world conception that surmounts the Cartesian cut and Aristotelian logic. The role of torsion appears in a self-referential construction of space and time, which will be further related (...)
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  15. ‘One Common Matter’ in Descartes' Physics: The Cartesian Concepts of Matter Quantities, Weight and Gravity.Charis Charalampous - 2019 - Annals of Science 76 (3-4):324-339.
    ABSTRACTIt is common to assume that Descartes did not have a conception of an object's matter density independently of its size, but this is a rather incomplete assessment of the early modern natural philosopher's theory. Key to our understanding of Descartes's physics is a consideration of the ratios between the quantities of the different types of matter in which an object consists. As these ratios determine the degree of an object's porosity and elasticity, they also affect in Descartes's theory (...)
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  16.  14
    Physics and Necessity: Rationalist Pursuits From the Cartesian Past to the Quantum Present.Olivier Darrigol - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book recounts a few ingenious attempts to derive physical theories by reason only, beginning with Descartes' geometric construction of the world, and finishing with recent derivations of quantum mechanics from natural axioms.
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  17. On the Cartesian Ontology of General Relativity: Or, Conventionalism in the History of the Substantival‐Relational Debate.Edward Slowik - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1312-1323.
    Utilizing Einstein’s comparison of General Relativity and Descartes’ physics, this investigation explores the alleged conventionalism that pervades the ontology of substantival and relationist conceptions of spacetime. Although previously discussed, namely by Rynasiewicz and Hoefer, it will be argued that the close similarities between General Relativity and Cartesian physics have not been adequately treated in the literature—and that the disclosure of these similarities bolsters the case for a conventionalist interpretation of spacetime ontology.
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  18.  30
    Dennis Des Chene is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. His Research Interests Are in Early Modern Philosophy and Sci-Ence, and He has Written on Natural Philosophy—Including Physics and the Life Sciences—in Late Scholastic and Cartesian Thought. [REVIEW]Lisa Shapiro & Karen Detlefsen - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4).
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  19.  89
    Cartesian Spacetime: Descartes' Physics and the Relational Theory of Space and Motion.Nick Huggett - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):189-193.
  20.  12
    Olivier Darrigol. Physics and Necessity: Rationalist Pursuits From the Cartesian Past to the Quantum Present. Xiv + 400 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Oxford University Press. £40.99. [REVIEW]Christoph Lehner - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):825-826.
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  21.  11
    « Pour Descartes » : Mathématiques Et Physique Cartésiennes. Introduction/ For Descartes » : Cartesian Mathematics and Physics. Introduction. [REVIEW]Michel Serfati - 1998 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 51 (2):171-182.
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  22.  10
    Cartesian Forces in a Soulless Physics.Zuraya Monroy-Nasr - 2015 - Philosophia Scientae 19:175-184.
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  23.  2
    7. The Aftermath: The Cartesian Heritage in ’s Gravesande’s Foundation of Newtonian Physics.Andrea Strazzoni - 2018 - In Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ‘s Gravesande. De Gruyter. pp. 171-197.
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  24. Edward Slowick: Cartesian Spacetime: Descartes' Physics and the Relational Theory of Space and Motion.Laura Benitez - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):182-185.
     
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  25. Idealizing the Cartesian-Newtonian Paradigm as Reality: The Impact of New-Paradigm Physics on Psychological Theory.J. Wade - 1997 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 56:9-34.
     
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  26. Cartesianism and the Kinematics of Mechanisms: Or, How to Find Fixed Reference Frames in a Cartesian Space-Time.Edward Slowik - 1998 - Noûs 32 (3):364-385.
    In De gravitatione, Newton contends that Descartes' physics is fundamentally untenable since the "fixed" spatial landmarks required to ground the concept of inertial motion cannot be secured in the constantly changing Cartesian plenum. Likewise, it is has often been alleged that the collision rules in Descartes' Principles of Philosophy undermine the "relational" view of space and motion advanced in this text. This paper attempts to meet these challenges by investigating the theory of connected gears (or "kinematics of mechanisms") (...)
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  27.  2
    Olivier Darrigol, Physics and Necessity: Rationalist Pursuits From the Cartesian Past to the Quantum Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. Xv + 400. ISBN 978-0-19-871288-6. £39.00. [REVIEW]Kanta Dihal - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Science 49 (2):321-322.
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  28.  40
    Descartes' Quantity of Motion: 'New Age' Holism Meets the Cartesian Conservation Principle.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):178–202.
    This essay explores various problematical aspects of Descartes' conservation principle for the quantity of motion (size times speed), particularly its largely neglected "dual role" as a measure of both durational motion and instantaneous "tendencies towards motion". Overall, an underlying non-local, or "holistic", element of quantity of motion (largely derived from his statics) will be revealed as central to a full understanding of the conservation principle's conceptual development and intended operation; and this insight can be of use in responding to some (...)
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  29.  82
    Huygens' Center-of-Mass Space-Time Reference Frame: Constructing a Cartesian Dynamics in the Wake of Newton's “de Gravitatione” Argument.Edward Slowik - 1997 - Synthese 112 (2):247-269.
    This paper explores the possibility of constructing a Cartesian space-time that can resolve the dilemma posed by a famous argument from Newton's early essay, De gravitatione. In particular, Huygens' concept of a center-of-mass reference frame is utilized in an attempt to reconcile Descartes' relationalist theory of space and motion with both the Cartesian analysis of bodily impact and conservation law for quantity of motion. After presenting a modern formulation of a Cartesian space-time employing Huygens' frames, a series (...)
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  30.  58
    Descartes and Circular Inertia.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Modern Schoolman 77 (1):1-11.
    This paper explores the Cartesian physics of circular motion, in particular, the long-standing puzzle concerning the possible role of a circular inertial concept in Descartes' theories. Although some commentators have claimed that Descartes' famous "rotating sling" examples favor a rotational component of "striving" towards motion, and that this aspect of his project constitutes a form of inertial thinking, it will be argued that a much stronger case for a Cartesian brand of rotational inertial motion can be constructed (...)
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  31.  42
    Perfect Solidity: Natural Laws and the Problem of Matter in Descartes' Universe.Edward Slowik - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):187 - 204.
    In the Principles of Philosophy, Descartes attempts to explicate the well-known phenomena of varying bodily size through an appeal to the concept of "solidity," a notion that roughly corresponds to our present-day concept of density. Descartes' interest in these issues can be partially traced to the need to define clearly the role of matter in his natural laws, a problem particularly acute for the application of his conservation principle. Specifically, since Descartes insists that a body's "quantity of motion," defined as (...)
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  32.  35
    Cartesian Psychology of Antoine Le Grand.Gary Hatfield - 2014 - In Mihnea Dobre & Tammy Nyden (eds.), Cartesian Empiricisms. Springer. pp. 251-274.
    In the Aristotelian curriculum, De anima or the study of the soul fell under the rubric of physics. This area of study covered the vital (“vegetative”), sensitive, and rational powers of the soul. Descartes’ substance dualism restricted reason or intellect, and conscious sensation, to human minds. Having denied mind to nonhuman animals, Descartes was required to explain all animal behavior using material mechanisms possessing only the properties of size, shape, position, and motion. Within the framework of certainty provided by (...)
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  33.  98
    Descartes, Spacetime, and Relational Motion.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (1):117-139.
    This paper examines Descartes' problematic relational theory of motion, especially when viewed within the context of his dynamics, the Cartesian natural laws. The work of various commentators on Cartesian motion is also surveyed, with particular emphasis placed upon the recent important texts of Garber and Des Chene. In contrast to the methodology of most previous interpretations, however, this essay employs a modern "spacetime" approach to the problem. By this means, the role of dynamics in Descartes' theory, which has (...)
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  34. The Indefinite Within Descartes' Mathematical Physics.Françoise Monnoyeur-Broitman - 2013 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 19:107-122.
    Descartes' philosophy contains an intriguing notion of the infinite, a concept labeled by the philosopher as indefinite. Even though Descartes clearly defined this term on several occasions in the correspondence with his contemporaries, as well as in his Principles of Philosophy, numerous problems about its meaning have arisen over the years. Most commentators reject the view that the indefinite could mean a real thing and, instead, identify it with an Aristotelian potential infinite. In the first part of this article, I (...)
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  35. Late-Scholastic and Cartesian Conatus.Rodolfo Garau - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (4):479-494.
    Introduction Conatus is a specific concept within Descartes’s physics. In particular, it assumes a crucial importance in the purely mechanistic description of the nature of light – an issue that Des- cartes considered one of the most crucial challenges, and major achievements, of his natural phil- osophy. According to Descartes’s cosmology, the universe – understood as a material continuum in which there is no vacuum – is composed of a number of separate yet interconnected vortices. Each of these vortices (...)
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  36.  47
    A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II.Emily R. Grosholz - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:116 - 124.
    The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion of (...)
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  37.  34
    Descartes' Metaphysical Physics.Lisa Downing - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (1):146-147.
    Garber easily achieves his stated goal of providing "a book that pulls together various aspects of Descartes' metaphysical approach to the world of body and presents them in a systematic and coherent way, a kind of handbook of Cartesian physics". Such a work has indeed long been needed. The result, however, is more than just a handbook, for Garber's careful attention to historical context sheds considerable light on Descartes' mechanism.
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  38.  88
    Cartesian Bodies.Alice Sowaal - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):217 - 240.
    How we understand Descartes’s physics rests on how we interpret his ontological commitment to individual bodies, and in particular on how we account for their individuation. However, Descartes’s contemporaries as well as contemporary philosophers have seen Descartes’s account of the individuation of bodies as deeply flawed. In the first part of this paper, I discuss how the various problems and puzzles involved in Descartes’s account of the individuation of bodies arise, and the relevance of these problems for his (...). With an eye toward resolving these puzzles, I argue for an interpretation of the Cartesian ontology in which bodies are not individuated by motion but, instead, are mind-dependent. As part of this reading, I demonstrate the sense in which we can clearly and distinctly perceive bodies, and also the senses in which the real, conceptual, and modal distinctions apply to them. I conclude by explaining how this account of the mind-dependent individuation of bodies is consistent with Descartes’s definition of ‘motion’ and ‘a body’ in Principles, Part II, section 25—the very passage that prima facie entails the most troubling of the individuation puzzles. Finally, I show that this account is consistent with Descartes’s general goal in constructing his physics. (shrink)
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  39. Cartesian Causation: Continuous, Instantaneous, Overdetermined.Geoffrey Gorham - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):389-423.
    : Descartes provides an original and puzzling argument for the traditional theological doctrine that the world is continuously created by God. His key premise is that the parts of the duration of anything are "completely independent" of one another. I argue that Descartes derives this temporal independence thesis simply from the principle that causes are necessarily simultaneous with their effects. I argue further that it follows from Descartes's version of the continuous creation doctrine that God is the instantaneous and total (...)
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  40.  49
    Reason, Nature, and God in Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 1993 - In Stephen Voss (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Rene Descartes. Oxford University Press. pp. 259–287.
    Recent Cartesian scholarship postulates two Descartes, separating Descartes into a scientist and a metaphysician. The purpose varies, but one has been to show that the metaphysical Descartes, of the Meditations, is less genuine than the scientific Descartes. Accordingly, discussion of God and the soul, the evil demon, and the non-deceiving God were elements of rhetorical strategy to please theologians, not of serious philosophical argumentation. I agree in finding two Descartes, but the two I identify are not scientist and philosopher, (...)
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  41. Cartesian Mechanics.Sophie Roux - 2004 - In Palmerino and Thijssen (ed.), The Reception of the Galilean Science of Motion in Europe. pp. 25-66.
    In the history of the scientific revolution, Descartes is often considered as the mechanical philosopher par excellence, and opposed as such to the founder of mechanical science, that is to say, Galileo: this cliché is not without foundation, but it must not make us forget that Descartes was himself a practitioner of mechanical science. In the article "Cartesian Mechanics" I detail the meaning and reach of "mechanics" in the Cartesian corpus, and do so in three steps. 1. I (...)
     
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  42.  75
    Cartesian Method and the Problem of Reduction.Emily R. Grosholz - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    The Cartesian method, construed as a way of organizing domains of knowledge according to the "order of reasons," was a powerful reductive tool. Descartes made significant strides in mathematics, physics, and metaphysics by relating certain complex items and problems back to more simple elements that served as starting points for his inquiries. But his reductive method also impoverished these domains in important ways, for it tended to restrict geometry to the study of straight line segments, physics to (...)
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  43.  15
    Complexity, Meaning and the Cartesian Cut.Harald Atmanspacher - 1994 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):168-181.
    The relevance of the Cartesian cut as a conceptual tool to separate matter and mind in the tradition of a dualistic world view is addressed. Modern science has developed an increasing number of concepts requiring that such a cut be considered neither as a priori prescribed nor as impenetrable. Two important examples are the concepts of complexity and meaning. They are subjects of physics as the science of matter and cognitive science as the science of the mind, respectively. (...)
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  44.  80
    Holism in Cartesianism and in Today's Philosophy of Physics.Michael Esfeld - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):17-36.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if there (...)
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  45.  71
    Teaching & Learning Guide For: What is at Stake in the Cartesian Debates on the Eternal Truths?Patricia Easton - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (5):880-884.
    Any study of the 'Scientific Revolution' and particularly Descartes' role in the debates surrounding the conception of nature (atoms and the void v. plenum theory, the role of mathematics and experiment in natural knowledge, the status and derivation of the laws of nature, the eternality and necessity of eternal truths, etc.) should be placed in the philosophical, scientific, theological, and sociological context of its time. Seventeenth-century debates concerning the nature of the eternal truths such as '2 + 2 = 4' (...)
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  46.  31
    The Rise Of Cartesian Occasionalism.Andrew Russell Platt - unknown
    This study offers a new account of the development of Cartesian Occasionalism. The doctrine of Occasionalism - most famously advocated by Nicolas Malebranche - states that God alone is the cause of every event, and created substances are merely "occasional causes." In the years following René Descartes' death in 1650, several of his followers -- including Arnold Geulincx, Gerauld de Cordemoy and Louis de la Forge - argued for some version of this thesis. My study builds on recent scholarship (...)
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  47.  43
    Cartesian Primary Qualities in Light of Some Contemporary Physical Explanations.Mladen Domazet - 2008 - Prolegomena 7 (1):21-35.
    Descartes’ derivation of the primary qualities of matter and their role in explaining observed physical phenomena are briefly reviewed. The lesson drawn from Descartes’ methodology of explanation is that we ought to aim to reduce complex phenomena to simple unifying principles and conceptual primitives. Three proposed solutions to the apparent paradoxes in contemporary quantum physics (primarily associated with the notion of entanglement) are briefly compared with lessons taken from Descartes. It is argued that further research in this field should (...)
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  48. The Senses and the Fleshless Eye: The Meditations as Cognitive Exercises.Gary Hatfield - 1986 - In Amelie Rorty (ed.), Essays on Descartes' Meditations. University of California Press. pp. 45–76.
    According to the reading offered here, Descartes' use of the meditative mode of writing was not a mere rhetorical device to win an audience accustomed to the spiritual retreat. His choice of the literary form of the spiritual exercise was consonant with, if not determined by, his theory of the mind and of the basis of human knowledge. Since Descartes' conception of knowledge implied the priority of the intellect over the senses, and indeed the priority of an intellect operating independently (...)
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  49.  71
    "Because The Authority Of My Superiors Commands": Censorship, Physics And The German Jesuits 1.Marcus Hellyer - 1996 - Early Science and Medicine 1 (3):319-354.
    The Society of Jesus established an extensive range of measures designed to ensure uniformity in natural philosophical questions. These culminated in the Ordinatio pro Studiis Superioribus of 1651. Such measures did have significant effects on the teaching and publishing of physics among the Jesuits in Germany; it was impossible for Jesuits to openly adhere to atomism, the Cartesian view of body or heliocentrism, for example. But many Jesuits did not agree with all the provisions governing censorship and attempted (...)
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  50.  25
    Physiologia: Natural Philosophy in Late Aristotelian and Cartesian Thought.Dennis Des Chene - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    Physiologia provides an accessible and comprehensive guide to late Aristotelian natural philosophy; with that context in hand, it offers new interpretations of major themes in Descartes’s natural philosophy.
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