Results for 'Dying'

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  1.  60
    Deep Uncertainties in the Criteria for Physician Aid-in-Dying for Psychiatric Patients.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):54-56.
    In their insightful article, Brent Kious and Margaret Battin (2019) correctly identify an inconsistency between an involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid in dying (PAD). They declare that it may be possible to resolve the problem by articulating “objective standards for evaluating the severity of others’ suffering,” but ultimately they admit that this task is beyond the scope of their article since the solution depends on “a deep and difficult” question about comparing the worseness of two (...)
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  2. Adherence to the Request Criterion in Jurisdictions Where Assisted Dying Is Lawful? A Review of the Criteria and Evidence in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland.Penney Lewis & Isra Black - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):885-898.
    Some form of assisted dying (voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide) is lawful in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland. In order to be lawful in these jurisdictions, a valid request must precede the provision of assistance to die. Non-adherence to the criteria for valid requests for assisted dying may be a trigger for civil and/or criminal liability, as well as disciplinary sanctions where the assistor is a medical professional. In this article, we review the criteria and evidence in (...)
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  3.  48
    Palliative Sedation, Foregoing Life-Sustaining Treatment, and Aid-in-Dying: What is the Difference?Patrick Daly - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (3):197-213.
    After a review of terminology, I identify—in addition to Margaret Battin’s list of five primary arguments for and against aid-in-dying—the argument from functional equivalence as another primary argument. I introduce a novel way to approach this argument based on Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method. Then I proceed on the basis of GEM to distinguish palliative sedation, palliative sedation to unconsciousness when prognosis is less than two weeks, and foregoing life-sustaining treatment from aid-in-dying. I conclude that aid-in-dying must (...)
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  4.  54
    Should Assisted Dying Be Legalised?Thomas D. G. Frost, Devan Sinha & Barnabas J. Gilbert - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:3.
    When an individual facing intractable pain is given an estimate of a few months to live, does hastening death become a viable and legitimate alternative for willing patients? Has the time come for physicians to do away with the traditional notion of healthcare as maintaining or improving physical and mental health, and instead accept their own limitations by facilitating death when requested? The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge held the 2013 Varsity Medical Debate on the motion “This House Would Legalise (...)
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  5.  38
    Splitting the Difference? Principled Compromise and Assisted Dying.Richard Huxtable - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (9):472-480.
    Compromise on moral matters attracts ambivalent reactions, since it seems at once laudable and deplorable. When a hotly-contested phenomenon like assisted dying is debated, all-or-nothing positions tend to be advanced, with little thought given to the desirability of, or prospects for, compromise. In response to recent articles by Søren Holm and Alex Mullock, in this article I argue that principled compromise can be encouraged even in relation to this phenomenon, provided that certain conditions are present . In order to (...)
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  6.  88
    Going to Meet Death: The Art of Dying in the Early Part of the Twenty-First Century.John Hardwig - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (4):37-45.
    Better public health and medicine have given us a new kind of death and with it, a new fear – the fear that death will come too late and take too long. The generation that is dying now is largely unprepared for this new kind of death, for traditionally, people have always tried to avoid or postpone death. But if we are to avoid a bad death – too slow and too late – many of us with access to (...)
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  7.  25
    Hope, Dying and Solidarity.Anthony Wrigley - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):187-204.
    Hope takes on a particularly important role in end of life situations. Sustaining hope can have considerable benefits for the quality of life and any prospect of a good death for the dying. However, it has proved difficult to adequately account for hope when dying, particularly in some of the more extreme end of life situations. Standard secular accounts of hope struggle to establish how the fostering of hope may be possible in such situations. This leads to a (...)
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  8.  66
    On the Moral Acceptability of Physician‐Assisted Dying for Non‐Autonomous Psychiatric Patients.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):227-233.
    Several authors have recently suggested that the suffering caused by mental illness could provide moral grounds for physician-assisted dying. Yet they typically require that psychiatric-assisted dying could come to question in the cases of autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients only. Given that also non-autonomous psychiatric patients can sometimes suffer unbearably, this limitation appears questionable. In this article, I maintain that restricting psychiatric-assisted dying to autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients would not be compatible with endorsing certain end-of-life practices (...)
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  9.  48
    Doctor-Cared Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Perspective From Germany. [REVIEW]Fuat S. Oduncu & Stephan Sahm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):371-381.
    The current article deals with the ethics and practice of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and dying. The debate about PAS must take the important legal and ethical context of medical acts at the end of life into consideration, and cannot be examined independently from physicians’ duties with respect to care for the terminally ill and dying. The discussion in Germany about active euthanasia, limiting medical intervention at the end of life, patient autonomy, advanced directives, and PAS is not fundamentally (...)
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  10.  29
    Ageing Prisoners’ Views on Death and Dying: Contemplating End-of-Life in Prison.Violet Handtke & Tenzin Wangmo - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):373-386.
    Rising numbers of ageing prisoners and goals on implementing equivalent health care in prison raise issues surrounding end-of-life care for prisoners. The paucity of research on this topic in Europe means that the needs of older prisoners contemplating death in prison have not been established. To investigate elderly prisoners’ attitudes towards death and dying, 35 qualitative interviews with inmates aged 51 to 71 years were conducted in 12 Swiss prisons. About half of the prisoners reported having thought about (...) in prison, with some mentioning it in relation with suicidal thoughts and others to disease and old age. Themes identified during data analysis included general thoughts about death and dying, accounts of other prisoners’ deaths, availability of end-of-life services, contact with social relations, and wishes to die outside of prison. Study findings are discussed using Allmark’s concept of “death without indignities,” bringing forth two ethical issues: fostering autonomy and removing barriers. Attributing the identified themes to these two ethical actions clarifies the current needs of ageing prisoners in Switzerland and could be a first step towards the implementation of end-of-life services in correctional systems. (shrink)
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  11.  15
    Adherence to the Request Criterion in Jurisdictions Where Assisted Dying is Lawful? A Review of the Criteria and Evidence in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland.Penney Lewis & Isra Black - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):885-898.
    Some form of assisted dying (voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide) is lawful in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland. In order to be lawful in these jurisdictions, a valid request must precede the provision of assistance to die. Non-adherence to the criteria for valid requests for assisted dying may be a trigger for civil and/or criminal liability, as well as disciplinary sanctions where the assistor is a medical professional. In this article, we review the criteria and evidence in (...)
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  12.  26
    Assisted Dying: The Influence of Public Opinion in an Increasingly Diverse Society. [REVIEW]David Badcott - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):389-397.
    Attitudes to questions of whether physician-assisted dying should be legalised in the UK, reflect one of the greatest challenges to moral stance in health care for both individuals and professional bodies, not least as indicated by public opinion. However, public opinion is a seductively deceptive notion, seemingly readily identifiable but in practice multifarious. At best, consensus regarding public opinion and assisted dying is illusory, sometimes transient and what is relevant in this matter is a comprehension of both majority (...)
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  13.  47
    Physician-Assisted Dying and Two Senses of an Incurable Condition.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):601-604.
    It is commonly accepted that voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide can be allowed, if at all, only in the cases of patients whose conditions are incurable. Yet, there are different understandings of when a patient’s condition is incurable. In this article, I consider two understandings of the notion of an incurable condition that can be found in the recent debate on physician-assisted dying. According to one of them, a condition is incurable when it is known that there is (...)
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  14.  31
    Assisted Dying & Disability.Christopher A. Riddle - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (6):484-489.
    This article explores at least two dominant critiques of assisted dying from a disability rights perspective. In spite of these critiques, I conclude that assisted dying ought to be permissible. I arrive at the conclusion that if we respect and value people with disabilities, we ought to permit assisted dying. I do so in the following manner. First, I examine recent changes in legislation that have occurred since the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making (...)
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  15.  27
    The (Dis)Appearance of the Dying Patient in Generalist Hospital and Care Home Nurses' Talk About the Patient.Kirsten Schou, Herdis Alvsvåg, Gunnhild Blåka & Eva Gjengedal - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):233-247.
    Abstract This article explores interview data from a study of 50 Norwegian generalist nurses' focus group accounts of caring for dying patients in the hospital and care home. An eclectic discourse analytic approach was applied to nurses' accounts of the patient and three discursive contexts of reference to the patient were identified: the 'taken as read' patient, the patient paired with particular characteristics and the patient as psychologically present. Talk about the patient falls mainly into the first two contexts, (...)
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  16.  39
    Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions.Erich H. Loewy - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes (...)
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  17.  28
    “Seeing the Difference”: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Death, Dying, Humanities, and Medicine. [REVIEW]Christina Marsden Gillis - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (2):105-115.
    This essay explores how strategies integral to inquiry in the humanities provide insights into developing an interdisciplinary approach to studies of death and dying that will be relevant to medical practice as well as to humanistic study. The author asks how we can produce new modes of knowledge in an area where “knowing” is highly problematized and argues that while a putative field of death and dying studies must include a range of disciplinary approaches it must also account (...)
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  18.  8
    Death and Dying, Theories Of.Andrzej Klimczuk & Artur Fabiś - 2017 - In Bryan Turner (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social Theory. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1--7.
    Death is a state of the total disappearance of life. Dying is a process of decay of the vital system, which ends with clinical death. In current perspectives there are several approaches to research on death and dying; these are the clinical, the humanistic, the philosophical, the psychological, the anthropological, and the sociological perspective.
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  19.  57
    Death, Dying and Bereavement.Donna Dickenson, Malcolm Johnson & Jeanne Samson Katz (eds.) - 2000 - London: Sage.
    Collection of essays, literature and first-person accounts on death, dying and bereavement.
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  20.  35
    Living, Dying and the Nature of Death.Iona Heath - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1079-1081.
  21.  42
    SterbehilfeAid in Dying.Jan Schildmann, Eva Herrmann, Nicole Burchardi, Ulrich Schwantes & Jochen Vollmann - 2004 - Ethik in der Medizin 16 (2):123-132.
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  22. Legalising Euthanasia for Children: Dying with 'Dignity' or Killing the Vulnerable?Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (1):5.
    Ong, Caroline In February 2014, the Belgian parliament passed an amendment to the Belgian Act on Euthanasia of May 28th, 2002 removing the age limit of those requesting euthanasia provided that they have discerning capabilities and their parents approve. After mentioning briefly the arguments against legalising euthanasia, this article questions the ethical validity of removing the age limit, as well as the presumption that ending lives prematurely allows people to die with dignity. Caring for people who are vulnerable in their (...)
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  23.  6
    Institutional Refusal to Offer Assisted Dying: A Response to Shadd and Shadd.L. W. Sumner - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):970-972.
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  24.  19
    Institutional Non‐Participation in Assisted Dying: Changing the Conversation.Philip Shadd & Joshua Shadd - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):207-214.
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  25.  6
    Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry: A Moral Crisis?Margaret Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):29-39.
    Involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid-in-dying in terminal illness combine to create a moral dilemma. If PAD in terminal illness is permissible, it should also be permissible for some who suffer from nonterminal psychiatric illness: suffering provides much of the justification for PAD, and the suffering in mental illness can be as severe as in physical illness. But involuntary psychiatric commitment to prevent suicide suggests that the suffering of persons with mental illness does not justify ending (...)
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  26. The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying.Jeffrey Paul Bishop - 2011 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    In this original and compelling book, Jeffrey P. Bishop, a philosopher, ethicist, and physician, argues that something has gone sadly amiss in the care of the dying by contemporary medicine and in our social and political views of death, as shaped by our scientific successes and ongoing debates about euthanasia and the "right to die"--or to live. __The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying__, informed by Foucault's genealogy of medicine and power as well as by (...)
     
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  27.  28
    Doctors Have No Right to Refuse Medical Assistance in Dying, Abortion or Contraception.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):162-170.
    In an article in this journal, Christopher Cowley argues that we have ‘misunderstood the special nature of medicine, and have misunderstood the motivations of the conscientious objectors’. We have not. It is Cowley who has misunderstood the role of personal values in the profession of medicine. We argue that there should be better protections for patients from doctors' personal values and there should be more severe restrictions on the right to conscientious objection, particularly in relation to assisted dying. We (...)
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  28.  15
    Developments in the Practice of Physician-Assisted Dying: Perceptions of Physicians Who Had Experience with Complex Cases.Marianne C. Snijdewind, Donald G. van Tol, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Dick L. Willems - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):292-296.
    Background Since the enactment of the euthanasia law in the Netherlands, there has been a lively public debate on assisted dying that may influence the way patients talk about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide with their physicians and the way physicians experience the practice of EAS. Aim To show what developments physicians see in practice and how they perceive the influence of the public debate on the practice of EAS. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 28 (...)
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  29.  47
    Doctors Have No Right to Refuse Medical Assistance in Dying, Abortion or Contraception.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9).
    In an article in this journal, Christopher Cowley argues that we have ‘misunderstood the special nature of medicine, and have misunderstood the motivations of the conscientious objectors’. We have not. It is Cowley who has misunderstood the role of personal values in the profession of medicine. We argue that there should be better protections for patients from doctors' personal values and there should be more severe restrictions on the right to conscientious objection, particularly in relation to assisted dying. We (...)
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  30.  45
    Four Reasons Why Assisted Dying Should Not Be Offered for Depression.Thomas Blikshavn, Tonje Lossius Husum & Morten Magelssen - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):151-157.
    Recently, several authors have argued that assisted dying may be ethically appropriate when requested by a person who suffers from serious depression unresponsive to treatment. We here present four arguments to the contrary. First, the arguments made by proponents of assisted dying rely on notions of “treatment-resistant depression” that are problematic. Second, an individual patient suffering from depression may not be justified in believing that chances of recovery are minimal. Third, the therapeutic significance of hope must be acknowledged; (...)
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  31.  55
    Legal Physician-Assisted Dying in Oregon and the Netherlands: Evidence Concerning the Impact on Patients in "Vulnerable" Groups.M. P. Battin, A. van Der Heide, L. Ganzini, G. van Der Wal & B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):591-597.
    Background: Debates over legalisation of physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia often warn of a “slippery slope”, predicting abuse of people in vulnerable groups. To assess this concern, the authors examined data from Oregon and the Netherlands, the two principal jurisdictions in which physician-assisted dying is legal and data have been collected over a substantial period.Methods: The data from Oregon comprised all annual and cumulative Department of Human Services reports 1998–2006 and three independent studies; the data from the Netherlands comprised all (...)
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  32.  5
    Secularity, Abortion, Assisted Dying and the Future of Conscientious Objection: Modelling the Relationship Between Attitudes.Morten Magelssen, Nhat Quang Le & Magne Supphellen - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-7.
    Controversies arise over abortion, assisted dying and conscientious objection in healthcare. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between attitudes towards these bioethical dilemmas, and secularity and religiosity. Data were drawn from a 2017 web-based survey of a representative sample of 1615 Norwegian adults. Latent moderated structural equations modelling was used to develop a model of the relationship between attitudes. The resulting model indicates that support for abortion rights is associated with pro-secular attitudes and is a (...)
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  33.  3
    Are Concerns About Irremediableness, Vulnerability, or Competence Sufficient to Justify Excluding All Psychiatric Patients From Medical Aid in Dying?Suzanne Vathorst, Udo Schuklenk & William Rooney - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (4):326-343.
    Some jurisdictions that have decriminalized assisted dying exclude psychiatric patients on the grounds that their condition cannot be determined to be irremediable, that they are vulnerable and in need of protection, or that they cannot be determined to be competent. We review each of these claims and find that none have been sufficiently well-supported to justify the differential treatment psychiatric patients experience with respect to assisted dying. We find bans on psychiatric patients’ access to this service amount to (...)
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  34.  67
    Things Fall Apart: Reflections on the Dying of My Dad.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In December of 2013, my Dad died of advanced Alzheimer's and a condition called Myasthenia Gravis. This is a selection of journal entries I made over the course of the two years leading up to my Dad's death. It is not a philosophical essay, but a personal reflection, in "real time" so to speak, on the nature of the dying process in relation to questions of faith, hope, despair, and the meaning of a man's life. I offer it here (...)
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  35.  13
    Medical Assistance in Dying at a Paediatric Hospital.Carey DeMichelis, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Adam Rapoport - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):60-67.
    This article explores the ethical challenges of providing Medical Assistance in Dying in a paediatric setting. More specifically, we focus on the theoretical questions that came to light when we were asked to develop a policy for responding to MAID requests at our tertiary paediatric institution. We illuminate a central point of conceptual confusion about the nature of MAID that emerges at the level of practice, and explore the various entailments for clinicians and patients that would flow from different (...)
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  36.  13
    Aid-in-Dying Laws and the Physician's Duty to Inform.Mara Buchbinder - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):666-669.
    On 19 July 2016, three medical organisations filed a federal lawsuit against representatives from several Vermont agencies over the Patient Choice and Control at End of Life Act. The law is similar to aid-in-dying laws in four other US states, but the lawsuit hinges on a distinctive aspect of Vermont's law pertaining to patients' rights to information. The lawsuit raises questions about whether, and under what circumstances, there is an ethical obligation to inform terminally ill patients about AID as (...)
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  37.  6
    An Alternative to Medical Assistance in Dying? The Legal Status of Voluntary Stopping Eating and Drinking.Jocelyn Downie - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 1 (2).
    Medical assistance in dying has received considerable attention from many in the field of bioethics. Philosophers, theologians, lawyers, and clinicians of all sorts have engaged with many challenging aspects of this issue. Public debate, public policy, and the law have been enhanced by the varied disciplinary analyses. With the legalization of MAiD in Canada, some attention is now being turned to issues that have historically been overshadowed by the debate about whether to permit MAiD. One such issue is voluntary (...)
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  38.  46
    Are Concerns About Irremediableness, Vulnerability, or Competence Sufficient to Justify Excluding All Psychiatric Patients From Medical Aid in Dying?William Rooney, Udo Schuklenk & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (4):326-343.
    Some jurisdictions that have decriminalized assisted dying exclude psychiatric patients on the grounds that their condition cannot be determined to be irremediable, that they are vulnerable and in need of protection, or that they cannot be determined to be competent. We review each of these claims and find that none have been sufficiently well-supported to justify the differential treatment psychiatric patients experience with respect to assisted dying. We find bans on psychiatric patients’ access to this service amount to (...)
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  39.  8
    Perceptions and Intentions Toward Medical Assistance in Dying Among Canadian Medical Students.James Falconer, Félix Couture, Koray K. Demir, Michael Lang, Zachary Shefman & Mark Woo - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):22.
    Medical assistance in dying was legalized in Canada in 2016. As of July 2017, approximately 2149 patients have accessed MAID. There remains no national-level data on the perspectives of future physicians about MAID or its changing legal status. We provide evidence from a national survey of Canadian medical students about their opinions, intentions, and concerns about MAID. From October 2016 to July 2017, we distributed an anonymous online survey to all students at 15 of Canada’s 17 medical schools. The (...)
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  40.  29
    In the Business of Dying: Questioning the Commercialization of Hospice.Joshua E. Perry & Robert C. Stone - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):224-234.
    This article critically questions the commercialization of hospice care and the ethical concerns associated with the industry's movement toward “market-driven medicine” at the end of life. For example, the article examines issues raised by an influx of for-profit hospice providers whose business model appears at its core to have an ethical conflict of interest between shareholders doing well and terminal patients dying well. Yet, empirical data analyzing the experience of patients across the hospice industry are limited, and general claims (...)
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  41.  28
    This Moral Coil: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Canadian Medical Student Attitudes Toward Medical Assistance in Dying.Eli Xavier Bator, Bethany Philpott & Andrew Paul Costa - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):1-7.
    Background In February, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the ban on medical assistance in dying. In June, 2016, the federal government passed Bill C-14, permitting MAiD. Current medical students will be the first physician cohort to enter a system permissive of MAiD, and may help to ensure equitable access to care. This study assessed medical student views on MAiD, factors influencing these views, and opportunities for medical education. Methods An exploratory cross-sectional survey was developed and distributed (...)
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  42.  11
    Attitudes Towards Assisted Dying Are Influenced by Question Wording and Order: A Survey Experiment.Morten Magelssen, Magne Supphellen, Per Nortvedt & Lars Johan Materstvedt - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):24.
    BackgroundSurveys on attitudes towards assisted dying play an important role in informing public debate, policy and legislation. Unfortunately, surveys are often designed with insufficient attention to framing effects; that is, effects on the respondents’ stated attitudes caused by question wording and context. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and measure such framing effects.MethodsSurvey experiment in which an eight-question survey on attitudes towards assisted dying was distributed to Norwegian citizens through a web-based panel. Two variations of question (...)
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  43.  6
    Assessing Attitudes Towards Medical Assisted Dying in Canadian Family Medicine Residents: A Cross-Sectional Study.Aaron Wong, Amy T. Hsu & Peter Tanuseputro - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-8.
    Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada came into effect in 2016 with the passing of Bill C-14. As patient interest and requests for MAID continue to evolve in Canada, it is important to understand the attitudes of future providers and the factors that may influence their participation. Attitudes towards physician hastened death in general and the specific provision of MAID are unknown among Canadian residents. This study examined residents’ attitudes towards PHD and MAID, and identified factors that may influence (...)
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  44.  40
    Reclaiming the Patient's Voice and Spirit in Dying: An Insight From Israel.Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (3):134-144.
    In the latter half of the 20th century, Western medicine moved death from the home to the hospital. As a result, the process of dying seems to have lost its spiritual dimension, and become a matter of prolonging material life by means of medical technology. The novel quandaries that arose led in turn to medico-legal regulation. This paper describes the recent regulation of dying in Israel under its Dying Patient Law, 2005. The Law recognizes advance directives in (...)
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  45.  36
    A Role for Doctors in Assisted Dying? An Analysis of Legal Regulations and Medical Professional Positions in Six European Countries.G. Bosshard, B. Broeckaert, D. Clark, L. J. Materstvedt, B. Gordijn & H. C. Muller-Busch - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):28-32.
    Objectives: To analyse legislation and medical professional positions concerning the doctor’s role in assisted dying in western Europe, and to discuss their implications for doctors.Method: This paper is based on country-specific reports by experts from European countries where assisted dying is legalised , or openly practiced , or where it is illegal .Results: Laws on assisted dying in The Netherlands and Belgium are restricted to doctors. In principle, assisted suicide is not illegal in either Germany or Switzerland, (...)
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  46.  15
    Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention Into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery.Black Hawk Hancock & Daniel R. Morrison - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (6):659-678.
    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure—deep brain stimulation —which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop’s work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at (...)
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  47.  30
    The Impact on Patient Trust of Legalising Physician Aid in Dying.M. Hall - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (12):693-697.
    Objective: Little empirical evidence exists to support either side of the ongoing debate over whether legalising physician aid in dying would undermine patient trust.Design: A random national sample of 1117 US adults were asked about their level of agreement with a statement that they would trust their doctor less if “euthanasia were legal [and] doctors were allowed to help patients die”.Results: There was disagreement by 58% of the participants, and agreement by only 20% that legalising euthanasia would cause them (...)
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  48.  61
    Consensus Guidelines on Analgesia and Sedation in Dying Intensive Care Unit Patients.Laura Hawryluck, William Harvey, Louise Lemieux-Charles & Peter Singer - 2002 - BMC Medical Ethics 3 (1):1-9.
    Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given (...)
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  49.  26
    Morally-Relevant Similarities and Differences Between Assisted Dying Practices in Paradigm and Non-Paradigm Circumstances: Could They Inform Regulatory Decisions?Jeffrey Kirby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):475-483.
    There has been contentious debate over the years about whether there are morally relevant similarities and differences between the three practices of continuous deep sedation until death, physician-assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. Surprisingly little academic attention has been paid to a comparison of the uses of these practices in the two types of circumstances in which they are typically performed. A comparative domains of ethics analysis methodological approach is used in the paper to compare 1) the use of the three (...)
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  50.  11
    Continuing the Conversation About Medical Assistance in Dying.Carey DeMichelis, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Adam Rapoport - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):53-54.
    In their summary and critique, Gamble, Gamble, and Pruski mischaracterise both the central arguments and the primary objectives of our original paper. Our paper does not provide an ethical justification for paediatric Medical Assistance in Dying by comparing it with other end of life care options. In fact, it does not offer arguments about the permissibility of MAID for capable young people at all. Instead, our paper focuses on the ethical questions that emerged as we worked to develop a (...)
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