Results for 'Environmental movement'

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  1.  14
    The Environmental Movement and Labor in Global Capitalism: Lessons From the Case of the Headwaters Forest. [REVIEW]Alessandro Bonanno & Bill Blome - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (4):365-381.
    Employing the case of theredwood Headwaters forest in rural NorthernCalifornia, this paper investigates the extentto which an anti-corporate progressive alliancebetween labor and the environmental movement ispossible in contemporary global capitalism.Progressive alliances between labor and theenvironmental movement have been historicallydifficult. This has been particularly the casein the timber industry, where companies havebeen able to mobilize workers againstenvironmentalists' designs. The caseillustrates the events that led to the purchaseof the Headwaters Forest by the state ofCalifornia and the Federal Government fromPacific (...)
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  2.  1
    Turn Around and Step Forward: Ideology and Utopia in the Environmental Movement.Brian Treanor - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (1):27-46.
    Insufficiently radical environmentalism is inadequate to the problems that confront us; but overly radical environmentalism risks alienating people with whom, in a democracy, we must find common cause. Building on Paul Ricoeur’s work, which shows how group identity is constituted by the tension between ideology and utopia, this essay asks just how radical effective environmentalism should be. Two “case studies” of environmental agenda—that of Michael Schellenberger and Ted Nordhaus, and that of David Brower—serve to frame the important issues of (...)
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  3.  5
    Ableism and Disablism in the UK Environmental Movement.Deborah Fenney - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (4):503-522.
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  4. Murray Bookchin: Which Way for the Environmental Movement?R. A. Watson - 1995 - In Robert Elliot (ed.), Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 17--437.
     
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  5.  35
    Some Comments on the Rhetoric of the Environmental Movement.Ronald Hamowy - 1996 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 12 (1):161-177.
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  6. CA Bowers' The Culture of Denial: Why the Environmental Movement Needs a Strategy for Reforming Universities and Public Schools.E. Egginton - 2002 - Journal of Thought 37 (1):85-88.
  7. Marcuse's Ecological Critique and the American Environmental Movement.Tim Luke - 2004 - In John Abromeit & W. Mark Cobb (eds.), Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader. Routledge.
     
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  8.  9
    Beyond The Struggle For Proof: Factors Changing The Environmental Movement.Chris Rose - 1993 - Environmental Values 2 (4):285 - 298.
    Until the 1990s environmental non-governmental organizations focused on 'issues' to raise public awareness. Recently it appears that though awareness of environmental problems has increased, the high media profile and superficial 'greening' of politics and business have actually exacerbated people's feelings of helplessness and detachment. Greenpeace UK is currently addressing its strategies to counter this change.
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  9.  23
    A Wolf in the Garden: The Land Rights Movement and the New Environmental Debate.Gary E. Varner - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (4):441-443.
  10.  17
    Deconstructing the Dangerous Dogma of Denial: The Feminist-Environmental Justice Movement and its Flight From Overpopulation.M. Weld - 2012 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 12 (1):53-58.
  11.  4
    A Wolf in the Garden: The Land Rights Movement and the New Environmental Debate. [REVIEW]Gary E. Varner - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (4):441-443.
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  12.  5
    Qualitative Differences in Memory for Vista and Environmental Spaces Are Caused by Opaque Borders, Not Movement or Successive Presentation.Tobias Meilinger, Marianne Strickrodt & Heinrich H. Bülthoff - 2016 - Cognition 155:77-95.
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  13.  7
    Women and the Environmental Justice Movement in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.Omoyemen Odigie-Emmanuel - 2010 - In Irene Dankelman (ed.), Gender and Climate Change: An Introduction. Earthscan. pp. 247.
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  14.  3
    No Environmental Justice Movement in France? Controversy About Pollution in Two Southern French Industrial Towns.Christelle Gramaglia - 2014 - Analyse & Kritik 36 (2).
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  15. Mediated Intersections of Environmental and Decolonial Politics in the No Dakota Access Pipeline Movement.Alexandra Deem - forthcoming - Theory, Culture and Society:026327641880700.
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  16.  30
    Liberalism and the Two Directions of the Local Food Movement.Samantha Noll - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):211-224.
    The local food movement is, increasingly, becoming a part of the modern American landscape. However, while it appears that the local food movement is gaining momentum, one could question whether or not this trend is, in fact, politically and socially sustainable. Is local food just another trend that will fade away or is it here to stay? One way to begin addressing this question is to ascertain whether or not it is compatible with liberalism, a set of influential (...)
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  17.  33
    Changing Values: A Commentary on Hall.Lori Gruen, William Johnston & Clement Loo - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):142 - 144.
    We think Hall (2013) is correct in arguing that the environmental movement needs a stronger narrative and believe that such a narrative requires significant nuance. Hall rightly recognizes the importance of appropriately framing the current narratives appealed to by the environmental movement. They are too simplistic and, as such, misleading. The optimistic frames tend to ignore the real losses people experience in trying to live greener lifestyles. The ‘doom and gloom’ frames are apt to foster a (...)
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  18.  29
    Green History: A Reader in Environmental Literature, Philosophy, and Politics.Derek Wall - 1994 - Routledge.
    Charting the origins of the modern ecology movement over more than two thousand years, this volume gives a voice to those hidden from history, revealing "green" themes within artistic and scientific thought. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  19.  44
    Deliberative Democracy and the Environment.Graham Smith - 2003 - Routledge.
    One of the key questions to have exercised green political theorists in recent years concerns the relationship of the environment 'agenda' and democracy. Both environmentalists and democrats have a tendency to think of each other as natural bedfellows but in fact there is little theoretical or practical reason why they should be. Indeed some theorists have argued that the environmental movement has grown from fundamentally authoritarian roots and it is arguable that the only really effective way of implementing (...)
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  20. The Green Case: A Sociology of Environmental Issues, Arguments, and Politics.Steven Yearley - 1991 - Harpercollinsacademic.
  21. Environmental Pragmatism.Eric Katz & Andrew Light (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    Environmental pragmatism is a new strategy in environmental thought. It argues that theoretical debates are hindering the ability of the environmental movement to forge agreement on basic policy imperatives. This new direction in environmental thought moves beyond theory, advocating a serious inquiry into the merits of moral pluralism. Environmental pragmatism, as a coherent philosophical position, connects the methodology of classical American pragmatic thought to the explanation, solution and discussion of real issues. This concise, well-focused (...)
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  22. Postmodernism and the Environmental Crisis.Arran Gare - 1995 - London: Routledge.
    Postmodernism and the Environmental Crisis is the only book to combine cultural theory and environmental philosophy. In it, Arran Gare analyses the conjunction between the environmental crisis, the globalisation of capitalism and the disintegration of the culture of modernity. It explains the paradox of growing concern for the environment and the paltry achievements of environmental movements. Through a critique of the philosophies underlying approaches to the environmental crisis, Arran Gare puts forward his own, controversial theory (...)
  23.  69
    Organic Agriculture and the Conventionalization Hypothesis: A Case Study From West Germany. [REVIEW]Henning Best - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):95-106.
    The recent growth in organic farming has given rise to the so-called “conventionalization hypothesis,” the idea that organic farming is becoming a slightly modified model of conventional agriculture. Using survey data collected from 973 organic farmers in three German regions during the spring of 2004, some implications of the conventionalization hypothesis are tested. Early and late adopters of organic farming are compared concerning farm structure, environmental concern, attitudes to organic farming, and membership in organic-movement organizations. The results indicate (...)
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  24.  58
    Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement[REVIEW]Ana Delgado - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), (...)
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  25.  19
    Global Environmental Justice.Robert C. Robinson - 2018 - CHOICE 55 (8).
    The term “environmental justice” carries with it a sort of ambiguity. On the one hand, it refers to a movement of social activism in which those involved fight and argue for fairer, more equitable distribution of environmental goods and equal treatment of environmental duties. This movement is related to, and ideally informed by, the second use of the term, which refers to the academic discipline associated with legal regulations and theories of justice and ethics with (...)
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  26.  30
    Ethics, Philosophy and the Environment.Arran Gare - 2018 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 14 (3):219-240.
    Educated people everywhere now acknowledge that ecological destruction is threatening the future of civilization. While philosophers have concerned themselves with environmental problems, they appear to offer little to deal with this crisis. Despite this, I will argue that philosophy, and ethics, are absolutely crucial to overcoming this crisis. Philosophy has to recover its grand ambitions to achieve a comprehensive understanding of nature and the place of humanity within it, and ethics needs to be centrally concerned with the virtues required (...)
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  27. Ties That Bind: Native American Beliefs as a Foundation for Environmental Consciousness.Annie L. Booth & Harvey L. Jacobs - 1990 - Environmental Ethics 12 (1):27-43.
    In this article we examine the specific contributions Native American thought can make to the ongoing search for a Western ecological consciousness. We begin with a review of the influence of Native American beliefs on the different branches of the modem environmental movement and some initial comparisons of Western and Native American ways of seeing. We then review Native American thought on the natural world, highlighting beliefs in the need for reciprocity and balance, the world as a living (...)
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  28.  36
    The Precautionary Principle in Contemporary Environmental Politics.Timothy O'Riordan & Andrew Jordan - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (3):191-212.
    In its restless metamorphosis, the environmental movement captures ideas and transforms them into principles, guidelines and points of leverage. Sustainability is one such idea, now being reinterpreted in the aftermath of the 1992 Rio Conference. So too is the precautionary principle. Like sustainability, the precautionary principle is neither a well defined principle nor a stable concept. It has become the repository for a jumble of adventurous beliefs that challenge the status quo of political power, ideology and civil rights. (...)
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  29.  60
    Environmental Pragmatism and Environmental Philosophy.Lars Samuelsson - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (4):405-415.
    Environmental pragmatists have presented environmental pragmatism as a new philosophical position, arguing that theoretical debates in environmental philosophy are hindering the ability of the environmental movement to forge agreement on basic policy imperatives. Hence, they aim to lead environmental philosophers away from such theoretical debates, and toward more practical—and pragmatically motivated—ones. However, a position with such an aim is not a proper philosophical position at all, given that philosophy (among other things) is an effort (...)
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  30.  22
    The Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement 1960-2000?A Review.Bill Devall - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):18-41.
    Aarne Naess, in a seminal paper on environmental philosophy, distinguished between two streams of environmental philosophy and activism—shallow and deep. The deep, long-range ecology movement has developed over the past four decades on a variety of fronts. However, in the context of global conferences on development, population, and environment held during the 1990s, even shallow environmentalism seems to have less priority than demands for worldwide economic growth based on trade liberalization and a free market global economy.
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  31. Indigenous Rights and Environmental Justice.Roy W. Perrett - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (4):377-391.
    The modern environmental movement has a tradition of respect for indigenous cultures and many environmentalists believe that there are important ecological lessons to be learned from studying the traditional life styles of indigenous peoples. More recently, however, some environmentalists have become more sceptical. This scepticism has been sharpened by current concerns with the cause of indigenous rights. Indigenous peoples have repeatedly insisted on their rights to pursue traditional practices or to develop their lands, even when the exercise of (...)
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  32.  4
    Environmental Ethics and Linkola’s Ecofascism: An Ethics Beyond Humanism.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2014 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 9 (4):586-601.
    Ecofascism as a tradition in Environmental Ethics seems to burgeoning with potential. The roots of Ecofascism can be traced back to the German Romantic School, to the Wagnerian narration of the Nibelungen saga, to the works of Fichte and Herder and, finally, to the so-called völkisch movement. Those who take pride in describing themselves as ecofascists grosso modo tend to prioritize the moral value of the ecosphere, while, at the same time, they almost entirely devalue species and individuals. (...)
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  33.  53
    Ecotourism as Environmental Justice? Discourse and the Politics of Scale in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India.Keith Bosak - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):49-74.
    This paper uses the case of the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve to illustrate how ecotourism can be a vehicle for environmental justice. I use discourse analysis and the politics of scale to argue that an expanded notion of environmental justice does account for the myriad movements for resource rights occurring all over the world. In this case, framing the struggle through ecotourism with a focus on social justice provided local people a way to engage the mainstream environmental (...)
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  34.  45
    Private Property and Environmental Ethics:. Some New Directions.Benjamin Hale - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):402–421.
    This article argues that teachers of environmental ethics must more aggressively entertain questions of private property in their work and in their teaching. To make this case, it first introduces the three primary positions on property: occupation arguments, labor theory of value arguments, and efficiency arguments. It then contextualizes these arguments in light of the contemporary U.S. wise-use movement, in an attempt to make sense of the concerns that motivate wise-use activists, and also to demonstrate how intrinsic value (...)
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  35.  30
    Indian Rights and Environmental Ethics.O. Douglas Schwarz - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (4):291-302.
    The American environmental movement has a longstanding tradition of respect for American Indians. Recently, however, there has been a noticeable erosion of that tradition. The most volatile issues in the Indian/environmentalist controversey at present are those involving the right of many Indians to hunt and fish unrestricted by state or federal conservation regulations. Especially where endangered species areinvolved, some environmentalists have been quick to recommend that this unique privilege accorded to Indians be curtailed. While I share a deep (...)
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  36.  15
    Not Out of the Woods: Preserving the Human in Environmental Architecture.Andrew Light & Aurora Wallace - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (1):3 - 20.
    The North American environmental movement has historically sought to redress the depletion and degradation of natural resources that has been the legacy of the industrial revolution. Predominant in this approach has been the preservation of wilderness, conservation of species biodiversity and the restoration of natural ecosystems. While the results of such activity have often been commendable, several scholars have pointed out that the environmental movement has inherited an unfortunate bias against urban environments, and consequently, a blind (...)
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  37.  12
    The View From Princeton: American Perspectives on Environmental Values.Dale Jamieson - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):273-276.
    The origin of this special issue is in my experience as Laurence S. Rockefeller Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Since one of my duties at Princeton was to teach an undergraduate class, I decided to teach a course on Ethics and the Environment. The class was taught in the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs, and also cross-listed with the Philosophy Department. My suggestion that the course also be (...)
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  38.  9
    Sensible Environmental Principles for the Future.Gene Spitler - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (4):339-352.
    The attitudes of the American public toward the environmental movement may be undergoing change as the economic crunch continues and energy shortages reoccur. The principles underlying the environmental movement need to be defined and examined carefully to determine what makes sense for our changing conditions. In this paper an attempt is made to express the two primary ethical principles which have evolved from environmental thinking and, in turn, have influenced the directions taken by the (...). It is argued that these principles must not be accepted uncritically, but rather must be analyzed and subsequently modified to become compatible with more traditional ethical thinking. Such a synthesis is attempted in the paper. The modified principles can provide valuable guidance as we make difficult decisions which can influence the future path of life on Earth. (shrink)
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  39. The Political Economy of Environmental Movements: US Experience and Global Movements.Michael D. Everett & Robert Peplies - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (4):297-310.
    In 1972 a public choice model predicted that the incipient environmental movement in the United States would grow but encounter overwhelming industrial opposition. Twenty years later we find the model overstated this opposition. Environmental pressure groups were able to pass substantial legislation, resist counter forces, and reduce most targeted pollutants. A revised public choice model predicts that the success of the present global environmental movement depends on information flows between scientists and the public on the (...)
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  40. The Green Movement.Peggy J. Parks - 2012 - Referencepoint Press.
    What is the green movement? -- How has the green movement influenced environmental policies? -- Do the benefits of going green outweigh the costs? -- What is the future of the green movement?
     
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  41. Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2005 - Oup Usa.
    A leading international expert on environmental issues, Shrader-Frechette brings a new standard of rigor to philosophical discussions of environmental justice in her latest work. Observing that environmental activists often value environmental concerns over basic human rights, she points out the importance of recognising that minority groups and the poor in general are frequently the biggest victims of environmental degradation, a phenomenon with serious social and political implications that the environmental movement has failed to (...)
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  42.  16
    Environmental Ethics and Biomimetic Ethics: Nature as Object of Ethics and Nature as Source of Ethics.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):255-274.
    While the contemporary biomimicry movement is associated primarily with the idea of taking Nature as model for technological innovation, it also contains a normative or ethical principle—Nature as measure—that may be treated in relative isolation from the better known principle of Nature as model. Drawing on discussions of the principle of Nature as measure put forward by Benyus and Jackson, while at the same time situating these discussions in relation to contemporary debates in the philosophy of biomimicry : 364–387, (...)
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  43. Does the Sustainability Movement Sustain a Sustainable Design Ethic for Architecture?Tom Spector - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (3):265-283.
    The sustainability movement, currently gathering considerable attention from architects, derives much of its moral foundation from the theoretical initiatives of environmental ethics. How is the value of sustainability to mesh with architecture’s time-tested values? The idea that an ethic of sustainability might serve architects’ efforts to reground their practices in something that opposes consumer values of the marketplace has intuitive appeal and makes a certain amount of sense. However, it is far from obvious that the sustainability movement (...)
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  44.  15
    Poverty, Puritanism and Environmental Conflict.A. Brennan - 1998 - Environmental Values 7 (3):305-331.
    The paper proposes two ideas: (1) The wilderness preservation movement has failed to identify key elements involved in situations of environmental conflict. (2) The same movement seems unaware of its location within a tradition which is both elitist and Puritan. Holmes Rolston's recent work on the apparent conflict between feeding people and saving nature appears to exemplify the two points. With respect to point (1), Rolston's treatment fails to address the institutional and structural features which set the (...)
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  45.  9
    Environmental (in)Action in the Age of the World Picture.Peter Lucas - 2017 - In Antonio Cerella & Louiza Odysseos (eds.), Heidegger and the Global Age. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Over 20 years ago the Programme Director of Greenpeace UK identified the primary challenge facing the modern environmental movement as that of moving beyond the “struggle for proof” to generating effective environmental action. There is a mass of widely-accepted evidence to support environmentalist claims, but effective environmental action is rare, both at governmental and at grass-roots levels. Arguably, the malaise is less a political one than an ontological one. We “know” that environmental problems are “real”, (...)
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  46.  68
    Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil Rights Value Acceptable to All World Views.Troy W. Hartley - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):277-289.
    In accordance with environmental injustice, sometimes called environmental racism, minority communities are disproportionately subjected to a higher level of environmental risk than other segments of society. Growing concern over unequal environmental risk and mounting evidence of both racial and economic injustices have led to a grass-roots civil rights campaign called the environmental justice movement. The environmental ethics aspects of environmental injustice challenge narrow utilitarian views and promote Kantian rights and obligations. Nevertheless, an (...)
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  47. Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics.Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Earthcare: Readings and Cases in Environmental Ethics presents a diverse collection of writings from a variety of authors on environmental ethics, environmental science, and the environmental movement overall. Exploring a broad range of world views, religions and philosophies, David W. Clowney and Patricia Mosto bring together insightful thoughts on the ethical issues arising in various areas of environmental concern.
     
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  48. Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics.David Clowney & Patricia Mosto (eds.) - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Earthcare: Readings and Cases in Environmental Ethics presents a diverse collection of writings from a variety of authors on environmental ethics, environmental science, and the environmental movement overall. Exploring a broad range of world views, religions and philosophies, David W. Clowney and Patricia Mosto bring together insightful thoughts on the ethical issues arising in various areas of environmental concern.
     
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  49.  35
    Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy.Benjamin Howe - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the movement’s platform articulates (...)
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  50.  20
    Rhetoric, Environmentalism, and Environmental Ethics.Michael Bruner & Max Oelschlaeger - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):377-396.
    The growth of environmental ethics as an academic discipline has not been accompanied by any cultural movement toward sustainability. Indices of ecological degradation steadily increase, and many of the legislative gains made during the 1970s have been lost during the Reagan-Bush anti-environmental revolution. This situation gives rise to questions about the efficacy of ecophilosophical discourse. We argue (1) that these setbacks reflect, on the one hand, the skillful use of rhetorical tools by anti-environmental factions and, on (...)
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