Results for 'European poetry'

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  1.  36
    The Origins of Greek Poetic Language - West Indo-European Poetry and Myth. Pp. Xiv + 525. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £80. ISBN: 978-0-19-928075-9. [REVIEW]Gregory Nagy - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):333-338.
  2.  4
    A Revolution in European Poetry. 1660-1900.Emery Neff - 1941 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 1 (2):136-137.
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  3.  6
    Sarah Kay, Parrots and Nightingales: Troubadour Quotations and the Development of European Poetry. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013. Pp. 472; 9 Black- and-White Figures. $79.95. ISBN: 978-0-8122-4525-7. [REVIEW]Michelle Bolduc - 2016 - Speculum 91 (2):513-515.
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  4.  4
    Recent Tendencies In European Poetry.C. H. Herford - 1921 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 6 (1-2):115-141.
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  5.  12
    Literature (M.L.) West Indo-European Poetry and Myth. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv + 525. £80. 9780199280759. [REVIEW]Johannes Haubold - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:131-.
  6.  7
    Indo-European Poetry and Myth.Lowell Edmunds - 2010 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 103 (2):270-271.
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  7.  1
    The Poetry of Bohdan-Ihor Antonych and Zuzanna Ginczanka in the Context of European Modernism.Khrystyna Semeryn - 2019 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 6:177-190.
    This article compares the poetry of two prominent modern writers: Polish-Jewish poetess Zuzanna Ginczanka, and Ukrainian Lemko poet Bohdan-Ihor Antonych. They are believed to have certain poetic, stylistic, thematic, and literary similarities. The main discourses of their poetic imaginum mundi are studied with the use of a simple formula that includes five components. Tracing the interplay of nature, childhood, religion, and civilization in the development of an image of a holistic personality in their poetry, I analyze their common (...)
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  8.  3
    Philip Knox, Jonathan Morton, and Daniel Reeve, Eds., Medieval Thought Experiments: Poetry, Hypothesis, and Experience in the European Middle Ages. Turnhout: Brepols, 2018. Pp. Viii, 339; 3 Black-and-White Figures. €90. ISBN: 978-2-503-57621-3. [REVIEW]Alastair Minnis - 2020 - Speculum 95 (1):270-272.
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  9.  9
    A Poet Who Resist The Tradition And His Poetry: Cem Sultan’s European Eulogy.Bekir Çinar - 2007 - Journal of Turkish Studies 2:274-282.
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  10.  2
    Symbolic Meaning of Number in European Spiritual Poetry.L. N. Tatarinova - 2013 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 2 (1):49.
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  11.  15
    Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love After Aristotle.Jessica Rosenfeld - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: love after Aristotle; 1. Enjoyment: a medieval history; 2. Narcissus after Aristotle: love and ethics in Le Roman de la Rose; 3. Metamorphoses of pleasure in the fourteenth century Dit Amoureux; 4. Love's knowledge: fabliau, allegory, and fourteenth-century anti-intellectualism; 5. On human happiness: Dante, Chaucer, and the felicity of friendship; Coda: Chaucer's philosophical women.
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  12. On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy: A Guide for the Unruly.Gerald L. Bruns - 2006 - Fordham University Press.
    Marcel Duchamp once asked whether it is possible to make something that is not a work of art. This question returns over and over in modernist culture, where there are no longer any authoritative criteria for what can be identified (or excluded) as a work of art. As William Carlos Williams says, “A poem can be made of anything,” even newspaper clippings.At this point, art turns into philosophy, all art is now conceptual art, and the manifesto becomes the distinctive genre (...)
     
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  13.  8
    Poetry as Thought and Action: Mazzini's Reflections on Byron.Lilla Maria Crisafulli - 2012 - History of European Ideas 38 (3):387-398.
    Summary This article opens with a brief introduction to Giuseppe Mazzini, with particular reference to his commitment to republicanism, an ideal that would be fulfilled in Italy only after considerable time and with great difficulty. It then focuses on Mazzini's critical reception of Byron. Although Giuseppe Mazzini and Percy Bysshe Shelley would have allowed a more obvious comparison, it was Byron who really attracted Mazzini's attention and criticism. Mazzini uses Byron, on the one hand, as a means to demonstrate that (...)
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  14.  18
    Greek Poetry 2000–700 B.C.M. L. West - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (02):179-.
    They used to believe that mankind began in 4004 B.C. and the Greeks in 776. We now know that these last five thousand years during which man has left written record of himself are but a minute fraction of the time he has spent developing his culture. We now understand that the evolution of human society, its laws and customs, its economics, its religious practices, its games, its languages, is a very slow process, to be measured in millennia. In the (...)
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  15. The Unsaid: Hermetic Poetry Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction.Karl Simms - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Exploring hermeticism in English, American, and European poetry, this is the only book to discuss hermetic poetry from the Renaissance to the present day. This highly original study makes a significant theoretical advance in seeing the interpretation of hermetic poetry as a paradigm of understanding as such.
     
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  16.  48
    Poetry, Revisionism, Repression.Harold Bloom - 1975 - Critical Inquiry 2 (2):233-251.
    The strong word and stance issue only from a strict will, a will that dares the error of reading all of reality as a text, and all prior texts as openings for its own totalizing and unique interpretations. Strong poets present themselves as looking for truth in the world, searching in reality and in tradition, but such a stance, as Nietzsche said, remains under the mastery of desire, of instinctual drives. So, in effect, the strong poet wants pleasure and not (...)
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  17.  49
    The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes.Samuel Vriezen & Steve Pearce - 2012 - Continent 2 (1):22-28.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year (...)
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  18.  33
    Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos.Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei - 2011 - Continent 1 (3):201-207.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising (...)
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  19.  28
    The Exile of Literature: Poetry and the Politics of the Other.Bruce F. Murphy - 1990 - Critical Inquiry 17 (1):162-173.
    The marginality of poetry in American culture has been taken for granted at least since the dawn of the modernist period, when Walt Whitman printed his first volume of poetry at his own expense. More recently, it has become an article of faith that there is a real popular audience for poetry, but somewhere else-in the East. Literary journals, the popular press, and publishers have made household names of a handful of Eastern European writers: Czeslaw Milosz, (...)
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  20.  21
    Mandel'?Tam and Dante: TheDivine Comedy in Mandel'?Tam's Poetry of the 1930s.Marina Glazova - 1984 - Studies in Soviet Thought 28 (4):281-335.
    Osip Mandel'štam belongs among the greatest Russian poets of the twentieth century. During the thirties, when he led a tragic existence and felt a premonition of his inevitable violent death, Mandel'štam saw in Dante not only the greatest poet, but also his own superior teacher, and his poems of that period contain a tormented meditation on the masterpiece of Dante's genius -- the "Divine Comedy". Epic poetry of Dante, Homer, Virgil and others was possible because the inner world of (...)
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  21.  9
    Strict Form in Poetry: Would Jacob Wrestle with a Flabby Angel?Peter Viereck - 1978 - Critical Inquiry 5 (2):203-222.
    Poetry doesn't write about what it writes about. Critics may now agree that this tends to be so, but why? Is it, as here argued, inherently so because of poetry's two or more rhythm-levels? Or is it, as many "explicating" critics imply, noninherently and only recently so because of the two or more diction-levels of the symbolist heritage? If the answer to the latter question is no, then the explicators have brought us to a blind alley by being (...)
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  22. In Dark Again in Wonder: The Poetry of Rene Char and George Oppen.Robert Baker - 2012 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    At the center of_ In Dark Again in Wonder_ are readings of René Char and George Oppen. Both of these poets achieved recognition at a young age, Char among the French surrealists in the 1930s, Oppen among the American objectivists in the same decade. Both were independent individuals who, having found their way to communities of inventive writers, stepped back and shaped their own idiosyncratic paths. Both responded decisively to the social upheavals of the 1930s and ‘40s. Oppen committed himself (...)
     
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  23.  7
    Orpheus with His Lute: Poetry and the Renewal of Life.Elisabeth Henry - 1992 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    This book defines, through a survey of the European tradition of literature, art, poetry, and music, some of the philosophical and psychological implications and developments of that myth.
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  24.  20
    The Beginnings of European Theorizing--Reflexivity in the Archaic Age.Barry Sandywell - 1996 - Routledge.
    In Reflexivity and the Crisis of Western Reason Barry Sandywell outlined and defended a central place for reflexivity in the human sciences. In this second equally outstanding and challenging volume of Logological Investigations, he reconstructs the origins of "European" reflection. The author's central claim is that the world does not exist independently of us, but that it is constituted through the terms of our discursive categories. Rather than research being a triumphant exploration, it is more fully understood as agonized (...)
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  25. Poetics of Modernity: Toward a Hermeneutic Imagination.Richard Kearney - 1995 - Humanities Press.
  26.  14
    Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic.James H. Donelan - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    James H. Donelan describes how two poets, a philosopher, and a composer - Hölderlin, Wordsworth, Hegel, and Beethoven - developed an idea of self-consciousness based on music at the turn of the nineteenth century. This idea became an enduring cultural belief: the understanding of music as an ideal representation of the autonomous creative mind. Against a background of political and cultural upheaval, these four major figures - all born in 1770 - developed this idea in both metaphorical and actual musical (...)
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  27. Authorship Revisited: Conceptions of Authorship Around 1900 and 2000.G. J. Dorleijn, Ralf Grüttemeier & Liesbeth Korthals Altes (eds.) - 2010 - Peeters.
     
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  28.  25
    Philosophy, Poetry, Parataxis.Jonathan Monroe - 2009 - The European Legacy 14 (5):599-611.
    At the heart of the relationship between philosophy and poetry, and of the philosophical and the literary tout court, is the relationship between poetry and prose. In the increasingly influential work of Giorgio Agamben, whose impact continues to grow across a wide range of disciplines, the relationship between philosophy and poetry, poetry and prose, receives renewed attention and significance. Situating Agamben's philosophical, poetic prose in relation to the legacy of the prose poem from Charles Baudelaire through (...)
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  29.  24
    From Modernism to Postmodernism, American Poetry and Theory in the Twentieth Century.J. Ashton - forthcoming - History of European Ideas.
    In this overview of twentieth-century American poetry, Jennifer Ashton examines the relationship between modernist and postmodernist American poetics. Ashton moves between the iconic figures of American modernism - Stein, Williams, Pound - and developments in contemporary American poetry to show how contemporary poetics, specially the school known as language poetry, have attempted to redefine the modernist legacy. She explores the complex currents of poetic and intellectual interest that connect contemporary poets with their modernist forebears. The works..
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  30.  31
    Pragmatism Vs. Postmodernism: The Struggle Between Philosophy and Poetry.Amy McLaughlin & Daniel White - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (2):233 - 239.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 2, Page 233-239, April 2012.
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  31.  40
    The Artist as Transgressor in Mandel'štam's Poetry.Marina Glazova - 1988 - Studies in East European Thought 36 (1-2):1-61.
    In Mandel'tam's writing, artistic creativity is described as based on the indispensable yet contradictory modes of compliance and deviation. The artist, by his artistic nature, must be an obedient disciple to the tradition that inspires him, and, at the same time, a violator who renders what inspires him in an individual form. Thus, art implies iterability through novelty. In the totalitarian state, this double nature of art acquires a sinister context and brings the artist to an unavoidable conflict with the (...)
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  32.  32
    Mandel'štam and Dante: Thedivine Comedy in Mandel'štam's Poetry of the 1930s.Marina Glazova - 1984 - Studies in East European Thought 28 (4):281-335.
    Osip Mandel''tam (1891–1938?) belongs among the greatest Russian poets of the twentieth century. During the thirties, when he led a tragic existence and felt a premonition of his inevitable violent death, Mandel''tam saw in Dante not only the greatest poet, but also his own superior teacher, and his poems of that period contain a tormented meditation on the masterpiece of Dante''s genius — theDivine Comedy.Epic poetry of Dante, Homer, Virgil and others was possible because the inner world of each (...)
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  33.  22
    Arion's Lyre: Archaic Lyric Into Hellenistic Poetry. By Benjamin Acosta-Hughes.Flora P. Manakidou - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (4):550 - 551.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 4, Page 550-551, July 2012.
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  34.  2
    Herder's Hermeneutics: History, Poetry, Enlightenment by Kristin Gjesdal. , Xiv + 231 Pp., $99.99 Cloth, ISBN: 9781316285770. [REVIEW]Benjamin Crowe - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (2):524-527.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  35. The Power of the Image: Vaclav Havel's Visual Poetry.P. Steiner - 2007 - Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aestetics; Until 2008: Estetika (Aesthetics) 44 (1-4).
    The author seeks here to link Havel’s well-known dramatic output with his visual poetry, which is far less known. The notion of the double bind, the author argues, is a predominant trope of Havel’s oeuvre. By applying Grelling’s paradox to Havel’s visual texts, the author illustrates the techniques Havel uses to produce logograms whose visual representation contradicts the verbal message conveyed by them.
     
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  36. Poeta Calculans: Harsdorffer, Leibniz, and the "Mathesis Universalis".Jan C. Westerhoff - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):449.
    This paper seeks to indicate some connections between a major philosophi- cal project of the seventeenth century, the conception of a mathesis universalis, and the practice of baroque poetry. I shall argue that these connections consist in a peculiar view of language and systems of notation which was particularly common in European baroque culture and which provided the necessary conceptual background for both poetry and the mathesis universalis.
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  37.  39
    Slanted Truths: The Gay Science as Nietzsche's Ars Poetica.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - Evental Aesthetics 5 (1):98-117.
    This essay derives its focus on poetry from the subtitle of Die Fröhliche Wissenschaft: “la gaya scienza.” Nietzsche appropriated this phrase from the phrase “gai saber” used by the Provençal knight-poets (or troubadours) of the eleventh through thirteenth centuries — the first lyric poets of the European languages — to designate their Ars Poetica or “art of poetry.” I will begin with an exploration of Nietzsche’s treatment of poets and poetry as a subject matter, closely analyzing (...)
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  38.  24
    Insights Into Professional Identity Formation in Medicine: Memoirs and Poetry.Hedy S. Wald - 2011 - The European Legacy 16 (3):377-384.
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  39.  21
    Shelley’s “Letter to Maria Gisborne” as Workshop Poetry.Steven E. Jones - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (3-4):380-395.
    ABSTRACTShelley’s “Letter to Maria Gisborne” is a playful improvisational verse epistle, widely praised for its urbanity and its display of the poet’s invention. The verses turn on a catalogue of the collection of odd scientific and mechanical objects that Shelley found scattered around him in the place he composed the letter, the Livorno workshop of Gisborne’s son, a young engineer who was building a new-model steamboat at the time. In the context of that space, the poem reads as a response (...)
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  40.  1
    Aleksey Khomyakov’s Unknown Essay on the Austrian Slavs (1845) and His Poetry: The Interplay of Historiosophical Ideas and Poetic Prophetism.Andrey P. Dmitriyev - forthcoming - Studies in East European Thought.
  41. Donne, Castiglione, and the Poetry of Courtliness. By Peter DeSa Wiggins.W. S. H. Lim - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (5):531.
     
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  42.  23
    Religion as Poetry: The Catholic Imagination According to Andrew Greeley.Ingrid H. Shafer - 1996 - The European Legacy 1 (4):1515-1521.
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  43.  28
    Semantic Palaeontology and the Passage From Myth to Science and Poetry: The Work of Izrail' Frank-Kamenetskij. [REVIEW]Craig Brandist - 2011 - Studies in East European Thought 63 (1):43-61.
    The life and career of the Soviet scholar of myth and religion Izrail' Grigor'evic Frank -Kamenetskij is discussed, tracing his development from a scholar working exclusively on semitology to a theorist of myth and literature. The scholar's relationship to German philosophy and Biblical scholarship is outlined, along with his relationship to Soviet scholarship of the 1920s and 1930s. The development of the scholar's work is related to his encounter with N. Ja. Marr in the early 1920s, and the way in (...)
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  44.  20
    Poetry and Philosophy: Plato’s Spirit and Literary Criticism.James Muir - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (3):403-406.
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  45.  20
    The Poetry of the Un-Enlightened: Politics and Literary Enthusiasm in the Early Eighteenth Century.Abigail Williams - 2005 - History of European Ideas 31 (2):299-311.
    This paper will explore the notion of ‘poetic enthusiasm’ in early 18th-century verse. The representation of poetic enthusiasm—the claim to false inspiration, and the fanaticism that was perceived to accompany it—was frequently politicized in this period. Through a conflation of religious and literary discourses, poetic enthusiasm was seen to represent the sae kind of anarchy in the realm of literature that the religious enthusiasm associated with Dissent did in the context of the established church. This paper will establish first of (...)
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  46.  19
    The Eventful Marriage of Philosophy and Poetry.Amiya Bhushan Sharma - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (5):635-639.
  47.  17
    Poetry: The Ultimate Guide. By Richard Bradford.Lisa M. Steinman - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (6):853-854.
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  48.  15
    The Peacock and the Buffalo: The Poetry of Nietzsche. Translated.Eberhard Eichenhofer - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (5):658-659.
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  49.  14
    The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.Herman Rapaport - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (1):92-95.
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  50.  16
    Joseph Acquisto. French Symbolist Poetry and the Idea of Music (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2006), Viii+ 193 Pp.£ 50.00 Cloth. Dawn Ades and Simon Baker. Undercover Surrealism: Georges Bataille and Documents (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006), 272 Pp. $38.00 Paper. Alain Badiou. Briefings on Existence: A Short Treatise on Transitory Ontology (Albany. [REVIEW]Carollee Bengelsdorf, Margaret Cerullo & Yogesh Chandrani - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (5):659-661.
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