Results for 'Free thought'

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  1. Publisher's Note: Subscribe to ME Sharpe's Asian Studies Journals and Receive FREE Online Access to the Complete Archives. Special Discount Prices Available.Contemporary Chinese Thought - 2013 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (3):86.
  2. The Limits of the Rights to Free Thought and Expression.Barrett Emerick - forthcoming - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal.
    It is often held that people have a moral right to believe and say whatever they want. For instance, one might claim that they have a right to believe racist things as long as they keep those thoughts to themselves. Or, one might claim that they have a right to pursue any philosophical question they want as long as they do so with a civil tone. In this paper I object to those claims and argue that no one has such (...)
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  3. French Free Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire.John Stephenson Spink - 1960 - New York: Greenwood Press.
  4.  2
    Free-Thought in the Social Sciences.J. A. Hobson - 1926 - Allen & Unwin.
  5.  13
    Sapienti Os in Corde, Stulto Cor in Ore Esse – Johann Gottlieb Heineccius on Natural Duties Concerning Free Thought and Free Speech.Katerina Mihaylova - forthcoming - In Frank Grunert & Knud Haakonssen (eds.), Love as the Principle of Natural Law. The Natural Law Theory of Johann Gottlieb Heineccius and its Contexts. Leiden, Niederlande:
    In his "Elementa Iuris Naturae et Gentium" Johann Gottlieb Heineccius presents a unique account of love as the principle of natural law, referring to the main concern of early modern protestant theories of natural law: the importance of securing subjective rights by a law. Heineccius accepts the universal character of subjective rights derived from human nature, claiming their protection as natural duties required by a law. This chapter provides an attempt to explain the specific ways in which Heineccius deals with (...)
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  6.  36
    The Step to Rationality: The Efficacy of Thought Experiments in Science, Ethics, and Free Will.Roger N. Shepard - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (1):3-35.
  7.  43
    Free Thought in the Social Sciences.Moorhouse F. X. Millar - 1926 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 1 (1):183-186.
  8.  16
    French Free Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. [REVIEW]M. W. J. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (1):196-196.
    A richly detailed history of French secular thought in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. A wealth of material is introduced from unpublished manuscripts. Spink's stress on the clandestine spread of the enlightenment, in spite of official suppression, is interesting and sobering.--J. M. W.
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  9. Free Thought and Free Trade: The Analogy Between Scientific and Entrepreneurial Discovery Process.Pamela J. Brown - 1987 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 8 (2):289-92.
     
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  10.  32
    Free Will And The Problem Of Evil: Reconciling Rousseau's Divided Thought.Robin Douglass - 2010 - History of Political Thought 31 (4):639-655.
    This article aims to resolve the apparent contradiction in Rousseau's oeuvre concerning the origin of man's evil. In the Second Discourse a naturalistic explanation for the development of evil is given, whereas in Emile the Savoyard Vicar propounds a deontological account. The two can be reconciled, however, through a precise understanding of the nature and bearing of Rousseau's conception of free will. The analysis challenges O'Hagan's interpretation and suggests that the irreducible tensions within Rousseau's thought can be resolved (...)
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  11.  95
    The Myth of Renaissance Atheism and the French Tradition of Free Thought.Paul Oskar Kristeller - 1968 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (3):233-243.
  12.  50
    The Dogmas of Free Thought.G. K. Chesterton - 2010 - The Chesterton Review 36 (1/2):18-25.
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  13.  25
    An Open Letter on the Failure of Free Thought.G. K. Chesterton - 2007 - The Chesterton Review 33 (3/4):445-449.
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  14.  13
    The Right of Free Thought in Matters of Religion.Frank Granger - 1903 - International Journal of Ethics 14 (1):16-26.
  15.  8
    A Short History of Free Thought. John M. Robertson.Carveth Read - 1907 - International Journal of Ethics 17 (4):513-517.
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  16.  18
    French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. By J. S. Spink. (University of London, The Athlone Press, 1960. Pp. Ix + 345. Price 50s.). [REVIEW]Ian W. Alexander - 1962 - Philosophy 37 (142):369-.
  17.  7
    French Free Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. J. S. Spink.Leonard M. Marsak - 1962 - Isis 53 (2):263-263.
  18.  5
    A Survey of Free Thought [Review of Paul Edwards, God and the Philosophers].Chad Trainer - 2009 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 29 (1).
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  19.  6
    The Right of Free Thought in Matters of Religion.Frank Granger - 1903 - International Journal of Ethics 14 (1):16-26.
  20.  8
    The Libertine's Two Bodies: Moral Persona and Free Thought in Early Modern Europe.Martin Mulsow - 2008 - Intellectual History Review 18 (3):337-347.
  21.  8
    Book Review:Free Thought in the Social Sciences. J. A. Hobson. [REVIEW]D. B. C. - 1926 - Ethics 36 (4):430-.
  22.  5
    Book Review:A Short History of Free Thought. John M. Robertson. [REVIEW]Carveth Read - 1907 - Ethics 17 (4):513-.
  23.  5
    Book Review: On Dialogue: An Essay in Free Thought[REVIEW]Robert Grudin - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1).
  24.  3
    Free Thought in the Social Sciences.J. A. Hobson - 1926 - International Journal of Ethics 36 (4):430-431.
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  25.  3
    A Short History of Free Thought.John M. Robertson - 1907 - International Journal of Ethics 17 (4):513-517.
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  26.  4
    Lest We Forget: Free-Thought and the Environment.Kile Jones - 2010 - Human Affairs 20 (4):294-299.
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  27.  7
    Book Review: On Dialogue: An Essay in Free Thought[REVIEW]Michael L. Hall - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):181-184.
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  28.  5
    Free-Thought in the Social Sciences. By J. A. Hobson.A. D. Lindsay - 1927 - Philosophy 2 (6):259.
  29. HOBSON, J. A. -Free Thought in the Social Sciences. [REVIEW]P. V. M. Benecke - 1926 - Mind 35:511.
  30. Heterodoxy, Spinozism, and Free Thought in Early-Eighteenth-Century Europe Studies on the Traité des Trois Imposteurs.Silvia Berti, Richard Henry Popkin & Françoise Charles-Daubert - 1996
     
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  31. Paris and Amsterdam, Traditionalism and Free-Thought in 2 Different Editions of The'journal Des Scavans'+ 18th-Century Discussions of Locke. [REVIEW]E. Caruso - 1987 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 42 (3):439-464.
     
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  32. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus a Critical Inquiry Into the History, Purpose and Authenticity of the Hebrew Scriptureswith the Right to Free Thought and Free Discussion Asserted, and Shown to Be Not Only Consistent but Necessarily Bound Up with True Pie.Benedictus de Spinoza & Robert Willis - 1862 - Trübner.
     
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  33. SPINK J. S., "French Free-Thought from Gassendi to Voltaire". [REVIEW]L. Formigari - 1962 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 16:269.
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  34. The Right of Free Thought in Matters of Religion.Frank Granger - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13:97.
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  35. Free-Thought in the Social Sciences.J. A. Hobson - 1927 - Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (6):259-261.
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  36. Free Thought in the Social Sciences. By C. D. Burns. [REVIEW]J. A. Hobson - 1925 - Ethics 36:430.
  37. New Threats to Free Thought.Jonathan Ranch - forthcoming - Ethics, Information, and Technology: Readings.
  38. A Short History of Free Thought, by John M. Robertson. [REVIEW]Carveth Read - 1906 - Ethics 17:513.
     
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  39. SPINK, J. S. - "French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire". [REVIEW]L. J. Russell - 1962 - Mind 71:125.
  40. Liberalism as Free Thought.John Skorupski - unknown
    John Stuart Mill is the philosopher of liberalism. Or so some people think. Others disagree; they may give that status to Locke, or (perhaps) to Kant. Or they may think the question frivolous and insist – boringly but, I cannot deny, sensibly – that no one thinker is the philosopher of liberalism.
     
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  41.  94
    Context of Thought and Context of Utterance: A Note on Free Indirect Discourse and the Historical Pr.Philippe Schlenker - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (3):279-304.
    Based on the analysis of narrations in Free Indirect Discourse and the Historical Present, we argue that the grammatical notion of context of speech should be ramified into a Context of Thought and a Context of Utterance. Tense and person depend on the Context of Utterance, while all other indexicals are evaluated with respect to the Context of Thought. Free Indirect Discourse and the Historical Present are analyzed as special combinatorial possibilities that arise when the two (...)
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  42. Voice and Expressivity in Free Indirect Thought Representations: Imitation and Representation.Diane Blakemore - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (5):579-605.
    This article addresses issues in the philosophy of fiction from the perspective of a relevance theoretic approach to communication: first, how should we understand the notion of ‘voice’ as it is used in the analysis of free indirect style narratives; and, second, in what sense can the person responsible for free indirect representations of fictional characters' thoughts be regarded as a communicator? The background to these questions is the debate about the roles of pretence and attribution in (...) indirect style. I argue that the role of expressives in sustaining the illusion that fictional characters speak their inner thoughts suggests that ‘voice’ should be understood in two distinct ways. On the one hand, there are cases in which the use of expressive devices leads to the formation of thoughts which are understood to resemble other (attributed) thoughts. On the other hand, there are other cases in which expressives are used as a means of simulating a fictional character's behaviour or style. At the same time, I argue that in order to accommodate free indirect thought representation in a relevance theoretic model of communication, the responsibility for ensuring that the effort of processing the text will be rewarded by optimal relevance must be decoupled from the point of view that is being represented. While the (constructed) author is responsible for orchestrating our interpretation of free indirect thought representations so that the effort of processing will result in optimal relevance, the reader does not necessarily assume this function is being performed by someone who intends to communicate their own thoughts: the relevance of the act of narration may instead lie in the sense of mutuality achieved between reader and character. (shrink)
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  43. Origins of the Notion of Free Will in Ancient Thought.P. Labuda - 2011 - Filozofia 66:928-934.
    The paper deals with free will as discussed in the recent book of Michael Frede A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought. Besides a close view on the structure of Fredes’s main ideas and arguments, the paper aims to provide a critical discussion of Frede’s view of St. Augustine’s contribution to the development of the notion of free will. This would enable us to explore and re-think the historical and philosophical conditions of the (...)
     
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  44. A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Review). [REVIEW]Susanne Bobzien - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):292-293.
    Much of chapters 2 to 6 of this book is in agreement with publications from the last twenty years (including those of the reviewer); so for example Frede’s points that neither Aristotle nor the Stoics had a notion of free-will; that in Epictetus (for the first time) the notions of freedom and will were combined; that an indeterminist notion of free-will occurs first in Alexander. The achievement of these chapters lies in the way Frede carefully joins them together (...)
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  45.  79
    Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems, Free Will and Mathematical Thought.Solomon Feferman - 2011 - In Richard Swinburne (ed.), Free Will and Modern Science. Oup/British Academy.
    The determinism-free will debate is perhaps as old as philosophy itself and has been engaged in from a great variety of points of view including those of scientific, theological, and logical character. This chapter focuses on two arguments from logic. First, there is an argument in support of determinism that dates back to Aristotle, if not farther. It rests on acceptance of the Law of Excluded Middle, according to which every proposition is either true or false, no matter whether (...)
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  46. Free Will and Predestination in Iislamic Thought: Theoretical Compromises in the Works of Avicenna, Ghazali and Ibn Arabi.Maria De Cillis - 2014 - Routledge.
  47.  13
    Necessity and Free Will in the Thought of Bardaisan of Edessa.Tim Hegedus - 2003 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 59 (2):333-344.
    We examine here how the Syrian philosopher and theologian Bardaisan conciliates necessary fate and free will in man. Our study is based on an examination of the Book of the Laws of Countries, a dialogue on free will and astral fate, featuring Bardaisan, a few of his disciples and an opponent. Résumé Cet article examine la manière dont le philosophe et théologien syrien Bardesane concilie la nécessité du destin et le libre arbitre de l’homme. L’étude est menée sur (...)
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  48. A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought.A. A. Long (ed.) - 2011 - University of California Press.
    Where does the notion of free will come from? How and when did it develop, and what did that development involve? In Michael Frede's radically new account of the history of this idea, the notion of a free will emerged from powerful assumptions about the relation between divine providence, correctness of individual choice, and self-enslavement due to incorrect choice. Anchoring his discussion in Stoicism, Frede begins with Aristotle--who, he argues, had no notion of a free will--and ends (...)
     
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  49. How Can a Man Be Free? Spinoza's Thought and That of Some Others.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1995 - Aletheia 7:21.
     
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  50. Reviews : Phyllis Grosskurth, Melanie Klein: Her World and Her Work, London: Maresfield Library, H. Karnac (Books), 1989 (1985), Paper £14.95, X + 515 Pp. Nini Herman, My Kleinian Home: A Journey Through Four Psychotherapies, London: Free Association Books, 1988, Paper £9.95, 163 Pp. R. D. Hinshelwood, A Dictionary of Kleinian Thought, London: Free Association Books, 1989, £30.00, 482 Pp. Juliet Mitchell (Ed.), The Selected Melanie Klein, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1986, Paper £5.99, 256 Pp. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Wright - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):294-296.
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