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Profile: Brian Leiter (University of Chicago)
  1. Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2014 - Routledge.
    Both an introduction to Nietzsche’s moral philosophy, and a sustained commentary on his most famous work, _On the Genealogy of Morality_, this book has become the most widely used and debated secondary source on these topics over the past dozen years. Many of Nietzsche’s most famous ideas - the "slave revolt" in morals, the attack on free will, perspectivism, "will to power" and the "ascetic ideal" - are clearly analyzed and explained. The first edition established the centrality of naturalism to (...)
     
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  2. Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2002/2014 - Routledge.
    Both an introduction to Nietzsche’s moral philosophy, and a sustained commentary on his most famous work, On the Genealogy of Morality, this book has become the most widely used and debated secondary source on these topics over the past dozen years. Many of Nietzsche’s most famous ideas - the "slave revolt" in morals, the attack on free will, perspectivism, "will to power" and the "ascetic ideal" - are clearly analyzed and explained. The first edition established the centrality of naturalism to (...)
     
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  3. Naturalizing Jurisprudence: Essays on American Legal Realism and Naturalism in Legal Philosophy.Brian Leiter - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: From legal realism to naturalized jurisprudence -- A note on legal indeterminacy -- Part I. American legal realism and its critics -- Rethinking legal realism: toward a naturalized jurisprudence (1997) -- Legal realism and legal positivism reconsidered (2001) -- Is there an "American" jurisprudence? (1997) -- Postscript to Part I: Interpreting legal realism -- Part II. Ways of naturalizing jurisprudence -- Legal realism, hard positivism, and the limits of conceptual analysis (1998, 2001) -- Why Quine is not a postmodernist (...)
     
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  4.  61
    Naturalizing Jurisprudence.Brian Leiter - 2009 - In John R. Shook & Paul Kurtz (eds.), The Future of Naturalism. Humanity Books.
    General jurisprudence-that branch of legal philosophy concerned with the nature of law and adjudication-has been relatively unaffected by the "naturalistic" strains so evident, for example, in the epistemology, philosophy of mind and moral philosophy of the past forty years. This paper sketches three ways in which naturalism might affect jurisprudential inquiry. The paper serves as a kind of precis of the main themes in my book NATURALIZING JURISPRUDENCE: ESSAYS ON AMERICAN LEGAL REALISM AND NATURALISM IN LEGAL PHILOSOPHY (Oxford University Press, (...)
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  5.  55
    Why Tolerate Religion?Brian Leiter - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    "--Christopher L. Eisgruber, Princeton University "This is a provocative and bracing essay, one that is bound to stimulate much discussion.
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  6.  52
    Explaining Theoretical Disagreement.Brian Leiter - manuscript
    Shapiro has recently argued that Dworkin posed a new objection to legal positivism in Law's Empire, to which positivists, he says, have not adequately responded. Positivists, the objection goes, have no satisfactory account of what Dworkin calls “theoretical disagreement” about law, that is, disagreement about “the grounds of law” or what positivists would call the criteria of legal validity. I agree with Shapiro that the critique is new, and disagree that it has not been met. Positivism can not offer an (...)
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  7. The Future for Philosophy.Brian Leiter (ed.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Where does philosophy, the oldest academic subject, stand at the beginning of the new millennium? This remarkable volume brings together leading figures from most major branches of the discipline to offer answers. What remains of the "linguistic turn" in twentieth-century philosophy? How should moral philosophy respond to and incorporate developments in empirical psychology? Where might Continental and Anglophone feminist theory profitably interact? How has our understanding of ancient philosophy been affected by the emergence of analytic philosophy? Where does the mind-body (...)
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  8.  92
    The Case for Nietzschean Moral Psychology.Joshua Knobe & Brian Leiter - 2007 - In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary moral psychology has been dominated by two broad traditions, one usually associated with Aristotle, the other with Kant. The broadly Aristotelian approach emphasizes the role of childhood upbringing in the development of good moral character, and the role of such character in ethical behavior. The broadly Kantian approach emphasizes the role of freely chosen conscious moral principles in ethical behavior. We review a growing body of experimental evidence that suggests that both of these approaches are predicated on an implausible (...)
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  9. Moral Facts and Best Explanations.Brian Leiter - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):79.
    Do moral properties figure in the best explanatory account of the world? According to a popular realist argument, if they do, then they earn their ontological rights, for only properties that figure in the best explanation of experience are real properties. Although this realist strategy has been widely influential—not just in metaethics, but also in philosophy of mind and philosophy of science—no one has actually made the case that moral realism requires: namely, that moral facts really will figure in the (...)
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  10.  82
    Why Evolutionary Biology is (so Far) Irrelevant to Legal Regulation.Brian Leiter & Michael Weisberg - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (1):31-74.
    Evolutionary biology – or, more precisely, two (purported) applications of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, namely, evolutionary psychology and what has been called human behavioral biology – is on the cusp of becoming the new rage among legal scholars looking for interdisciplinary insights into the law. We argue that as the actual science stands today, evolutionary biology offers nothing to help with questions about legal regulation of behavior. Only systematic misrepresentations or lack of understanding of the relevant biology, (...)
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  11. Legal Realism and Legal Positivism Reconsidered.Brian Leiter - 2001 - Ethics 111 (2):278-301.
  12. Legal Positivism.Jules L. Coleman & Brian Leiter - 1996 - In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
     
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  13. Nietzsche's Metaethics: Against the Privilege Readings.Brian Leiter - 2000 - European Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):277–297.
  14.  14
    Beyond the Hart/Dworkin Debate: The Methodology Problem in Jurisprudence.B. Leiter - 2003 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):17-51.
  15. Nietzsche's Theory of the Will.Brian Leiter - 2007 - Philosophers' Imprint 7 (7):1-15.
    The essay offers a philosophical reconstruction of Nietzsche’s theory of the will, focusing on (1) Nietzsche’s account of the phenomenology of “willing” an action, the experience we have which leads us (causally) to conceive of ourselves as exercising our will; (2) Nietzsche’s arguments that the experiences picked out by the phenomenology are not causally connected to the resulting action (at least not in a way sufficient to underwrite ascriptions of moral responsibility); and (3) Nietzsche’s account of the actual causal genesis (...)
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  16. Nietzsche.John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    The latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Philosophy series, this work brings together some of the best and most influential recent philosophical scholarship on Nietzsche. Opening with a substantial introduction by John Richardson, it covers: Nietzsche's views on truth and knowledge, his 'doctrines' of the eternal recurrence and will to power, his distinction between Apollinian and Dionysian art, his critique of morality, his conceptions of agency and self-creation, and his genealogical method. For each of these issues, the papers show (...)
     
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  17.  75
    Nietzsche and Morality.Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume capitalizes on a growth of interest in Nietzsche's work on morality from two sides -- from scholars of the history of philosophy and from ...
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  18. Moral Skepticism and Moral Disagreement in Nietzsche.Brian Leiter - unknown
    This essay offers a new interpretation of Nietzsche's argument for moral skepticism (i.e., the metaphysical thesis that there do not exist any objective moral properties or facts), an argument that should be of independent philosophical interest as well. On this account, Nietzsche offers a version of the argument from moral disagreement, but, unlike familiar varieties, it does not purport to exploit anthropological reports about the moral views of exotic cultures, or even garden-variety conflicting moral intuitions about concrete cases. Nietzsche, instead, (...)
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  19.  59
    Normativity For Naturalists.Brian Leiter - 2015 - Philosophical Issues 25 (1):64-79.
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  20. Naturalism and Naturalized Jurisprudence.Brian Leiter - 1998 - In Brian Bix (ed.), Analyzing Law: New Essays in Legal Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 79.
     
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  21.  12
    The Demarcation Problem in Jurisprudence: A New Case for Scepticism.Brian Leiter - 2011 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (4):663-677.
    Legal philosophers have been preoccupied with specifying the differences between two systems of normative guidance that are omnipresent in all modern human societies: law and morality. Positivists propose a solution to this ‘Demarcation Problem’ according to which the legal validity of a norm cannot depend on its being morally valid, either in all or at least some possible legal systems. The proposed analysis purports to specify the essential and necessary features of law in virtue of which this is true. Yet, (...)
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  22.  24
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2002 - Routledge.
    Nietzsche is one of the most important and controversial thinkers in the history of philosophy. His writings on moral philosophy are among the most widely read works in philosophy- many of his ideas are both startling and disturbing.
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  23.  20
    Moralities Are a Sign-Language of the Affects.Brian Leiter - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):237-258.
    This essay offers an interpretation and partial defense of Nietzsche's idea that moralities and moral judgments are or of our affects, that is, of our emotions or feelings. According to Nietzsche, as I reconstruct his view, moral judgments result from the interaction of two kinds of affective responses: first, a of inclination toward or aversion from certain acts, and then a further affective response (the ) to that basic affect (that is, sometimes we can be either inclined towards or averted (...)
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  24.  31
    Legal Indeterminacy.Brian Leiter - 1995 - Legal Theory 1 (4):481-492.
    To say that the law is indeterminate is to say that the class of legal reasons is indeterminate. The Class, in turn, consists of four components: 1. Legitimate sources of law ; 2. Legitimate interpretive operations that can be performed on the sources in order to generate rules of law ; 3. Legitimate interpretive operations that can be performed on the facts of record in order to generate facts of legal significance ; and 4. Legitimate rational operations that can be (...)
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  25.  40
    Nietzsche's Moral and Political Philosophy.Brian Leiter - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  26.  65
    Nietzsche and the Morality Critics.Brian Leiter - 1997 - Ethics 107 (2):250-285.
  27.  58
    Nietzsche's Theory of the Will.Brian Leiter - 2009 - In Ken Gemes & Simon May (eds.), Philosophical Topics. Oxford University Press. pp. 119-137.
    The essay offers a philosophical reconstruction of Nietzsche's theory of the will, focusing on (1) Nietzsche's account of the phenomenology of "willing " an action, the experience we have which leads us (causally) to conceive of ourselves as exercising our will; (2) Nietzsche's arguments that the experiences picked out by the phenomenology are not causally connected to the resulting action (at least not in a way sufficient to underwrite ascriptions of moral responsibility); and (3) Nietzsche's account of the actual causal (...)
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  28. The Hermeneutics of Suspicion: Recovering Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud.Brian Leiter - 2006 - In The Future for Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
     
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  29. Morality in the Pejorative Sense: On the Logic of Nietzsche's Critique of Morality.Brian Leiter - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (1):113 – 145.
    (1995). Morality in the pejorative sense: On the logic of Nietzsche's critique of morality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 113-145.
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  30. The Paradox of Fatalism and Self-Creation in Nietzsche.Brian Leiter - 2001 - In John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.), Nietzsche. Oxford University Press.
     
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  31.  18
    Reply to Five Critics of Why Tolerate Religion?Brian Leiter - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (3):547-558.
    This is my contribution to a symposium on my book Why Tolerate Religion?, in which I respond to essays by François Boucher and Cécile Laborde, Frederick Schauer, Corey Brettschneider, and Peter Jones. I clarify and revise my view of the sense in which some religious beliefs are “insulated from reasons and evidence” in response to the criticisms of Boucher and Laborde, but take issue with other aspects of their critique. I defend most of my original argument against utilitarian and egalitarian (...)
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  32. Review. Nietzsche: The Ethics of an Immoralist. Peter Berkowitz.B. Leiter - 1996 - Mind 105 (419):487-491.
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  33.  79
    Nietzsche and Aestheticism.Brian Leiter - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (2):275-290.
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  34. American Legal Realism.Brian Leiter - 2005 - In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
     
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  35.  66
    Mind Doesn't Matter Yet.Brian Leiter & Alexander Miller - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (2):220-28.
  36.  35
    In Praise of Realism (and Against 'Nonsense' Jurisprudence).Brian Leiter - manuscript
    Ronald Dworkin describes an approach to how courts should decide cases that he associates with Judge Richard Posner as a Chicago School of anti-theoretical, no-nonsense jurisprudence. Since Professor Dworkin takes his own view of adjudication to be diametrically opposed to that of the Chicago School, it might seem fair, then, to describe Dworkin's own theory as an instance of pro-theoretical, nonsense jurisprudence. That characterization is not one, needless to say, that Professor Dworkin welcomes. Dworkin describes his preferred approach to jurisprudential (...)
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  37. A Problem in Analysis: Franz Kafka's "a Country Doctor".Louis H. Leiter - 1958 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (3):337-347.
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  38.  50
    The Philosophical Gourmet.Brian Leiter - 1999 - The Philosophers' Magazine 8 (9):8-8.
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  39. Nietzsche's Philosophy of Action.Brian Leiter - unknown
    Nietzsche holds that people lack freedom of the will in any sense that would be sufficient for ascriptions of moral responsibility; that the conscious experience we have of willing is actually epiphenomenal with respect to the actions that follow that experience; and that our actions largely arise through non-conscious processes (psychological and physiological) of which we are only dimly aware, and over which we exercise little or no conscious control. At the same time, Nietzsche, always a master of rhetoric, engages (...)
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  40.  16
    Review of Christopher Janaway, Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's Genealogy[REVIEW]Brian Leiter - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
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  41. March 23-24, 2001.Brian Leiter - manuscript
    The conference will examine important historical influences on Nietzsche, as well as Nietzsche's legacy to later philosophy. Invited papers will last approximately one hour, followed by a short comment, and then general discussion.
     
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  42.  38
    Classical Realism.Brian Leiter - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):244 - 267.
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  43.  89
    Who is the 'Sovereign Individual'? Nietzsche on Freedom.Brian Leiter - unknown
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  44.  94
    Nietzsche’s Naturalism Reconsidered.Brian Leiter - 2013 - In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press.
    This article revisits the author’s influential account of Nietzche as a philosophical naturalist. It identifies the sources of Nietzsche’s position in the German naturalism of the mid-nineteenth century, in particular the work of Friedrich Lange. His naturalism is, however, “speculative” in that he postulates causal mechanisms not confirmed by science. Nietzsche’s ambition to explain morality naturalistically coexists with a “therapeutic” ambition to induce some readers to escape from morality. The article also addresses doubts that might arise against reading Nietzsche as (...)
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  45.  94
    Review: Nietzsche's Postmoralism: Essays on Nietzsche's Prelude to Philosophy's Future. [REVIEW]Brian Leiter - 2003 - Mind 112 (445):175-178.
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  46.  90
    The Epistemic Status of the Human Sciences: Critical Reflections on Foucault.Brian Leiter - unknown
    Any reader of Foucault's corpus recognizes fairly quickly that it is animated by an ethical impulse, namely, to liberate individuals from a kind of oppression from which they suffer. This oppression, however, does not involve the familiar tyranny of the Leviathan or the totalitarian state; it exploits instead values that the victim of oppression herself accepts, and which then leads the oppressed agent to be complicit in her subjugation. It also depends, crucially, on a skeptical thesis about the epistemology of (...)
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  47.  91
    Janaway on Nietzsche, Genealogy, and Naturalism: A Critical Review.Brian Leiter - manuscript
    This is a review essay (forthcoming in Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews) discussing Christopher Janaway's book "Beyond Seflessness: Reading Nietzsche's 'Genealogy' (OUP, 2007). Particular attention is given to the question of Nietzsche's style, and the relationship between his philosophical positions and his therapeutic objectives; to Janaway's critique of my account of Nietzsche's naturalism; and to Nietzsche's conception of agency and the meaning of the image (from GM II:2) of "the sovereign individual.".
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  48.  3
    Is There an 'American' Jurisprudence?B. Leiter - 1997 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 17 (2):367-387.
  49.  1
    Nietzsche's Naturalism and Nineteenth-Century Biology. Leiter - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (1):71.
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  50.  35
    Friedrich Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols.Brian Leiter - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):549-555.
    This review essay of Nietzsche’s “Twilight of the Idols” (1888) is part of the journal TOPOI’s “Untimely Reviews” series of classic works of philosophy. Themes dealt with are Nietzsche’s attacks on morality, on free will, on mental causation, on Socrates, and on Kant. Connections are drawn with contemporary work by Mark Johnston, David Rosenthal, and Daniel Wegner, among others.
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