Results for 'Leucippus'

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  1.  15
    Leucippus's Atomism.Daniel W. Graham - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The founder of atomic theory, according to Aristotle and Theophrastus, is Leucippus. His very existence has been called into question. Three of the best minds of nineteenth-century scholarship were embroiled in a vehement debate on this question, which thereupon became a cause célèbre, with scholars weighing in on both sides for the next half century. Ultimately this debate seems to have ended in stalemate and exhaustion rather than in any clear-cut decision. After briefly reviewing the debate, this article argues (...)
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  2.  39
    Leucippus, Democritus and the Oυ Μαλλoν Principle: An Examination of Theophrastus Phys.Op. Fr. 8.Malcolm Schofield - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):253-263.
    This paper is a piece of detective work. Starting from an obvious excrescence in the transmitted text of Simplicius's treatment of the foundations of Presocratic atomism near the beginning of his "Physics" commentary, it excavates a Theophrastean correction to Aristotle's tendency to lump Leucippus and Democritus together: Theophrastus made application of the οὐ μ[unrepresentable symbol]λλον principle in the sphere of ontology an innovation by Democritus. Along the way it shows Simplicius reordering his Theophrastean source in his efforts to find (...)
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  3.  19
    Leucippus, Democritus and the Oυ Μαλλoν Principle: An Examination of Theophrastus Phys.Op. Fr. 8.Malcolm Schofield - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):253 - 263.
    This paper is a piece of detective work. Starting from an obvious excrescence in the transmitted text of Simplicius's treatment of the foundations of Presocratic atomism near the beginning of his "Physics" commentary, it excavates a Theophrastean correction to Aristotle's tendency to lump Leucippus and Democritus together: Theophrastus made application of the οὐ μ[unrepresentable symbol]λλον principle in the sphere of ontology an innovation by Democritus. Along the way it shows Simplicius reordering his Theophrastean source in his efforts to find (...)
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  4.  39
    The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus. Fragments: A Text and Translation with a Commentary. [REVIEW]James Warren & C. C. W. Taylor - 2000 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:175-175.
  5. The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus: Fragments.[author unknown] - 1999 - University of Toronto Press.
     
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  6.  51
    Leucippus and Democritus on Like to Like and Ou Mallon.Gregory Andrew - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (4):1-23.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  7. Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW]Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index - 2009 - In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill.
     
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  8.  37
    C. C. W. Taylor: The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus Fragments (the Phoenix Presocratics Series). Pp. XII + 308. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 1999. [REVIEW]Tiziano Dorandi - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):421-.
  9.  21
    Leucippus.Sylvia Berryman - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10.  7
    The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus. Fragments. [REVIEW]Mi-Kyoung Lee - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):456-461.
  11. CCW Taylor, The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus. Fragments Reviewed By.Dirk T. Held - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (3):219-221.
     
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  12.  4
    Zu Leucippus.E. Zeller - 1902 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 15 (2):137-140.
  13. Leucippus.Author unknown - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  14. C.C.W. Taylor, The Atomists: Leucippus And Democritus. Fragments. [REVIEW]Dirk Held - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21:219-221.
     
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  15. The Atomists: Leucippus and Democritus. Fragments, A Text and Translation with a Commentary by C.C.W. Taylor.M. Lee - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):456.
  16. Epicurus and Leucippus.Dewitt Dewitt - 1944 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 38:155-157.
  17. Democritus.Author unknown - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  18. I Primi Atomisti: Raccolta di Testi Che Riguardano Leucippo E Democrito.Walter Leszl, Leucippus & Democritus (eds.) - 2009 - Leo S. Olschki.
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  19. Spontaneity, Democritean Causality and Freedom.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2009 - Elenchos 30 (1):5-52.
    Critics have alleged that Democritus’ ethical prescriptions (“gnomai”) are incompatible with his physics, since his atomism seems committed to necessity or chance (or an awkward combination of both) as a universal cause of everything, leaving no room for personal responsibility. I argue that Democritus’ critics, both ancient and contemporary, have misunderstood a fundamental concept of his causality: a cause called “spontaneity”, which Democritus evidently considered a necessary (not chance) cause, compatible with human freedom, of both atomic motion and human actions. (...)
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  20.  42
    Reduction, Multiple Realizability, and Levels of Reality.Sven Walter & Markus Eronen - 2011 - In Steven French & Juha Saatsi (eds.), Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Continuum. pp. 138.
    The idea of reduction has appeared in different forms throughout the history of science and philosophy. Thales took water to be the fundamental principle of all things; Leucippus and Democritus argued that everything is composed of small, indivisible atoms; Galileo and Newton tried to explain all motion with a few basic laws; 17th century mechanism conceived of everything in terms of the motions and collisions of particles of matter; British Empiricism held that all knowledge is, at root, experiential knowledge; (...)
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  21. Presocratics: Natural Philosophers Before Socrates.James Warren & Steven Gerrard - 2007 - University of California Press.
    The earliest phase of philosophy in Europe saw the beginnings of cosmology and rational theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethical and political theory. It also saw the development of a wide range of radical and challenging ideas, from Thales' claim that magnets have souls and Parmenides' account of one unchanging existence to the development of an atomist theory of the physical world. This general account of the Presocratics introduces the major Greek philosophical thinkers from the sixth to the middle of the (...)
     
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  22. Aristotle's 'Cosmic Nose' Argument for the Uniqueness of the World.Tim O'Keefe & Harald Thorsrud - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (4):311 - 326.
    David Furley's work on the cosmologies of classical antiquity is structured around what he calls "two pictures of the world." The first picture, defended by both Plato and Aristotle, portrays the universe, or all that there is (to pan), as identical with our particular ordered world-system. Thus, the adherents of this view claim that the universe is finite and unique. The second system, defended by Leucippus and Democritus, portrays an infinite universe within which our particular kosmos is only one (...)
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  23.  90
    The Concept of the Good (Tagathon) in Philosophy Before Plato.Artur Pacewicz - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 7.
    The aim of the article is to outline an interpretation of the philosophical understanding of the concept of the good in pre-Platonic thought. The interpretation is based on those fragments only in which the concept actually appears. As a result of the adopted assumption, the ideas of the first philosophers, i.e. Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes, were outside the scope of the investigation, as well as those of Xenophanes, Eleatics, Empedocles, Anaxagoras and Leucippus. In the case of the first philosophical (...)
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  24.  54
    An Aristotelian Watchdog As Avant-Garde Physicist: Julius Caesar Scaliger.Christoph Lüthy - 2001 - The Monist 84 (4):542-561.
    There are many good reasons for seeing Aristotelian hylemorphism and atomism as diametrically opposed theories of matter. Aristotle himself had forcefully combatted the physical model of Leucippus and Democritus, whose ontology consisted of indivisible material bodies moving in an immaterial void, presenting his own model as an alternative. This alternative excluded both indivisibles and the void and postulated instead a plenist world made up of substances all of which were infinitely divisible continua composed of universal matter and specific substantial (...)
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  25.  12
    Presocratic Theology.T. M. Robinson - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    If in the context of early and classical Greek thought, the term “theology” is taken to mean “of God/gods/the gods and his/their putative relationship, causal and directive, to the world and its operations, and to ourselves within that world,” or something of that order, the first ascription of such a notion to a Presocratic philosopher is to be found in Aristotle's comment that “Thales thought that all things are full of gods”. The Presocratic period ends with no neat causal sequence. (...)
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  26.  54
    The Concepts of Space and Time. Their Structure and Their Development. [REVIEW]B. W. A. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (4):728-729.
    This useful anthology comprises seventy-nine selections arranged under three headings. Part I is titled "Ancient and Classical Ideas of Space"; part II, "The Classical and Ancient Concepts of Time"; part III, "Modern Views of Space and Time and their Anticipations." According to the general editors of the Boston series, R. S. Cohen and Marx W. Wartofsky, Capek’s choice of contents was governed by the desire to show that "parts of our view of nature greatly and mutually influence other parts, and (...)
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  27.  24
    Friedrich Nietzsche and Weimar Classicism.Paul Bishop - 2005 - Camden House.
    Die Geburt der Tragödie and Weimar classicism -- The formative influence of Weimar classicism in the genesis of Zarathustra -- The aesthetic gospel of Nietzsche's Zarathustra -- From Leucippus to Cassirer : toward a genealogy of "sincere semblance".
  28.  84
    Method and Metaphysics: Essays in Ancient Philosophy I.Jonathan Barnes - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Ancient philosophers -- The history of philosophy -- Philosophy within quotation marks? -- Anglophone attitudes -- Brentano's Aristotle -- Heidegger in the cave -- 'There was an old person from Tyre' -- The Presocratics in context -- Argument in ancient philosophy -- Philosophy and dialectic -- Aristotle and the methods of ethics -- Metacommentary -- An introduction to Aspasius -- Parmenides and the Eleatic One -- Reason and necessity in Leucippus -- Plato's cyclical argument -- Death and the philosopher (...)
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  29.  6
    Aristotle on Earlier Natural Science.Edward Hussey - 2012 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oup Usa. pp. 17.
    In the field of natural science, Aristotle recognizes as his forerunners a select group of theorists such as Heraclitus of Ephesus, Empedocles of Acragas, Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, and Leucippus and Democritus of Abdera. In addition, he mentions in the same contexts some whose claims to be “natural philosophers” are doubtful, yet who deserve notice in the same context, including Parmenides of Elea, Melissus of Samos, the people called Pythagoreans, and Plato as the author of the Timaeus. Aristotle takes seriously (...)
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  30.  17
    Atomism's Eleatic Roots.David Sedley - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Presocratic atomism was one of the most influential of the early theories: both Plato and Aristotle thought of it as a major competing theory, and it was an important source for post-Aristotelian Hellenistic theories. It has been commonplace that the atomism developed first by Leucippus of Abdera and then by Democritus of Abdera was a reaction to the Eleatic arguments of Zeno and Melissus, but the details of that influence have sometimes seemed rather hazy. This article brings them into (...)
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  31. Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit: Arguments New and Old for the Principle of Sufficient Reason Alexander R. Pruss November 1, 2002 1. Introduction. [REVIEW]Alexander Pruss - manuscript
    “Ex nihilo nihil fit,” goes the classic adage: nothing comes from nothing. Parmenides used the Principle of Sufficient Reason to argue that there was no such thing as change: If there was change, why did it happen when it happened rather than earlier or later? “Nothing happens in vain, but everything for a reason and under necessitation,” claimed Leucippus. Saint Thomas insisted in the.
     
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  32.  1
    On Democritean Rhysmos.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:1-37.
    In _Metaphysics_ A.4, Aristotle provides crucial information about fundamental aspects of the chemistry and microphysics of the atomic theory of Leucippus and Democritus of Abdera. Besides the plenum and the void, which he identifies as the elements of the atomic theory, he presents what he himself names as _differences_. These fundamental differences are named so because they ought to be responsible for the emergence of all other differences in the physical world, and especially the ones that hit our senses. (...)
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  33.  24
    If the Eye Were an Animal... The Problem of Representation in Understanding, Meaning and Intelligence.John M. Horner - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (2):127-138.
    Theories of epistemology have come a long way since Leucippus’ account of objects emitting copies of themselves that are taken up by the senses and presented to the soul, but much of modern psychology and epistemology are still based upon a representational theory of knowledge -- that there is something in our head which ‘stands for’ the things in our world. This view has been challenged since Aristotle by an alternative view that knowledge is simply a change in the (...)
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  34.  16
    Looking for the Styleme.Berel Lang - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (2):405-413.
    Nature did not equip any of its creatures with wheels, but that means of locomotion was discovered anyway; an even swifter vehicle for the mind has been found in the atom—that irreducible unit which by virtue of its ubiquity provides reason with immediate access to alien objects, naturalizes nature, and urges an essential likeness beneath appearances so diverse that only an improbable imagination would even have placed them in a single world. The goal of atomism is to find one entity, (...)
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  35.  3
    Critical Study Experimental Realism: A Critique of Bas Van Fraassen's "Constructive Empiricism".Richard H. Schlagel - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (4):789-814.
    THE CONVICTION that nature as ordinarily experienced is the manifestation of a deeper, more extensive physical reality is now commonplace. While Aristotle could believe that the visible qualities and substantial forms of the perceptual world correspond to the real natures of things, the advent of modern classical mechanics, incorporating the atomic theory, dispelled this notion. As in the ancient atomic theories of Leucippus and Democritus, the composition, motion, and qualitative changes of phenomena were attributed to the interaction of "insensible (...)
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  36.  26
    Leucipo, Demócrito E Kant: Uma Reflexão Sobre a Equivalência Entre Ser E Não-Ser.Eberth Eleuterio dos Santos - 2015 - Trans/Form/Ação 38 (2):71-94.
    De início, apresentaremos a tese de Demócrito e Leucipo, segundo a qual o ser não é mais que o não-ser, tendo como contraponto o pensamento eleata acerca da inexistência necessária do não-ser. Esta discussão nos remete à oposição entre o pleno e o vazio que será posteriormente traduzida na oposição entre o ser e o nada. Desse modo, a oposição entre o pleno e o vazio é uma oposição que se desloca para o ser e o não-ser. Em seguida, faremos (...)
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  37.  40
    À quelles conditions peut-on parler de « matière » dans le Timée de Platon ?Luc Brisson - 2003 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 1 (1):5-21.
    Dans le Timée, l'hypothèse de la khó̱ra, qu'il faut se garder d'identifier avec la húle̱ aristotélicienne, permet de rendre compte du fait que les choses sensibles sont radicalement différentes de leur modèle intelligible. Or, la constitution mathématique des éléments à partir de la khó̱ra mène à la contradiction suivante : dans l'univers platonicien, il faut tenir compte à la fois du continu qui doit caractériser la khó̱ra, et du discontinu qu'instaurent inéluctablement les polyèdres réguliers auxquels sont associés les éléments. La (...)
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  38. Democritus (460-370 Bce.).Justin Leiber - unknown
    Democritus was born at Abdera, about 460 BCE, although according to some 490. His father was from a noble family and of great wealth, and contributed largely towards the entertainment of the army of Xerxes on his return to Asia. As a reward for this service the Persian monarch gave and other Abderites presents and left among them several Magi. Democritus, according to Diogenes Laertius, was instructed by these Magi in astronomy and theology. After the death of his father he (...)
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  39.  8
    A Note on the Deity of Alcman's Partheneion.A. F. Garvie - 1965 - Classical Quarterly 15 (02):185-.
    The recurrence of horse-imagery in Alcman's Partheneion suggested to Bowra that the chorus may have been the guild of priestesses called Leucippides, who seem from a mysterious gloss in Hesychius to have been known as It is true that the comparison of girls with fillies is common enough in Greek, but the appearance of Helen as of girls like at Ar. Lys. 1308–15 seems, as Bowra says, ‘to hide a ritual use of ’. The existence of this guild of priestesses (...)
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  40.  21
    A Lesniewskian Reading of Ancient Ontology: Parmenides to Democritus.Paul Thom - 1986 - History and Philosophy of Logic 7 (2):155-166.
    Parmenides formulated a formal ontology, to which various additions and alternatives were proposed by Melissus, Gorgias, Leucippus and Democritus. These systems are here interpreted as modifications of a minimal Le?niewskian ontology.
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  41.  5
    Atheism and the Physical Sciences.Victor J. Stenger - 2013 - In Stephen Bullivant & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism. Oxford University Press. pp. 432.
    While belief in gods was almost universal in the ancient world, Thales of Miletus introduced the notion that observed phenomena could be explained in natural terms without invoking imagined spirits. Leucippus and Democritus, and later Epicurus and Lucretius, proposed that everything was composed of particulate atoms in an otherwise empty void. Any gods that existed played no role in the human world. The universe was infinite, eternal, uncreated, and included many worlds besides our own. These ideas conflicted with the (...)
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  42. Mass: The Quest to Understand Matter From Greek Atoms to Quantum Fields.Jim Baggott - 2017 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Everything around us is made of 'stuff', from planets, to books, to our own bodies. Whatever it is, we call it matter or material substance. It is solid; it has mass. But what is matter, exactly? We are taught in school that matter is not continuous, but discrete. As a few of the philosophers of ancient Greece once speculated, nearly two and a half thousand years ago, matter comes in 'lumps', and science has relentlessly peeled away successive layers of matter (...)
     
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  43. A Physicalist Critique of the Development of Atomism in Early Greek Philosophy.Daniel C. Davis - 1982 - Dissertation, The American University
    In this dissertation I uncover a logic of the development of atomism in early Greek philosophy that has not been previously recognized in the philosophical literature. This logic results from the nature of subjectivity and the attempt by reflective subjects to understand the world in which they live. Thus because of the nature of illusions built in to perception and reflection, reflective subjects who attempt to understand their world will develop more or less accurate accounts according to their ability to (...)
     
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  44. A Note on the Deity of Alcman's Partheneion.A. Garvie - 1965 - Classical Quarterly 15 (2):185-187.
    The recurrence of horse-imagery in Alcman's Partheneion suggested to Bowra that the chorus may have been the guild of priestesses called Leucippides, who seem from a mysterious gloss in Hesychius to have been known as It is true that the comparison of girls with fillies is common enough in Greek, but the appearance of Helen as of girls like at Ar. Lys. 1308–15 seems, as Bowra says, ‘to hide a ritual use of ’. The existence of this guild of priestesses (...)
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  45. The Concept Of The Good In The Pre-Platonic Philosophy: W Filozofii Przedplatońskiej).Artur Pacewicz - 2006 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 1 (1):87-99.
    The aim of the article is to outline an interpretation of the philosophical understanding of the concept of the good in pre-Platonic thought. The interpretation is based on those fragments only in which the concept actually appears. As a result of the adopted assumption, the ideas of the first philosophers, i.e. Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes, were outside the scope of the investigation, as well as those of Xenophanes, Eleatics, Empedocles, Anaxagoras and Leucippus. In the case of the first philosophical (...)
     
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  46. Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter.Donald Palmer - 2009 - Mcgraw-Hill.
    Introduction -- The pre-socratic philosophers -- Sixth and fifth centuries B.C.E. -- Thales -- Anaximander -- Anaximenes -- Pythagoras -- Heraclitus -- Parmenides -- Zeno -- Empedocles -- Anaxagoras -- Leucippus and Democritus -- The Athenian period -- Fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. -- The Sophists -- Protagoras -- Gorgias -- Thrasymachus -- Callicles and Critias -- Socrates -- Plato -- Aristotle -- The Hellenistic and Roman periods -- Fourth century B.C.E. through fourth century C.E. -- Epicureanism -- Stoicism (...)
     
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