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Ller [5] Ller [2]Friedemann Ller [1]
  1.  43
    Words in the Brain's Language. PulvermÜ & Friedemann Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):253-279.
  2.  3
    Probability Theory and Causation: A Branching Space-Times Analysis.Thomas M.Ü & Ller - 2005 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (3):487-520.
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  3. A ambigüidade da consciência moral moderna e da dialéctica da sua resoluç'o na eticidade.Marcos Lutz M.Ü & Ller - 1994 - Escritos de Filosofía 13 (25):209-238.
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  4.  20
    Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Language.Friedemann PulvermÜ & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):307-327.
    In this response to multidisciplinary commentaries on the target article, “Words in the brain's language,” additional features of the cell-assembly model are reviewed, as demanded by some of the commentators. Subsequently, methodological considerations on how to perform additional tests of neurobiological language models as well as a discussion of recent data from neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and other behavioral studies in speakers of spoken and sign languages follow. Special emphasis is put on the explanatory power of the cell-assembly model regarding neuropsychological double (...)
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  5.  14
    Please Mind the Brain, and Brain the Mind!Uni-Konstanzde Wwwclinical-Psychologyuni-Konstanzde PulvermÜ & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1035-1036.
    True, there may be two language-processing systems, lexicon and syntax. However, could we not say more than that they are computationally and linguistically distinct? Where are they in the brain, why are they where they are, and how can their distinctness and functional properties be explained by biological principles? A brain model of language is necessary to answer these questions. One view is that two different types of corticocortical connections are most important for storing rules and their exceptions: short-range connections (...)
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  6.  10
    Words in the Brain's Language.Friedemann PulvermÜ & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):253-279.
    If the cortex is an associative memory, strongly connected cell assemblies will form when neurons in different cortical areas are frequently active at the same time. The cortical distributions of these assemblies must be a consequence of where in the cortex correlated neuronal activity occurred during learning. An assembly can be considered a functional unit exhibiting activity states such as full activation (“ignition”) after appropriate sensory stimulation (possibly related to perception) and continuous reverberation of excitation within the assembly (a putative (...)
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  7.  9
    Lexical Access as a Brain Mechanism.Friedemann PulvermÜ & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):52-54.
    The following questions are addressed concerning how a theory of lexical access can be realized in the brain: (1) Can a brainlike device function without inhibitory mechanisms? (2) Where in the brain can one expect to find processes underlying access to word semantics, syntactic word properties, phonological word forms, and their phonetic gestures? (3) If large neuron ensembles are the basis of such processes, how can one expect these populations to be connected? (4) In particular, how could one-way, reciprocal, and (...)
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  8.  6
    The Lexicon From a Neurophysiological View.Horst M. M.Ü & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):50-51.
    (1) Reaction time (RT) studies give only a partial picture of language processing, hence it may be risky to use the output of the computational model to inspire neurophysiological investigations instead of seeking further neurophysiological data to adjust the RT based theory. (2) There is neurophysiological evidence for differences in the cortical representation of different word categories; this could be integrated into a future version of the Levelt model. (3) EEG/MEG coherence analysis allows the monitoring of synchronous electrical activity in (...)
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