Results for 'Much'

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  1. On Proving Too Much.Moti Mizrahi - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (3):353-358.
    It is quite common to object to an argument by saying that it “proves too much.” In this paper, I argue that the “proving too much” charge can be understood in at least three different ways. I explain these three interpretations of the “proving too much” charge. I urge anyone who is inclined to level the “proving too much” charge against an argument to think about which interpretation of that charge one has in mind.
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  2.  2
    Is the Conceptual Eurocentrism So Much Frightening?Nataliya A. Kanaeva - 2019 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 62 (6):70-87.
    The article is a response to the criticism of “conceptual Eurocentrism” expressed in the paper by A.A. Krushinsky at the Round Table on the Geography of Rationality on April 25, 2019. It deals with the main thesis of A.A. Krushinsky that in cross-cultural philosophical studies the Western conceptual matrix currently defines a single conceptual space for all participants, the language of Western philosophy acts as a trans-civilizational language in the world philosophy. The author of the article agrees with the main (...)
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  3. Too Much of a Good Thing? Enhancement and the Burden of Self-Determination.Saskia K. Nagel - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (2):109-119.
    There is a remedy available for many of our ailments: Psychopharmacology promises to alleviate unsatisfying memory, bad moods, and low self-esteem. Bioethicists have long discussed the ethical implications of enhancement interventions. However, they have not considered relevant evidence from psychology and economics. The growth in autonomy in many areas of life is publicized as progress for the individual. However, the broadening of areas at one’s disposal together with the increasing individualization of value systems leads to situations in which the range (...)
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  4. Do CEOs Get Paid Too Much?Jeffrey Moriarty - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):257-281.
    In 2003, CEOs of the 365 largest U.S. corporations were paid on average $8 million, 301 times as much as factory workers. This paper asks whether CEOs get paid too much. Appealing to widely recognized moral values, I distinguish three views of justice in wages: the agreement view, the desert view, and the utility view. I argue that, no matter which view is correct, CEOs get paid too much. I conclude by offering two ways CEO pay might (...)
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  5.  68
    How Much Writing is Enough? - Delivered at Derrida Today Conference, 2014 Fordham University, New York.James Brusseau - manuscript
    The difference between Derrida and Deleuze has been debated in terms of their understandings and uses of the historical distinction between Being and beings. Daniel W. Smith intersects with the question when discussing transcendence and immanence. Clair Colebrook intersects when discussing materialism. Paul Patton intersects when distinguishing the unconditioned and conditioned. This essay moves along with their ideas, and contributes to the discussion by re-inscribing the debate in terms of nouns and verbs. The conclusion suggests that the noun/verb prism yields (...)
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  6.  12
    Too Much Medicine: Not Enough Trust?Zoë Fritz & Richard Holton - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):31-35.
    As many studies around the theme of ‘too much medicine’ attest, investigations are being ordered with increasing frequency; similarly the threshold for providing treatment has lowered. Our contention is that trust is a significant factor in influencing this, and that understanding the relationship between trust and investigations and treatments will help clinicians and policymakers ensure ethical decisions are more consistently made. Drawing on the philosophical literature, we investigate the nature of trust in the patient–doctor relationship, arguing that at its (...)
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  7.  2
    Too Much Medicine: Not Enough Trust? A Response.Joshua Parker - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):746-747.
    In their paper ’Too much medicine: not enough trust?' Zoë Fritz and Richard Holton explore the connection between trust and overtreatment and overinvestigation. Whilst their paper is insightful, here I argue that much more could be made of a doctor’s trust and how this exacerbates overtreatment and overinvestigation. By taking Fritz and Holton’s view of trust as having ‘our best interests at heart’ as my starting point, I argue that doctor’s do not always trust that patients or the (...)
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  8. When, What, and How Much to Reward in Reinforcement Learning-Based Models of Cognition.Christian P. Janssen & Wayne D. Gray - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):333-358.
    Reinforcement learning approaches to cognitive modeling represent task acquisition as learning to choose the sequence of steps that accomplishes the task while maximizing a reward. However, an apparently unrecognized problem for modelers is choosing when, what, and how much to reward; that is, when (the moment: end of trial, subtask, or some other interval of task performance), what (the objective function: e.g., performance time or performance accuracy), and how much (the magnitude: with binary, categorical, or continuous values). In (...)
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  9.  19
    Famine, Affluence and Intuitions: Evolutionary Debunking Proves Too Much.Geoffrey S. Holtzman - 2018 - Disputatio 10 (48):57-70.
    Moral theorists like Singer and Greene argue that we should discount intuitions about ‘up-close-and-personal’ moral dilemmas because they are more likely than intuitions about ‘impersonal’ dilemmas to be artifacts of evolution. But by that reasoning, it seems we should ignore the evolved, ‘up-close-and-personal’ intuition to save a drowning child in light of the too-new-to-be-evolved, ‘impersonal’ intuition that we need not donate to international famine relief. This conclusion seems mistaken and horrifying, yet it cannot be the case both that ‘up-close-and-personal’ intuitions (...)
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  10.  99
    How Much Compensation Can CEOs Permissibly Accept?Jeffrey Moriarty - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):235-250.
    Debates about the ethics of executive compensation are dominated by familiar themes. Many writers consider whether the amount of pay CEOs receive is too large—relative to firm performance, foreign CEO pay, or employee pay. Many others consider whether the process by which CEOs are paid is compromised by weak or self-serving boards of directors. This paper examines the issue from a new perspective. I focus on the duties executives themselves have with respect to their own compensation. I argue that CEOs’ (...)
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  11.  30
    Much More Than a Gene: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, Reproductive Choices and Family Life. [REVIEW]Catherine Dekeuwer & Simone Bateman - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):231-244.
    This article presents the results of a study that investigates the way in which carriers of a mutation on the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, associated with a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, make their reproductive decisions. Using semi-structured interviews, the study explored the way in which these persons reflected on the acceptability of taking the risk of transmitting this mutation to the next generation, the arguments they used in favor or against taking that risk, and in the (...)
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  12. How Much Should We Value Autonomy?Marina Oshana - 2003 - Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):99-126.
    Autonomy generally is a valued condition for persons in liberal cultures such as the United States. We uphold autonomous agents as the exemplar of persons who, by their judgment and action, authenticate the social and political principles and policies that advance their interests. But questions about the value of autonomy are often problematic. They are problematic because they concern the kind of value autonomy has and not just how much value autonomy has when weighed against competing goods. The two (...)
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  13. How Much for the Child?Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):189-204.
    In this paper we explore what sacrifices you are morally required to make to save a child who is about to die in front of you. It has been argued that you would have very demanding duties to save such a child (or any adult who is in similar circumstance through no fault of their own, for that matter), and some examples have been presented to make this claim seem intuitively correct. Against this, we argue that you do not in (...)
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  14. Concept Calculus: Much Better Than.Harvey M. Friedman - unknown
    This is the initial publication on Concept Calculus, which establishes mutual interpretability between formal systems based on informal commonsense concepts and formal systems for mathematics through abstract set theory. Here we work with axioms for "better than" and "much better than", and the Zermelo and Zermelo Frankel axioms for set theory.
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  15. Promising Too Much.Julia Driver - 2011 - In Hanoch Sheinman (ed.), Promises and Agreements: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    This paper begins with the idea that we can learn a good deal about promising by examining the conditions and norms that govern promise- breaking. Sometimes promises are broken as a deliberate plan, other times they are broken because they are simply incompatible with other, more signifi cant moral norms, or because it becomes clear that they are impossible to keep. There are cases where people make promises that are actually incompatible with each other. Politicians, for example, often give such (...)
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  16. Contradictory Information: Too Much of a Good Thing. [REVIEW]J. Michael Dunn - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (4):425 - 452.
    Both I and Belnap, motivated the "Belnap-Dunn 4-valued Logic" by talk of the reasoner being simply "told true" (T) and simply "told false" (F), which leaves the options of being neither "told true" nor "told false" (N), and being both "told true" and "told false" (B). Belnap motivated these notions by consideration of unstructured databases that allow for negative information as well as positive information (even when they conflict). We now experience this on a daily basis with the Web. But (...)
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  17. Coercive Theories of Meaning or Why Language Shouldn't Matter (So Much) to Philosophy.Charles R. Pigden - 2010 - Logique Et Analyse 53 (210):151.
    This paper is a critique of coercive theories of meaning, that is, theories (or criteria) of meaning designed to do down ones opponents by representing their views as meaningless or unintelligible. Many philosophers from Hobbes through Berkeley and Hume to the pragmatists, the logical positivists and (above all) Wittgenstein have devised such theories and criteria in order to discredit their opponents. I argue 1) that such theories and criteria are morally obnoxious, a) because they smack of the totalitarian linguistic tactics (...)
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  18.  18
    Empirical Technoscience Studies in a Comtean World: Too Much Concreteness? [REVIEW]Robert C. Scharff - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):153-177.
    Abstract No one doubts the radically transformative power of contemporary technologies and technoscientific practices over the material dimensions of our experience. Yet with the coming of all the exciting changes and the promise of ever better material conditions, what kinds of lives are we implicitly being encouraged to live? One would think that current philosophical studies of technology would make this a central question, and indeed, a few have done so. But many do not. Following the lead of thinkers who (...)
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  19. Consciousness Might Matter Very Much.Adam Shriver & Colin Allen - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):113-22.
    Peter Carruthers argues that phenomenal consciousness might not matter very much either for the purpose of determining which nonhuman animals are appropriate objects of moral sympathy, or for the purpose of explaining for the similarities in behavior of humans and nonhumans. Carruthers bases these claims on his version of a dispositionalist higher-order thought (DHOT) theory of consciousness which allows that much of human behavior is the result of first-order beliefs that need not be conscious, and that prima facie (...)
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  20.  14
    Research Report Appraisal: How Much Understanding is Enough?Martin Lipscomb - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (3):157-170.
    When appraising research papers, how much understanding is enough? More specifically, in deciding whether research results can inform practice, do appraisers need to substantively understand how findings are derived or is it sufficient simply to grasp that suitable analytic techniques were chosen and used by researchers? The degree or depth of understanding that research appraisers need to attain before findings can legitimately/sensibly inform practice is underexplored. In this paper it is argued that, where knowledge/justified beliefs derived from research evidence (...)
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  21.  21
    Why Swedish Men Take So Much Paternity Leave.S. H. - 2014 - The Economist 171:1.
    Sweden features near the top of most gender-equality rankings. The World Economic Forum rates it as having one of the narrowest gender gaps in the world. But Sweden is not only a good place to be a woman: it also appears to be an idyll for new dads. Close to 90% of Swedish fathers take paternity leave. In 2013, some 340,000 dads took a total of 12 million days’ leave, equivalent to about seven weeks each. Women take even more leave (...)
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  22.  59
    Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics.Andrew Fenton - 2012 - The Monist 95 (3):463-485.
    A recent argument in the neuroethics literature has suggested that brain-mental-state identities promise to settle epistemological uncertainties about nonhuman animal minds. What’s more, these brain-mental-state identities offer the further promise of dismantling the deadlock over the moral status of nonhuman animals, to positive affect in such areas as agriculture and laboratory animal science. I will argue that neuroscientific claims assuming brain-mental-state identities do not so much resolve the problem of other animal minds as mark its resolution. In the meantime, (...)
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  23.  25
    Multiversism and Concepts of Set: How Much Relativism is Acceptable?Neil Barton - 2016 - In Francesca Boccuni & Andrea Sereni (eds.), Objectivity, Realism, and Proof. FilMat Studies in the Philosophy of Mathematics. Springer. pp. 189-209.
    Multiverse Views in set theory advocate the claim that there are many universes of sets, no-one of which is canonical, and have risen to prominence over the last few years. One motivating factor is that such positions are often argued to account very elegantly for technical practice. While there is much discussion of the technical aspects of these views, in this paper I analyse a radical form of Multiversism on largely philosophical grounds. Of particular importance will be an account (...)
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  24.  34
    Much Sense the Starkest Madness: Sade's Moral Scepticism.Geoffrey Roche - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (1):45-59.
    Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, in Dialectic of Enlightenment [Dialektik der Aufklärung, first published in 1944], argue that Donatien-Alphonse-François, the Marquis de Sade (1740–1814), and Friedrich Nietzsche have brought the Enlightenment project of grounding morality in reason to an end. For Adorno and Horkheimer, Sade has revealed philosophy’s moral impotency, in particular “the impossibility of deriving from reason any fundamental argument against murder [...].”1 Marcel Hénaff, Susan Neiman, and Annie Le Brun have similarly suggested that Sade has demonstrated that morality (...)
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  25.  25
    “What They Think of the Causes of So Much Suffering”: S. Weir Mitchell, John Kearsley Mitchell, and Ideas About Phantom Limb Pain in Late 19th C. America.Daniel Goldberg - 2016 - Spontaneous Generations 8 (1):27-54.
    This paper analyzes S. Weir Mitchell and his son John Kearsley Mitchell’s views on phantom limb pain in late 19th c. America. Drawing on a variety of primary sources including journal articles, letters, and treatises, the paper pioneers analysis of a cache of surveys sent out by the Mitchells that contain amputee Civil War veterans’ own narratives of phantom limb pain. The paper utilizes an approach drawn from the history of ideas, documenting how changing models of medicine and objectivity help (...)
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  26.  22
    How Much is Due to Health Care Providers?Albert Weale - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:97-109.
    How much by way of economic reward is due to health care providers? Although this problem usually presents itself as a practical matter of policy, it has buried within it a number of philosophical issues, for it can be regarded as a question in the theory of economic justice. The formal principle of justice is that we should render persons what is due to them. But on what consideration in the case of health care providers can we make an (...)
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  27.  58
    Doing Too Much.Barbara Herman - 2018 - The Journal of Ethics 22 (2):147-162.
    It is common to find moral fault for doing less than one should, but not for doing more. A detailed investigation of some examples of “doing too much” reveals an important sphere of wrong-doing related to abuses of authority and discretion.
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  28.  30
    ABET Criterion 3.F: How Much Curriculum Content is Enough?B. E. Barry & M. W. Ohland - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):369-392.
    Even after multiple cycles of ABET accreditation, many engineering programs are unsure of how much curriculum content is needed to meet the requirements of ABET’s Criterion 3.f (an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility). This study represents the first scholarly attempt to assess the impact of curriculum reform following the introduction of ABET Criterion 3.f. This study sought to determine how much professional and ethical responsibility curriculum content was used between 1995 and 2005, as well as how, when, (...)
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  29.  9
    Too Much Medicine and the Poor Climate of Trust.Zoe Fritz & Richard J. Holton - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):748-749.
    Joshua Parker has made many interesting points1, and we welcome the opportunity to develop the ideas of ‘Too Much Medicine, Not Enough Trust’.2 We will address: the asymmetry between the trust that patients extend to doctors, and the trust that doctors extend to patients; our reasons for doubting that litigation or complaints reflect a betrayal of the patient–doctor relationship and the importance of institutional trust, both for the doctor and the patient. First, though, a clarification. We do not say (...)
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  30. Making Too Much of Possible Worlds.John Woods - unknown
    A possible worlds treatment of the normal alethic modalities was, after classical model theory, logic’s most significant semantic achievement in the century just past.[1] Kripke’s groundbreaking paper appeared in 1959 and, in the scant few succeeding years, its principal analytical tool, possible worlds, was adapted to serve a range of quite different-seeming purposes – from nonnormal logics,[2] to epistemic and doxastic logics[3], deontic[4] and temporal logics[5] and, not much later, the logic of counterfactual conditionals.[6] In short order, possible worlds (...)
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  31.  59
    “When Having Too Much Power is Harmful? - Spinoza on Political Luck”.Yitzhak Melamed - 2018 - In Yitzhak Melamed & Hasana Sharp (eds.), Spinoza's Political Treatise: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 161-174.
    Spinoza’s celebrated doctrine of the conatus asserts that “each thing, as far as it can by its own power, strives to persevere in its being” (E3p6). Shortly thereafter Spinoza makes the further claim that the (human) mind strives to increase its power of acting (E3p12). This latter claim is commonly interpreted as asserting that human beings (and their associations) not only strive to persevere in their existence, but also always strive to increase their power. Spinoza’s justification for E3p12 relies (among (...)
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  32.  19
    Fair Trade in Italy: Too Much 'Movement' in the Shop? [REVIEW]Leonardo Becchetti & Marco Costantino - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):181 - 203.
    We analyse the development of Fair Trade in Italy by examining its principles, structure, performance, dilemmas and potential solutions and identifying its main distinctive features. These lead us to develop a specifically Italian model. Fair Trade in Italy is younger than its more established North European counterparts and more focussed on broad social justice issues in addition to its concern to include marginalized producers. This normative difference has given rise to a social-economy-dominated value chain (with a partial corporate involvement uniquely (...)
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  33.  32
    How Much Philosophy in the Philosophy of Science?Anke Büter, Ramiro Glauer & Holger Lyre - 2014 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (1):1-3.
    This supplement serves a double purpose. It presents, on the one hand, a selection of papers devoted to the title question “How much philosophy in the philosophy of science?”. On the other hand, it signalizes the newly established cooperation between the German Society for the Philosophy of Science and the Journal for General Philosophy of Science .The GWP was founded in Hannover in 2011 and had its inaugural conference in March 2013 [for a report on the “GWP.2013” by H. (...)
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  34.  9
    Fair Trade in Italy: Too Much ‘Movement’ in the Shop?Leonardo Becchetti & Marco Costantino - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (S2):181-203.
    We analyse the development of Fair Trade in Italy by examining its principles, structure, performance, dilemmas and potential solutions and identifying its main distinctive features. These lead us to develop a specifically Italian model. Fair Trade in Italy is younger than its more established North European counterparts and more focussed on broad social justice issues in addition to its concern to include marginalized producers. This normative difference has given rise to a social-economy-dominated value chain, although it has generated much (...)
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  35.  29
    The Difference Between Answering a 'Why' - Question and Answering a 'How Much' - Question.Marcel J. Boumans - unknown
    Generally, simulations are carried out to answer specific questions. The assessment of the reliability of an answer depends on the kind of question investigated. The answer to a 'why' question is an explanation. The premises of an explanation have to include invariant relationships, and thus the reliability of such answer depends on whether the domain of invariance of the relevant relationships covers the domain of the question. The answer to a 'how much' question is a measurement. A measurement is (...)
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  36. Theology, Evolution, and the Human Mind: How Much Can Biology Explain?John F. Haught - 2009 - Zygon 44 (4):921-931.
    Evolutionary biology contributes much to our present understanding of life, and it promises also to deepen our understanding of human intelligence, ethics, and even religion. For some scientific thinkers, however, Darwin's science seems so impressive that it now supplants theology altogether by providing the ultimate explanation of all manifestations of life, not only biologically but also metaphysically. By focusing on human intelligence as an emergent aspect of nature this essay examines the question of whether theology can still have an (...)
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  37.  89
    Why Is So Much Philosophy So Tedious?David Mcnaughton - 2009 - Florida Philosophical Review 9 (2):1-13.
    Why is so much philosophy so tedious? Not, or not simply, because it is technical and complex, but because—too often—it displays mere cleverness. Implausible theories are defended against objections by ever more sophisticated technical fiddling with the details. Originality and creativity are in short supply. I argue that this is bad for philosophy, bad for philosophers, and almost inevitable given various structural features of the profession which require early and prolific publication. As a profession we are autonomous—we could change (...)
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  38.  54
    Does Descartes’s Real Distinction Argument Prove Too Much?Justin Skirry - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):399-423.
    Arnauld raised the concern that Descartes’s real distinction argument proved too much, because it seemed to lead us back to the Platonic view according to which the mind uses the body as its vehicle. Descartes responds by pointing out that he argued against this account of mind-body union in the Sixth Meditation. Descartes believes he did not prove too much, because he offers an argument against this view whose premises and conclusion are consistent with the real distinction argument. (...)
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  39.  12
    How Much Randomness is Needed for Statistics?Bjørn Kjos-Hanssen, Antoine Taveneaux & Neil Thapen - 2012 - In S. Barry Cooper (ed.), Annals of Pure and Applied Logic. pp. 395--404.
    In algorithmic randomness, when one wants to define a randomness notion with respect to some non-computable measure λ, a choice needs to be made. One approach is to allow randomness tests to access the measure λ as an oracle . The other approach is the opposite one, where the randomness tests are completely effective and do not have access to the information contained in λ . While the Hippocratic approach is in general much more restrictive, there are cases where (...)
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  40.  24
    Too Much of a Good Thing is Wonderful? A Conceptual Analysis of Excessive Examinations and Diagnostic Futility in Diagnostic Radiology.Bjørn Hofmann - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):139-148.
    It has been argued extensively that diagnostic services are a general good, but that it is offered in excess. So what is the problem? Is not “too much of a good thing wonderful”, to paraphrase Mae West? This article explores such a possibility in the field of radiological services where it is argued that more than 40% of the examinations are excessive. The question of whether radiological examinations are excessive cries for a definition of diagnostic futility. However, no such (...)
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  41.  51
    The 'Great Struggle' Between Cantorians and Neo-Aristotelians: Much Ado About Nothing.Miloš Arsenijević & Miodrag Kapetanović - 2008 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 76 (1):79-90.
    Starting from the generalized concept of syntactically and semantically trivial differences between two formal theories introduced by Arsenijević, we show that two systems of the linear continuum, the Cantorian point-based system and the Aristotelian interval-based system that satisfies Cantor's coherence condition, are only trivially different. So, the 'great struggle' (to use Cantor's phrase) between the two contending parties turns out to be 'much ado about nothing'.
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  42.  89
    David E. Fisher: Much Ado About (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases. [REVIEW]Sandra D. Hojniak - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):167-169.
    David E. Fisher: Much Ado about (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10698-011-9114-0 Authors Sandra D. Hojniak, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, 3001 Leuven, Belgium Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238.
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  43.  7
    Is Frequent Service-Learning a Too-Much-of-a-Good-Thing Effect?Omid Sabbaghi, Gerald F. Cavanagh & J. Timothy Hipskind - 2019 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 38 (1):79-110.
    In this study, we investigate the impact of frequent service learning on the emotional, personal development, and leadership characteristics of business students at a Catholic university in the United States. We examine the aforementioned impact of frequent service learning through a novel panel data set provided by the University’s Institute for Leadership and Service, ranging from the years 2008 through 2015. Specifically, we conduct an empirical analysis across the emotional, personal development, and leadership dimensions, and examine the too-much-of-a-good-thing effect (...)
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  44.  17
    "They Were All Human Beings: So Much Is Plain": Reflections on Cultural Relativism in the Humanities.E. H. Gombrich - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (4):686-699.
    In the fourth section of Goethe’s Zahme Xenien we find the quatrain from which I have taken the theme of such an old and new controversy, which, as I hope, concerns both Germanic studies and the other humanities: “What was it that kept you from us so apart?” I always read Plutarch again and again. “And what was the lesson he did impart?” “They were all human beings—so much is plain.”1 In the very years when Goethe wrote these lines, (...)
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  45.  46
    Paul Redding, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying so Much About Meaning and Love Hegel's Metaphysics and Kant's Epistemic Modesty.James Kreines - unknown
    In this interest of time, I’ll just say something directly: this is an incredible book. Reading it, thinking it through, is extremely rewarding. I haven’t read a work of philosophy that had as much impact on me since being in school myself. The book presents you with new ideas and connections and it forces you to see philosophy and its history in new ways, even if you (like me) had been quite attached to your old ways. The book got (...)
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  46.  26
    Meinong’s Much Maligned Modal Moment.Andrew Kenneth Jorgensen - 2002 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 64 (1):95-118.
    Russell's objections to object-theory have been refuted by the proofs of the consistency of Meinong's system given by various writers. These proofs exploit technical distinctions that Meinong apparently uses very little if at all. Instead, Meinong introduces a theoretical postulate called the modal moment. I describe this postulate and its place in Meinong's system, and I argue that it has been much under-rated by Meinong's logician expositors.
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  47.  36
    Responsible Behavioral Science Generalizations and Applications Require Much More Than Non-WEIRD Samples.Vladimir J. Konečni - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):98-99.
    There are many methodological considerations that adversely affect external validity as much as, or even more than, unrepresentative sampling does. Among suspect applications, especially worrisome is the incorporation of WEIRD-based findings regarding moral reasoning and retribution into normative expectations, such as might be held by international criminal tribunals in war-torn areas.
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  48. Do Physicians Make Too Much Money?Howard J. Curzer - 1992 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1).
    The average net income of physicians in the USA is more than four times the average net income of people working in all domestic industries in the USA. When critics suggest that physicians make too much money, defenders typically appeal to the following four prominent principles of economic justice: Aristotle's Income Principle, the Free Market Principle, the Utilitarian Income Principle, and Rawls' Difference Principle. I shall show that no matter which of these four principles is assumed, the present high (...)
     
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  49.  17
    How Much Care is Enough? Carer’s Guilt and Bergsonian Time.Will Johncock - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):94-107.
    Despite devoting their time to another person’s needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the “enough” of anything, what is at stake is that thing’s quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer’s experience, two (...)
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  50.  17
    ‘Safer to Trust Much Than to Trust Little’: Moral Education at Thring's Uppingham.Malcolm Tozer - 1987 - Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):131-138.
    In 1987 Uppingham School celebrates the centenary of the death of its best known headmaster, Edward Thring. When Thring arrived at the Rutland market town in 1853 he inherited a small country grammar school of purely local renown, but by the time of his death in 1887 Uppingham was a thriving public school of national reputation. As the school flourished, so too did the headmaster's standing, and in the decade before his death he was a much consulted authority on (...)
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