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Astrida Neimanis [12]George J. Neimanis [1] Neimanis [1]
  1.  43
    Four Problems, Four Directions for Environmental Humanities: Toward Critical Posthumanities for the Anthropocene. Neimanis, Åsberg & Hedrén - 2015 - Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):67-97.
    A consensus is building that our planet has entered the so-called age of the Anthropocene—a post-Holocene epoch defined by the significant impact of humans on geological, biotic and climatic planetary processes. On the one hand, there is good reason to exercise caution in relation to this concept of the “Age of Man.” At a time when immoderate anthropogenic impact poses a serious threat to ecological integrity and balance, calling an epoch after ourselves does not necessarily demonstrate the humility we may (...)
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  2.  49
    Weathering: Climate Change and the “Thick Time” of Transcorporeality.Astrida Neimanis & Rachel Loewen Walker - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):558-575.
    In the dominant “climate change” imaginary, this phenomenon is distant and abstracted from our experiences of weather and the environment in the privileged West. Moreover, climate change discourse is saturated mostly in either neoliberal progress narratives of controlling the future or sustainability narratives of saving the past. Both largely obfuscate our implication therein. This paper proposes a different climate change imaginary. We draw on feminist new materialist theories—in particular those of Stacy Alaimo, Claire Colebrook, and Karen Barad—to describe our relationship (...)
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  3.  12
    Justice Through a Multispecies Lens.Danielle Celermajer, Sria Chatterjee, Alasdair Cochrane, Stefanie Fishel, Astrida Neimanis, Anne O’Brien, Susan Reid, Krithika Srinivasan, David Schlosberg & Anik Waldow - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):475-512.
  4.  34
    Becoming-Grizzly: Bodily Molecularity and the Animal That Becomes.Astrida Neimanis - 2007 - PhaenEx 2 (2):279-308.
    Werner Herzog’s documentary film Grizzly Man about the life and death of Timothy Treadwell invites us to consider the relation between Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of becoming-animal and phenomenological accounts of lived embodiment. In this paper I begin with a general account of becoming-animal and suggest that this concept is helpfully elucidated by considering the ways in which some aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s practice can be understood as a rhizomatic phenomenology of our lived experience that in part extends the (...)
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  5.  29
    Business Ethics in the Former Soviet Union: A Report. [REVIEW]George J. Neimanis - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (3):357-362.
    Transition from a planned command economy to a market economy means tearing down a socio-economic setting where everybody follows orders and nobody bears individual responsibility for anything. The absence of personal responsibility does not promote ethical behavior in any walk of life. Today, the malnourished business ethics in the former Soviet Union creates a critical obstacle to economic development. The paucity of new official rules governing the conduct of business makes the transition process painful and difficult to people habituated to (...)
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  6.  44
    Feminist Interpretations of Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]Astrida Neimanis - 2007 - Symposium 11 (2):489-492.
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  7.  24
    Commuting Bodies Move, Creatively.Astrida Neimanis - 2008 - PhaenEx 3 (2):115-148.
    In this paper, I sketch out the way our bodies are engaged while commuting in order to elucidate several key aspects of the bodily experience of “in-between-ness.” I discover that within the rhythm and movement of the in-between, our bodies can open to a specific kind of conceptual creativity—an insight that I unfold in reference to the unanticipated innovation and transformation that accompanies other bodily experiences of in-between-ness more generally. This sketch, however, also demands that I reflect on phenomenological methodology, (...)
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  8.  24
    Introduction: Back to the Things Themselves! (Again).Astrida Neimanis & D. R. Koukal - 2008 - PhaenEx 3 (2).
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  9.  17
    Editorial: The Inaugural Issue.John Duncan, Paul Gyllenhammer & Astrida Neimanis - 2006 - PhaenEx 1 (1).
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  10.  10
    Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson.Astrida Neimanis - 2016 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 6 (2):307-312.
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  11.  4
    Animate Intimacies.Astrida Neimanis - 2018 - Cultural Studies Review 24 (1):154-157.
    A review of Kath Weston. 'Animate Planet', Duke University Press, Durham, 2017.
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  12.  7
    Speculative Reproduction.Astrida Neimanis - 2014 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 4 (1):108-128.
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  13. Editorial Introduction.John Duncan, Astrida Neimanis & Bronwyn Singleton - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (1):i-x.
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  14. Editorial Introduction.Astrida Neimanis & John Duncan - 2010 - PhaenEx 5 (1):i-iv.
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