Results for 'Occasionalism'

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  1.  55
    Ibn Khaldun and Occasionalism.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Nazif Muhtaroglu (ed.), Occasionalism Revisited. Abu Dhabi - United Arab Emirates: pp. 61-82.
    Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) is said to be the first scholar to make history and society the direct objects of a systematic science. This paper will examine the role of occasionalism in his thought. This question is interesting because a perennial objection to occasionalism has been that it denies any real natural order, and therefore precludes the possibility of any systematic natural science. If Ibn Khaldun was an occasionalist, then it would mean that one of the earliest pioneers in (...)
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  2.  28
    Occasionalism in a Contemporary Context.Douglas Kutach & Özgür Koca - manuscript
    This essay was completed in January 2016 and accepted for publication in a collection on occasionalism by Nazif Muhtaroglu. It attempts to update the doctrine of occasionalism to make it independent of theism and fit better with contemporary physics and a modern understanding of causation. We find that modern physics provides an avenue to support the essential core of occasionalism.
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  3.  82
    Occasionalism: Causation Among the Cartesians.Steven Nadler - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    These essays examine the philosophical, scientific, theological and religious themes and arguments of occasionalism, as well as its roots in medieval views on ...
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  4. Boyle’s Reductive Occasionalism.Daniel Layman - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):2.
    Was Robert Boyle an occasionalist? And if so, what kind of occasionalist was he? These questions have long troubled commentators, as Boyle’s texts often seem to offer both endorsements of occasionalism and affirmations of bodies’ causal powers. I argue that Boyle’s position is best understood as reductive occasionalism, according to which bodily powers are relations between bodies and God’s action in the world, and there is no causal efficacy in bodies that is not strictly identical to God’s nomological (...)
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  5. Edwards' Occasionalism.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - In Don Schweitzer (ed.), Jonathan Edwards as Contemporary. Peter Lang. pp. 1-14.
    Instead of focusing on the Malebranche-Edwards connection regarding occasionalism as if minds are distinct from the ideas they have, I focus on how finite minds are particular expressions of God's will that there be the distinctions by which ideas are identified and differentiated. This avoids problems, created in the accounts of Fiering, Lee, and especially Crisp, about the inherently idealist character of Edwards' occasionalism.
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  6.  36
    Maclaurin on Occasionalism: A Reply to Ablondi.Patrick J. Connolly - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):125-135.
    In a recent article Fred Ablondi compares the different approaches to occasionalism put forward by two eighteenth-century Newtonians, Colin Maclaurin and Andrew Baxter. The goal of this short essay is to respond to Ablondi by clarifying some key features of Maclaurin's views on occasionalism and the cause of gravitational attraction. In particular, I explore Maclaurin's matter theory, his views on the explanatory limits of mechanism, and his appeals to the authority of Newton. This leads to a clearer picture (...)
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  7.  60
    Divine Conservation, Concurrence, and Occasionalism.Edward Ryan Moad - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (2):209-225.
    Occasionalism is the doctrine that relegates all real causal efficacy exclusively to God. This paper will aim to elucidate in some detail the metaphysical considerations that, together with certain common medieval theological axioms, constitute the philosophical steps leading to this doctrine. First, I will explain how the doctrine of divine conservation implies that we should attribute to divine power causal immediacy in every natural event and that it rules out mere conservationism as a model of the causal relation between (...)
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  8.  75
    Supernaturalism, Occasionalism, and Preformation in Malebranche.Karen Detlefsen - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):443-483.
    Malebranche is both an occasionalist and an advocate of the preformationist theory of generation. One might expect this given that he is a mechanist: passive matter cannot be the source of its own motion and so requires God to move it (occasionalism); and such matter, moving according to a few simple laws of motion, could never fashion something as complex as a living being, and so organisms must be fashioned by God at Creation (preformationism). This expectation finds a challenge (...)
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  9.  21
    Occasionalism and Contemporary Analyses of Causation.Edward Moad - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):361-381.
    This paper will survey the most prominent contemporary analyses of causation, and evaluate their compatibility, or otherwise, with the doctrine of Occasionalism, with the ultimate aim of formulating an occasionalist analysis of causation. Though reductive analyses of causation are incompatible with Occasionalism, it seems that the denial of reductionism is as well. I will suggest a solution to the problem, involving an analysis of causation as the relation of extensional identity, between God’s will that an event actually occur, (...)
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  10. Islamic Occasionalism, and its Critique by Averoës and Aquinas.Majid Fakhry - 1958 - London: Allen & Unwin.
    Originally published in 1958. Occasionalism is generally associated in the history of philosophy with the name of Malébranche. But long before this time, the Muslim Theologians of the ninth and tenth centuries had developed an occasionalist metaphysics of atoms and accidents. Arguing that a number of distinctively Islamic concepts such as fatalism and the surrender of personal endeavour cannot be fully understood except in the perspective of the occasionalist world view of Islam, the volume also discusses the attacks on (...)
     
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  11.  89
    Occasionalism and Non-Reductive Physicalism: Another Look at the Continuous Creation Argument.Daniel Lim - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (1):39-57.
    Malebranche’s so-called conservation is continuous creation (CCC) argument has been celebrated as a powerful and persuasive argument for Occasionalism—the claim that only God has and exercises causal powers. In this paper I want to examine the CCC argument for Occasionalism by comparing it to Jaegwon Kim’s so-called Supervenience argument against non-reductive physicalism. Because the arguments have deep similarities it is interesting and fruitful to consider them in tandem. First I argue that both the CCC argument and the Supervenience (...)
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  12.  10
    Occasionalism.Daniel Lim - 2015 - In God and Mental Causation. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer.
    Malebranche’s so-called Conservation is Continuous Creation Argument (CCCA) for Occasionalism can be construed as an instance of the Generalized Exclusion Argument. This shows that the CCCA and the two stages of the Supervenience Argument are isomorphic with respect to each other. This allows interlocutors in these disparate areas of philosophy to engage in fruitful dialogue.
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  13.  36
    Causation, Dispositions, and Physical Occasionalism.Walter J. Schultz & Lisanne D'Andrea-Winslow - 2017 - Zygon 52 (4):962-983.
    Even though theistic philosophers and scientists agree that God created, sustains, and providentially governs the physical universe and even though much has been published in general regarding divine action, what is needed is a fine-grained, conceptually coherent account of divine action, causation, dispositions, and laws of nature consistent with divine aseity, satisfying the widely recognized adequacy conditions for any account of dispositions.1 Such an account would be a basic part of a more comprehensive theory of divine action in relation to (...)
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  14. "No Necessary Connection": The Medieval Roots of the Occasionalist Roots of Hume.Steven Nadler - 1996 - The Monist 79 (3):448-466.
    In the not too distant past, it was common to treat Hume's skeptical doubts regarding the justification of our beliefs in causal connections—understood as necessary connections between objects or events—as having appeared per conceptionem immaculatam in his post-Cartesian mind. Thanks to recent efforts by scholars in early modern philosophy, however, we are now more informed about the roots of Hume's conclusions in Cartesian thought itself, especially the influence of Malebranche and his arguments for occasionalism. And by the research of (...)
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  15. Causal and Logical Necessity in Malebranche’s Occasionalism.A. R. J. Fisher - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):523-548.
    The famous Cartesian Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715) espoused the occasionalist doctrine that ‘there is only one true cause because there is only one true God; that the nature or power of each thing is nothing but the will of God; that all natural causes are not true causes but only occasional causes’ (LO, 448, original italics). One of Malebranche’s well-known arguments for occasionalism, known as, the ‘no necessary connection’ argument (or, NNC ) stems from the principle that ‘a true cause… (...)
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  16. Necessary Connections and Continuous Creation: Malebranche's Two Arguments for Occasionalism.Sukjae Lee - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):539-565.
    Malebranche presents two major arguments for occasionalism: the “no necessary connection” argument (NNC) and the “conservation is but continuous creation” argument (CCC). NNC appears prominently in his Search After Truth but virtually disappears and surrenders the spotlight to CCC in his later major work, Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion . This paper investigates the possible reasons and motivations behind this significant shift. I argue that the shift is no surprise if we consider the two ways in which the (...)
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  17. Divine Action and God’s Immutability: A Historical Case Study On How To Resist Occasionalism.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):115--135.
    Today’s debates present ”occasionalism’ as the position that any satisfying account of divine action must avoid. In this paper I discuss how a leading Cartesian author of the end of the seventeenth century, Pierre-Sylvain Régis, attempted to avoid occasionalism. Régis’s case is illuminating because it stresses both the difficulties connected with the traditional alternatives to occasionalism and also those aspects embedded in the occasionalist position that should be taken into due account. The paper focuses on Régis’s own (...)
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  18. Occasionalism and Strict Mechanism: Malebranche, Berkeley, Fontenelle.Lisa Downing - 2005 - In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 206-230.
    The rich connections between metaphysics and natural philosophy in the early modern period have been widely acknowledged and productively mined, thanks in no small part to the work of Margaret Wilson, whose book, Descartes, served as an inspirational example for a generation of scholars. The task of this paper is to investigate one particular such connection, namely, the relation between occasionalist metaphysics and strict mechanism. My focus will be on the work of Nicholas Malebranche, the most influential Cartesian philosopher after (...)
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  19. Occasionalism and General Will in Malebranche.Steven M. Nadler - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):31-47.
    This paper examines a common misreading of the mechanics of Malebranche's doctrine of divine causal agency, occasionalism, and its roots in a related misreading of Malebranche's theories. God, contrary to this misreading, is for Malebranche constantly and actively causally engaged in the world, and does not just establish certain laws of nature. The key is in understanding just what Malebranche means by general volitions'.
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  20. Causation, Intentionality, and the Case for Occasionalism.Walter Ott - 2008 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (2):165-187.
    Despite their influence on later philosophers such as Hume, Malebranche's central arguments for occasionalism remain deeply puzzling. Both the famous ‘no necessary connection’ argument and what I call the epistemic argument include assumptions – e.g., that a true cause is logically necessarily connected to its effect – that seem unmotivated, even in their context. I argue that a proper understanding of late scholastic views lets us see why Malebranche would make this assumption. Both arguments turn on the claim that (...)
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  21. Natures, Laws, and Miracles: The Roots of Leibniz's Critique of Occasionalism.Donald Rutherford - 1993 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 135--58.
    Leibniz raises three main objections to the doctrine of occasionalism: (1) it is inconsistent with the supposition of finite substances; (2) it presupposes the occurrence of "perpetual miracles"; (3) it requires that God "disturb" the ordinary laws of nature. At issue in objection (1) is the proper understanding of divine omnipotence, and of the relationship between the power of God and that of created things. I argue that objections (2) and (3), on the other hand, derive from a particular (...)
     
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  22.  79
    God, Evil, and Occasionalism.Matthew Shea & C. P. Ragland - 2018 - Religious Studies 54 (2):265-283.
    In a recent paper, Alvin Plantinga defends occasionalism against an important moral objection: if God is the sole direct cause of all the suffering that results from immoral human choices, this causal role is difficult to reconcile with God’s perfect goodness. Plantinga argues that this problem is no worse for occasionalism than for any of the competing views of divine causality; in particular, there is no morally relevant difference between God directly causing suffering and God indirectly causing it. (...)
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  23. François Lamy, Occasionalism, and the Mind-Body Problem.Fred Ablondi - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 619-629.
    There is a long-standing view that Malebranche and his fellow occasionalists accepted occasionalism to solve the problem of interaction between immaterial souls and extended bodies. Recently, however, scholars have shown this story to be a myth. Malebranche, Geulincx, La Forge, and Cordemoy adopted occasionalism for a variety of reasons, but none did so because of a need to provide a solution to a perceived mind-body problem. Yet there is one Cartesian for whom the “traditional” reading is largely on (...)
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  24.  46
    Cordemoy and Occasionalism.Steven M. Nadler - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):37-54.
    This is an examination of the nature and extent of Cordemoy's commitment to the doctrine of occasionalism.
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  25.  74
    Louis de la Forge and the Development of Occasionalism: Continuous Creation and the Activity of the Soul.Steven M. Nadler - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):215-231.
    Louis de La Forge and the Development of Occasionalism: Continuous Creation and the Activity of the Soul STEVEN NADLER THE DOCTRINE OF DIVINE CONSERVATION is a dangerous one. It is not theologi- cally dangerous, at least not in itself. From the thirteenth century onwards, and particularly with the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas, the notion of the continuous divine sustenance of the world of created things was, if not univer- sally accepted, a nonetheless common feature of theological orthodoxy, Chris- (...)
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  26.  92
    Malebranche and Occasionalism: A Reply to Steven Nadler.Desmond M. Clarke - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):499-504.
    In Malebranche's account of occasional causality, God exercises his general will with respect to every event that merits a causal explanation. Nadler distinguishes two pictures of God's involvement; (1) there are as many distinct acts of God's will as there are causal events to be explained; (2) God's will is exercised once only, when the natural order of causes is created. I argue that Malebranche's concept of God is inconsistent with a real distinction between God and acts of his will, (...)
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  27. God, Causation and Occasionalism.William F. Vallicella - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (1):3-18.
    The doctrine that there are no logically necessary connections in nature can be used to support both occasionalism, according to which God alone can be a cause, and 'anti-occasionalism', according to which God cannot be a cause. Quentin Smith has recently invoked the 'no logically necessary connections in nature' doctrine in support of the latter. I bring two main objections against his thesis that God (logically) cannot be a cause. The first is that there are good reasons to (...)
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  28. Causation in Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony.Steven NADLER (ed.) - 1992 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Three general accounts of causation stand out in early modern philosophy: Cartesian interactionism, occasionalism, and Leibniz's preestablished harmony. The contributors to this volume examine these theories in their philosophical and historical context. They address them both as a means for answering specific questions regarding causal relations and in their relation to one another, in particular, comparing occasionalism and the preestablished harmony as responses to Descartes's metaphysics and physics and the Cartesian account of causation. Philosophers discussed include Descartes, Gassendi, (...)
     
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  29.  3
    Occasionalism: From Metaphysics to Science Ed. By Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero, Mariangela Priarolo, and Emanuela Scribano.Fred Ablondi - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):404-405.
    This volume consists of papers originally presented at the international conference "Occasionalism: History and Problems," held in Venice in 2015; it contains twelve chapters, nine of which are in English, three in French. In their introduction, the editors describe occasionalism as a theory that was viewed by Medieval Christian philosophers as a "dangerous and treacherous" threat, only later to be "proudly asserted" in the post-Descartes era. This raises the question of to what degree this transition should be seen (...)
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  30.  97
    Al-Ghazali’s Occasionalism and the Natures of Creatures.Omar Edward Moad - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (2):95 - 101.
    Occasionalism is the doctrine that God is the sole immediate cause of all events, to the exclusion of any causal participation on the part of creatures. While this doctrine clearly has interesting implications with regard to causation and the philosophy of natural science, few have noticed that it also seems to entail, not only that creatures have no causal power whatsoever, but that they are completely devoid of intrinsic natures, conceived as intrinsic dispositional properties. In this paper, I will (...)
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  31.  1
    Living and Nonliving Occasionalism.Simon Weir - 2020 - Open Philosophy 3 (1):147-160.
    Graham Harman’s Object-Oriented Ontology has employed a variant of occasionalist causation since 2002, with sensual objects acting as the mediators of causation between real objects. While the mechanism for living beings creating sensual objects is clear, how nonliving objects generate sensual objects is not. This essay sets out an interpretation of occasionalism where the mediating agency of nonliving contact is the virtual particles of nominally empty space. Since living, conscious, real objects need to hold sensual objects as sub-components, but (...)
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  32.  52
    Malebranche’s Occasionalism.Alan Baker - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):251-272.
    The core thesis of Malebranche’s doctrine of occasionalism is that God is the sole true cause, where a true cause is one that has the power to initiate change and for which the mind perceives a necessary connection between it and its effects. Malebranche gives two separate arguments for his core thesis, T, based on necessary connection and on divine power respectively. The standard view is that these two arguments are necessary to establish T. I argue for a reinterpretation (...)
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  33.  31
    The Rise Of Cartesian Occasionalism.Andrew Russell Platt - unknown
    This study offers a new account of the development of Cartesian Occasionalism. The doctrine of Occasionalism - most famously advocated by Nicolas Malebranche - states that God alone is the cause of every event, and created substances are merely "occasional causes." In the years following René Descartes' death in 1650, several of his followers -- including Arnold Geulincx, Gerauld de Cordemoy and Louis de la Forge - argued for some version of this thesis. My study builds on recent (...)
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  34.  32
    Causation In Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony.Donald Felipe - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):156-157.
    This anthology contains ten essays and a brief introduction by the editor. Most of the essays discuss the development of occasionalism and preestablished harmony in major seventeenth-century thinkers and how these theories emerge from the background of Cartesian metaphysics, mechanistic physics, revealed theology, and traditional philosophy.
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  35.  10
    Malebranche’s Occasionalism: A Strategic Reinterpretation.Alan Baker - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):251-272.
    The core thesis of Malebranche’s doctrine of occasionalism is that God is the sole true cause, where a true cause is one that has the power to initiate change and for which the mind perceives a necessary connection between it and its effects. Malebranche gives two separate arguments for his core thesis, T, based on necessary connection and on divine power respectively. The standard view is that these two arguments are necessary to establish T. I argue for a reinterpretation (...)
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  36. Prolegomena to an Occasionalist Metaphysics.Edward Omar Moad - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    It is a fundamental doctrine of the Abrahamic religions, following from the belief in God as the creator, that He is the primary cause of all natural phenomena. Some, however, have gone further, to claim that God is the only cause. Consequently, there are no genuine created, or secondary, causes. The western tradition has coined the term 'occasionalism' for this doctrine, according to which all apparent instances of secondary causation are just that---instances of merely apparent, or occasional, causation. The (...)
     
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  37.  2
    2. Divine Conservation, Secondary Causes, and Occasionalism.Philip L. Quinn - 2019 - In Thomas V. Morris (ed.), Divine and Human Action: Essays in the Metaphysics of Theism. Cornell University Press. pp. 50-73.
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  38. Berkeley on Continuous Creation: Occasionalism Contained.Sukjae Lee - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 106-122.
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  39. How God Causes Motion: Descartes, Divine Sustenance, and Occasionalism.Daniel Garber - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (10):567-580.
  40. Descartes and Occasionalism.Daniel Garber - 1993 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 9--26.
     
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  41.  91
    Occasionalism and Mechanism: Fontenelle's Objections to Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):293 – 313.
  42. A New Occasionalism?Graham Harman - 2016 - In Bruno Latour & Peter Weibel (eds.), Reset Modernity! MIT Press. pp. 129-138.
     
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  43.  28
    Louis de La Forge and the 'Non-Transfer Argument' for Occasionalism.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):60-80.
    In this paper, I investigate Louis de La Forge's argument against body–body causation. His general strategy exploits the impossibility of bodies communicating their movement by transfer of motion. I call this the ‘non-transfer’ argument . NT allows La Forge both to reinterpret continuous creation in an occasionalistic fashion and to support his non-occasionalistic view concerning mind–body union. First, I present how NT emerges in Descartes’ own texts. Second, I show how La Forge recasts it to draw an occasionalistic account of (...)
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  44.  70
    Occasionalism and Efficacious Laws in Malebranche.Nicholas Jolley - 2002 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):245–257.
  45.  58
    The Occasionalist Proselytizer: A Modified Catechism.Hugh J. McCann & Jonathan L. Kvanvig - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:587-615.
  46.  32
    Boyle on Occasionalism: An Unexamined Source.Peter Anstey - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):57-81.
  47.  93
    Occasionalism and Occasional Causation in Descartes' Philosophy.David James Frederick Scott - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):503-528.
  48.  69
    What’s Wrong with Occasionalism?Katherin A. Rogers - 2001 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3):345-369.
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  49. Causal Powers and Occasionalism From Descartes to Malebranche.Desmond Clarke - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 131--48.
     
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  50.  70
    Occasionalism.Sukjae Lee - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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