Results for 'Pramāṇasamuccaya'

14 found
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  1. Self-Awareness in Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya and -Vṛtti: A Close Reading.Birgit Kellner - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):203-231.
    The concept of “self-awareness” ( svasaṃvedana ) enters Buddhist epistemological discourse in the Pramāṇasamuccaya and - vṛtti by Dignāga (ca. 480–540), the founder of the Buddhist logico-epistemological tradition. Though some of the key passages have already been dealt with in various publications, no attempt has been made to comprehensively examine all of them as a whole. A close reading is here proposed to make up for this deficit. In connection with a particularly difficult passage (PS(V) 1.8cd-10) that presents the (...)
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  2.  19
    Dignāga, On Perception, Being the Pratyakṣapariccheda of Dignāga's Pramāṇasamuccaya From the Sanskrit Fragments and the Tibetan versionsDignaga, On Perception, Being the Pratyaksapariccheda of Dignaga's Pramanasamuccaya From the Sanskrit Fragments and the Tibetan Versions.Alex Wayman & Masaaki Hattori - 1969 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 89 (2):434.
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    On the Interpretation of Pramānasamuccaya (Vrtti)I, 3d.Eli Franco - 1984 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (4):389-400.
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  4.  7
    New Sanskrit Fragments Of The Pramanasamuccaya.Shoryu Katsura - 1975 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 3 (March-April):67-78.
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  5.  12
    The Typology of Jāti-s Indicated by Diṅnāga and Development of Diṅnāga’s Thought.Sung Yong Kang - 2012 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (6):615-633.
    The exhaustive explications on jāti-s (sophisticated ripostes) and their seemingly chaotic arrangement in early Indian philosophical texts arouses an expectation for a systematic taxonomy or typology. Such taxonomy would enormously increase the heuristic value of the list of jāti-s. The present article aims to reveal some interpretational problems relevant to the understanding of the jāti-s’ historical development, as well as the theoretical implications of their typology. Focusing historically on the early texts of debate manuals of Nyāya and Buddhist circles, this (...)
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  6.  12
    Horns in Dignāga’s Theory of Apoha.Kei Kataoka - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (5):867-882.
    According to Dignāga, the word “cow” makes one understand all cows in a general form by excluding non-cows. However, how does one understand the non-cows to be excluded? Hattori answers as follows: “On perceiving the particular which is endowed with dewlap, horns, a hump on the back, and so forth, one understands that it is not a non-cow, because one knows that a non-cow is not endowed with these attributes.” Hattori regards observation of a dewlap, etc. as the cause of (...)
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  7.  20
    Remarks on the Origin of All-Inclusive Pervasion.Kiyokuni Shiga - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):521-534.
    Previous studies have claimed that the term ‘all-inclusive pervasion’ ( sarvopasaṃhāravyāpti ) appeared for the first time in the Hetubindu , and that it was Dharmakīrti who created this theory. This article attempts to modify this view and to show that the prototype of this theory can already be found in Dignāga’s system of logic. Dignāga states in the third chapter of the Pramāṇasamuccayavṛtti that the co-existence of a logical reason with what is to be proved is understood by means (...)
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  8.  12
    On the Argument of Infinite Regress in Proving Self-Awareness.King Lo - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):553-576.
    In PV 3.440ab and 473cd–474ab, Dharmakīrti raises the argument of infinite regress twice. The argument originates from the same argument stated by Dignāga in his Pramāṇasamuccaya 1.12ab1, in which the fault of infinite regress is called aniṣṭhā. In Pramāṇasamuccayavṛtti 1.12b2, Dignāga presents another type of argument of infinite regress driven by memory, which is elucidated by Dharmakīrtian commentators. The arguments were criticized by Kumārila Bhaṭṭa and Bhaṭṭa Jayanta and even more intensively so by two modern scholars, Jonardon Ganeri and (...)
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  9.  17
    Dignäga, On Perception. [REVIEW]J. H. P. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):747-747.
    This is the best book to date on Buddhist theory of perception as found in the Pramänasamuccaya of Dignäga, 480 to 540 A.D. The book offers seventy pages of translation, copious notes, and two Tibetan editions in transliteration of Dignäga's chapter on perception. The translation is strikingly good with the necessary additions carefully bracketed to allow as much as possible a fluent reading if one disregarded the brackets. The translation is a presentation of the theory of perception, an examination of (...)
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  10.  21
    Semantic Aspect of Buddhist Logic with Special Reference to Dinnaga and Dharmakirti.Pramod Kumar - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:167-183.
    Buddhist logicians have rejected the reality of universals on the one hand, and, on the other hand, given a substitute in the form of the doctrine of Apoha. The doctrine of apoha first appears in Dinnaga’s Pramanasamuccaya, according to which words and concepts are negative by their very nature. They proceed on thebasis of negation. They express their own meaning only by repudiating their opposite meaning. The Buddhist logicians talk of two types of knowledge, viz., pratyaksa, which is non- relational (...)
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  11.  10
    The Nyāyamukha and Udghaṭitajña.Yasutaka Muroya - 2017 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 45 (2):281-311.
    The Nyāyamukha by Dignāga, considered the founder of the Buddhist epistemological school, is known to have been studied intensively by East Asian Buddhists and scholars through Xuanzang’s Chinese translation. However, Jinendrabuddhi’s commentary on Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya offers a clue that helps to better understand the religio-philosophical and historical position of the Nyāyamukha in South and East Asia. The eighth-century commentator describes the Nyāyamukha as a work for highly intelligent persons and contrasts it to Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya. He also preserves fragments (...)
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  12.  17
    The Significance of Behaviour-Related Criteria for Textual Exegesis—and Their Neglect in Indian Studies.Claus Oetke - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (4):359-437.
    Against the background of the fact that speakers not seldom intend to convey imports which deviate from the linguistically expressed meanings of linguistic items, the present article addresses some consequences of this phenomenon which appear to still be neglected in textual studies. It is suggested that understanding behaviour is in some respect a primary objective of exegesis and that due attention must be attributed to the high diversity of behaviour-related criteria by which interpretations of linguistic items are to be evaluated. (...)
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  13. Theory of Apoha.Ramanath Pandey - 2010 - The Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 11:91-116.
    The present paper, ‘Theory of Apoha on the basis of the Pramanasamuccaya’, is based upon Dingnaga's principal philosophical treatise called Pramanasamuccaya and its commentary vritti . The main aim of this paper is to come to an understanding of Dingnåga's views on the doctrine of apoha (anyapoha), which seems to be most important to interpret the conventional signs that are of the words and sentences of human speech which are used by man conventionally. Thus the central concern of this doctrine (...)
     
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  14. Buddhist Theory of Perception with Special Reference to Pramāṇa Vārttika of Dharmakīrti.C. S. Vyas - 1991 - Navrang.
    Summary An attempt is made in this book to expound the Buddhist theory of perception as conceived by Dinnaga and Dharmkirti, especially as presented in Pramanavarttika of the latter. The study is divided into nine chapters. The first chapter deals with the Dinaga-Dharmakirti logico-epistemological sub-system within the overall system of Buddhist philosophy. The second chapter brings out the unique contribution of Pramanavarttika as a commentary to Pramanasamuccaya of Dinnaga. The third and fourth chapters are focused on the pre-Dinnaga and non-Buddhist (...)
     
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