Results for 'Recognition (Psychology)'

830 found
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  1.  15
    Recognition or Erasing of Religious Identities. Psychology of a Key Conflict in Religion.Antoine Vergote - 2005 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 27 (1):93-112.
    According to the author, psychology of religion should be the study of the personal experiences, tensions, conflicts and resolutions to conflict within a specific, clearly identified religion. The author opposes philosophical-psychological preconceptions which tend to eliminate the proper psychological reality of dynamic conflicts . With Freud, Evan-Pritchard and Needham, he affirms the historical dimension of civilizations and religions, and elaborates its consequences. He examines in this context work by Maslow on extrinsic and intrinsic religion and by Rokeach on mental-psychological dogmatism. (...)
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  2.  5
    Motor Imagery Theory of a Contralateral Handedness Effect in Recognition Memory: Toward a Chiral Psychology of Cognition.Maryanne Martin & Gregory V. Jones - 1999 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (3):265.
  3.  14
    From Folk Psychology to Deontology: Nancy Fraser on Redistribution and Recognition.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2005 - Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):127-144.
    Nancy Fraser has challenged the view that issues of identity are more central to political and social reform than attention to economic disparities. Fraser proposes a status model of recognition that treats recognition as a question of justice, rather than as a question of self-realization. In addition to appealing to the deontological, she also draws on folk paradigms and addresses them in a manner that reflects a sympathy with pragmatism. This article highlights difficulties that Fraser faces by incorporating (...)
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  4. Reconciling Social Science and Ethical Recognition: Hegelian Idealism and Brunswikian Psychology.Bo Earle - 2000 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (3):192-218.
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  5. Applied Cognitive and Cognitive Applied Psychology: The Case of Face Recognition.A. D. Baddeley - 1979 - In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research.
  6. The Self Across Psychology: Self-Recognition, Self-Awareness, and the Self Concept.James G. Snodgrass & R. L. Thompson (eds.) - 1997 - New York Academy of Sciences.
  7.  43
    Breaking the Rules: Examining the Facilitation Effects of Moral Intensity Characteristics on the Recognition of Rule Violations.David M. Wasieleski & Sefa Hayibor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):275-289.
    This research project seeks to discover whether certain characteristics of a moral issue facilitate individuals’ abilities to detect violators of a conditional rule. In business, conditional rules are often framed in terms of a social contract between employer and employee. Of significant concern to business ethicists is the fact that these social contracts are frequently breached. Some researchers in the field of evolutionary psychology argue that there is a biological basis to social contract formation and dissolution in business. However, although (...)
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  8.  99
    Rousseau's Theodicy of Self-Love: Evil, Rationality, and the Drive for Recognition.Frederick Neuhouser - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of Rousseau's rich and complex theory of the type of self-love (amour proper) that, for him, marks the central difference between humans and the beasts. Amour proper is the passion that drives human individuals to seek the esteem, approval, admiration, or love--the recognition--of their fellow beings. Neuhouser reconstructs Rousseau's understanding of what the drive for recognition is, why it is so problematic, and how its presence opens up far-reaching developmental possibilities for (...)
  9. Philosophy/Psychology Collaboration (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Five).Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez - manuscript
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
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  10.  43
    Development of Perceptual Expertise in Emotion Recognition.Seth D. Pollak, Michael Messner, Doris J. Kistler & Jeffrey F. Cohn - 2009 - Cognition 110 (2):242-247.
  11.  47
    Influences of Lexical Tone and Pitch on Word Recognition in Bilingual Infants.Leher Singh & Joanne Foong - 2012 - Cognition 124 (2):128-142.
  12. Perception and Cognition: The Analysis of Object Recognition.Ulrike Pompe - 2011 - Mentis.
  13.  61
    Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Evidence From Repetition Blindness.Irina M. Harris & Paul E. Dux - 2005 - Cognition 95 (1):73-93.
    The question of whether object recognition is orientation-invariant or orientation-dependent was investigated using a repetition blindness (RB) paradigm. In RB, the second occurrence of a repeated stimulus is less likely to be reported, compared to the occurrence of a different stimulus, if it occurs within a short time of the first presentation. This failure is usually interpreted as a difficulty in assigning two separate episodic tokens to the same visual type. Thus, RB can provide useful information about which representations (...)
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  14.  4
    The Unseen, the Discouraged and the Outcast: Expressivity and the Foundations of Social Recognition.Joona Taipale - 2018 - SATS 19 (1):21-39.
    This article analyzes different pathologies of social affirmation and examines the grounds of social recognition from the point of view of the concept of expression. The red thread of the text is provided by Tove Jansson’s fictional works, and the focus will be on three cases in particular. The article sets out from the phenomenological distinction between the sensible expression, on the one hand, and the expressed content, on the other. By focusing on the three cases, the article distinguishes (...)
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  15. Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates.C. M. Heyes - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, role-taking, and perspective-taking (...)
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  16.  24
    The Humanism of Sartre: Toward a Psychology of Dignity.John Iuculano & Keith Burkum - 1996 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):19-29.
    Discusses the significance of the concept of dignity for psychology. The article is grounded in the writings of E. Husserl and the humanism of Sartre and examines the humanistic position underlying psychology with that of positivism and determinism. Through an examination of Sartre's formulation of the cogito and intersubjectivity, the authors argue that humanism more than any other orientation current in psychology is concerned with the human status of the individual and the recognition of dignity as central to that (...)
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  17.  9
    Inescapable Moralities: Psychology as Public Philosophy.Suzanne R. Kirschner - 1993 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):87-89.
    Critical psychologists repeatedly lament the fact that we spend most of our time criticizing, unmasking and deconstructing prevailing psychological models, and rather less time rebuilding and reinventing them. Of course, important contributions have been made by theorists who present concrete alternatives to the theories and practices we challenge. Yet there have been relatively few attempts to articulate a guiding vision or visions of what we should be doing. This article discusses a symposium that was organized as an attempt to press (...)
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  18. The Free-Energy Principle: A Rough Guide to the Brain?Karl Friston - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):293-301.
  19. I: The Philosophy and Psychology of Personal Identity.J. Glover - 1988 - Penguin Books.
    This book relates work in neuroscience, psychology and psychiatry to questions about what a person is and the nature of a persons unity across a lifetime. The neuropsychiatry is now dated. The philosophy has three themes still perhaps of interest. The first is a response to Derek Parfits powerful and influential work on personal identity, which, like many other people, I discussed with him as he worked it out. I accept his view that there is no ego that owns the (...)
     
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  20.  55
    Mirror Self-Recognition and Symbol-Mindedness.Stephane Savanah - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy.
    Abstract The view that mirror self-recognition (MSR) is a definitive demonstration of self-awareness is far from universally accepted, and those who do support the view need a more robust argument than the mere assumption that self-recognition implies a self-concept (e.g. Gallup in Socioecology and Psychology of Primates, Mouton, Hague, 1975 ; Gallup and Suarez in Psychological Perspectives on the Self, vol 3, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, 1986 ). In this paper I offer a new argument in favour of the view (...)
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  21.  42
    The Sacred Heritage: The Influence of Shamanism on Analytical Psychology.Donald Sandner & Steven H. Wong (eds.) - 1997 - Routledge.
    Although in modern times and clinical settings, we rarely see the old characteristics of tribal shamanism such as deep trances, out-of-body experiences, and soul retrieval, the archetypal dreams, waking visions and active imagination of modern depth psychology represents a liminal zone where ancient and modern shamanism overlaps with analytical psychology. These essays explore the contributors' excursions as healers and therapists into this zone. The contributors describe the many facets shamanism and depth psychology have in common: animal symbolism; recognition of (...)
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  22.  65
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex.Adam R. Aron, Trevor W. Robbins & Russell A. Poldrack - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):170-177.
  23.  82
    The Self in Action: Lessons From Delusions of Control.Chris Frith - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):752-770.
    Patients with delusions of control are abnormally aware of the sensory consequences of their actions and have difficulty with on-line corrections of movement. As a result they do not feel in control of their movements. At the same time they are strongly aware of the action being intentional. This leads them to believe that their actions are being controlled by an external agent. In contrast, the normal mark of the self in action is that we have very little experience of (...)
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  24. Parietal Lobe Contributions to Episodic Memory Retrieval.A. D. Wagner, B. J. Shannon, I. Kahn & R. L. Buckner - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):445-453.
  25.  52
    Capgras Delusion: An Interactionist Model.Garry Young - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):863-876.
    In this paper I discuss the role played by disturbed phenomenology in accounting for the formation and maintenance of the Capgras delusion. Whilst endorsing a two-stage model to explain the condition, I nevertheless argue that traditional accounts prioritise the role played by some form of second-stage cognitive disruption at the expense of the significant contribution made by the patient’s disturbed phenomenology, which is often reduced to such uninformative descriptions as “anomalous” or “strange”. By advocating an interactionist model, I argue that (...)
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  26.  30
    Is It or Isn't It? Phenomenology as Descriptive Psychology in the Logical Investigations.John Scanlon - 2001 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 32 (1):1-11.
    This article looks back at some aspects of the heritage of Edmund Husserl's Logical Investigations on the occasion of that work's centennial, following some clues Husserl offered in his own 1925 retrospective evaluation. The themes pursued are: Dilthey's surprisingly enthusiastic appreciation of the work; Husserl's subsequent recognition of the kernel of truth in psychologism; the complex question of phenomenology as descriptive psychology; and, finally, the distinctive view of mental life introduced in that work.
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  27.  6
    Environmental Inversion Effects in Face Perception.Nicolas Davidenko & Stephen J. Flusberg - 2012 - Cognition 123 (3):442-447.
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  28. Zwischen Normativität Und Normalität: Theorie Und Praxis der Anerkennung in Interdisziplinärer Perspektive.Claudia Czycholl, Inge Marszolek & Peter C. Pohl (eds.) - 2010 - Klartext.
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  29. Disjunctivism and Perceptual Psychology.Tyler Burge - 2005 - Philosophical Topics 33 (1):1-78.
    This essay is a long one. It is not meant to be read in a single sitting. Its structure is as follows. In section I, I explicate perceptual anti-individualism. Section II centers on the two aspects of the representational content of perceptual states. Sections III and IV concern the nature of the empirical psychology of vision, and its bearing on the individuation of perceptual states. Section V shows how what is known from empirical psychology undermines disjunctivism and hence certain further (...)
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  30. Agency, Simulation and Self-Identification.Marc Jeannerod & Elisabeth Pacherie - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (2):113-146.
    This paper is concerned with the problem of selfidentification in the domain of action. We claim that this problem can arise not just for the self as object, but also for the self as subject in the ascription of agency. We discuss and evaluate some proposals concerning the mechanisms involved in selfidentification and in agencyascription, and their possible impairments in pathological cases. We argue in favor of a simulation hypothesis that claims that actions, whether overt or covert, are centrally simulated (...)
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  31. Impure Phenomenology: Dilthey, Epistemology, and the Task of Interpretive Psychology.Eric S. Nelson - 2010 - Studia Phaenomenologica 10:19-44.
    Responding to critiques of Dilthey's interpretive psychology, I revisit its relation with epistemology and the human sciences. Rather than reducing knowledge to psychology and psychology to subjective understanding, Dilthey articulated the epistemic worth of a psychology involving (1) an impure phenomenology of embodied, historically-situated, and worldly consciousness as individually lived yet complicit with its naturally and socially constituted contexts, (2) experience- and communication-oriented processes of interpreting others, (3) the use of third-person structural-functional analysis and causal explanation, and (4) a (...) of the ungroundability, facticity, and conflict inherent in knowledge and life. (shrink)
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  32.  19
    “Love is Only Between Living Beings Who Are Equal in Power”: On What is Alive (and What is Dead) in Hegel's Account of Marriage.Gal Katz - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy.
    The paper develops a conception of marital love as a complex recognitive relation, which I articulate by juxtaposing it against other recognitive relations that figure in Hegel's theory of modern civil society (i.e., respect and esteem). Drawing on Hegel's early writings, I argue that, if love is to provide its unique sort of recognition, it must obtain between “living beings who are equal in power”—a peculiar form of equality that I name (drawing on Stanley Cavell's work) “dynamic equality.” I (...)
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  33.  1
    Mirror Self-Recognition and Symbol-Mindedness.Stephane Savanah - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):657-673.
    The view that mirror self-recognition (MSR) is a definitive demonstration of self-awareness is far from universally accepted, and those who do support the view need a more robust argument than the mere assumption that self-recognition implies a self-concept (e.g. Gallup in Socioecology and Psychology of Primates, Mouton, Hague, 1975 ; Gallup and Suarez in Psychological Perspectives on the Self, vol 3, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, 1986 ). In this paper I offer a new argument in favour of the view that (...)
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  34.  78
    Defending Realism on the Proper Ground.Athanassios Raftopoulos - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (1):47-77.
    'Epistemological constructivism' holds that vision is mediated by background preconceptions and is theory-laden. Hence, two persons with differing theoretical commitments see the world differently and they could agree on what they see only if they both espoused the same conceptual framework. This, in its turn, undermines the possibility of theory testing and choice on a common theory-neutral empirical basis. In this paper, I claim that the cognitive sciences suggest that a part of vision may be only indirectly penetrated by cognition (...)
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  35.  27
    A Comparison of the Self-Awareness and Kinesthetic-Visual Matching Theories of Self-Recognition: Autistic Children and Others.Robert W. Mitchell - 1997 - In James G. Snodgrass & R. Thompson (eds.), The Self Across Psychology: Self-Recognition, Self-Awareness, and the Self Concept. New York Academy of Sciences.
  36.  39
    Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot.Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the data have (...)
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  37.  47
    Canonical Affordances: The Psychology of Everyday Things.Alan Costall & Ann Richards - 2013 - In Paul Graves-Brown, Rodney Harrison & Angela Piccini (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Contemporary World. Oxford University Press. pp. 82.
    Psychologists have had very little to say about things. Things are one thing, people are another. There is now, however, a growing recognition of the importance of things within human psychology. But, in cognitive theory, the meanings of things are usually radically subjectivized. ‘Their’ meanings are really ‘our’ meanings that we mentally project upon them. James Gibson’s concept of affordances was an attempt to avoid subject–object dualism by defining the meanings of things-what we can do with them-as properties of (...)
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  38.  36
    Recognition and Resentment in the Confucian Analects.Eric S. Nelson - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (2):287-306.
    Early Confucian “moral psychology” developed in the context of undoing reactive emotions in order to promote relationships of reciprocal recognition. Early Confucian texts diagnose the pervasiveness of reactive emotions under specific social conditions and respond with the ethical-psychological mandate to counter them in self-cultivation. Undoing negative affects is a basic element of becoming ethically noble, while the ignoble person is fixated on limited self-interested concerns and feelings of being unrecognized. Western ethical theory typically accepts equality and symmetry as conditions (...)
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  39.  21
    Outline of the Relationship Among Transcendental Phenomenology, Phenomenological Psychology, and the Sciences of Persons.Frederick J. Wertz - 2016 - Schutzian Research 8:139-162.
    Husserl focused perhaps more than any other philosopher on the relationship between philosophy and psychology. This problem was important to him because the European project of universal science must include sciences of consciousness that address questions of meaning, value and purpose so crucial for humanity. This paper provides a sketch of the later Husserl’s thinking on this issue in order to clarify the relationships among transcendental philosophy as the mother of the sciences, psychology as the foundational mental science, and the (...)
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  40. Shadow, Self, Spirit: Essays in Transpersonal Psychology.Michael Daniels - 2005 - Imprint Academic.
    Transpersonal Psychology concerns the study of those states and processes in which people experience a deeper sense of who they are, or a greater sense of connectedness with others, with nature, or the spiritual dimension. Pioneered by respected researchers such as Jung, Maslow and Tart, it has nonetheless struggled to find recognition among mainstream scientists. Now that is starting to change. Dr. Michael Daniels teaches the subject as part of a broadly-based psychology curriculum, and this book brings together the (...)
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  41. Mental Vs. Embodied Models of Mirrored Self-Recognition: Some Preliminary Considerations.John L. Schwenkler - 2008 - In B. Hardy-Valeé & N. Payette (eds.), Beyond the Brain: Embodied, Situated, and Distributed Cognition. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    A considerable body of recent work in developmental psychology and animal behavior has addressed the cognitive processes required to recognize oneself in a mirror. Most models of such "mirrored self-recognition" (MSR) treat it as the result of inferential processes drawing on the subject’s possession of some sort of mature "self-awareness". The present chapter argues that such an approach to MSR is not obligatory, and suggests some empirical grounds for rejecting it. We also sketch the outlines of an alternative, "embodied" (...)
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  42.  7
    Self-Unity, Identification and Self-Recognition.Emer O’Hagan - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (3):775-789.
    The concept of identification is often appealed to in explanations of how it is that some actions are authored by an agent, and so autonomous, or free. Over the last several decades, different conceptions of identification have been advanced and refined, and the term is now commonplace in moral psychology and metaethics. In this paper I argue that two dominant accounts of identification implicated in self-unity fail to acknowledge the significance of a related form of self-unifying activity, self-recognition. Self- (...) is self-authoring because it involves identification with a new description of oneself, but it is excluded by standard accounts of identification which over-emphasize action and volition in autonomous agency. Although self-recognition is unlikely to produce immediate action, it accords with the activity of self-unity that is said to be constitutive of identification. (shrink)
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  43.  27
    Act Psychology and Phenomenology: Husserl on Egoic Acts.Benjamin Sheredos - 2017 - Husserl Studies 33 (3):191-209.
    Husserl famously retracted his early portrayal, in Logische Untersuchungen, of phenomenology as empirical psychology. Previous scholarship has typically understood this transcendental turn in light of the Ideen’s revised conception of the ἐποχή, and its distinction between noesa and noemata. This essay thematizes the evolution of the concept of mental acts in Husserl’s work as a way of understanding the shift. I show how the recognition of the pure ego in Ideen I and II enabled Husserl to radically alter his (...)
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  44.  11
    Self-Unity, Identification and Self-Recognition.Emer O’Hagan - 2018 - Philosophia:1-15.
    The concept of identification is often appealed to in explanations of how it is that some actions are authored by an agent, and so autonomous, or free. Over the last several decades, different conceptions of identification have been advanced and refined, and the term is now commonplace in moral psychology and metaethics. In this paper I argue that two dominant accounts of identification implicated in self-unity fail to acknowledge the significance of a related form of self-unifying activity, self-recognition. Self- (...) is self-authoring because it involves identification with a new description of oneself, but it is excluded by standard accounts of identification which over-emphasize action and volition in autonomous agency. Although self-recognition is unlikely to produce immediate action, it accords with the activity of self-unity that is said to be constitutive of identification. (shrink)
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  45.  71
    The Necessity of “Necessity”: Hume’s Psychology of Sophisticated Causal Inference.Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):263-287.
    Much of what Hume calls probable reasoning is deliberate and reflective. Since there are aspects to Hume’s psychology that tempt some commentators to think, on the contrary, that for Hume all such reasoning is simple and immediate, I will be concerned to emphasize Hume’s recognition of the sophisticated sort of probable reasoning (section I). Though some of the details of my case may be new, the overall point of this section should not be news to recent scholarship. But once (...)
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  46.  24
    Viewpoint Costs Occur During Consolidation: Evidence From the Attentional Blink.Paul E. Dux & Irina M. Harris - 2007 - Cognition 104 (1):47-58.
    Do the previous termviewpoint costsnext term incurred when naming rotated familiar objects arise during initial identification or during previous termconsolidation?next term To answer this question we employed an attentional blink (AB) task where two target objects appeared amongst a rapid stream of distractor objects. Our assumption was that while both targets and distractors undergo initial identification only targets are consolidated in a form that allows overt report. We presented line drawings of objects with a usual upright canonical orientation, and separately (...)
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  47.  18
    The Psychology of Maine de Biran. [REVIEW]S. M. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):763-764.
    This admittedly sympathetic exposition of Maine de Biran's psychology represents a competent and comprehensive introduction into the main philosophical thought of the French thinker and into the conditions and value of his published and unpublished writings as well as of the literature dealing with his life and work. It is inspired by the conviction that there is a need for this new addition to the vast bibliography of the philosopher, not only because Biran is almost without readers in the English (...)
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  48.  18
    Projectivism Psychologized: The Philosophy and Psychology of Disgust.Daniel R. Kelly - unknown
    This dissertation explores issues in the philosophy of psychology and metaphysics through the lens of the emotion of disgust, and its corresponding property, disgustingness. The first chapter organizes an extremely large body of data about disgust, imposes two constraints any theory must meet, and offers a cognitive model of the mechanisms underlying the emotion. The second chapter explores the evolution of disgust, and argues for the Entanglement thesis: this uniquely human emotion was formed when two formerly distinct mechanisms, one dedicated (...)
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  49.  4
    Participation in Christ’s Body and His Blood During Celebration of Holy Communion as Illuminated by the Meaningful Lenses of Cognition and Recognition.Ferdi P. Kruger - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (1):1-11.
    In this article, the author focusses on the importance and possible value of the concepts of cognition and recognition for reflection on what should actually happen during celebration of Holy Communion. The point of departure is that celebration, in essence, means that it should be a meaningful experience. The meaningfulness consists of the intriguing fact that participants are participating in Christ’s body and in his blood while celebrating Holy Communion. In celebrating Holy Communion, people are engaging in a ritual (...)
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  50.  9
    Towards a Kantian Moral Psychology or the Practical Effects of Self-Predicating Judgements of Sublimity.Aaron Jaffe - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (1):88-106.
    This essay develops an account of the link between Kant's aesthetics and his ethics. It does so by articulating a Kantian account of moral psychology by way of aesthetic reflective judgements of sublimity. Since judgements of sublimity enrich the picture of a Kantian subject by forcefully revealing the unbounded power of the faculty of reason, I investigate the possibility that judgements of this kind could serve as a basis for moral motivation. The paper first shows how judgements of sublimity help (...)
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