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W. H. D. Rouse [85]Joseph Rouse [67]Fenella Rouse [12]David L. Rouse [7]
Richard H. Rouse [4]Mary A. Rouse [3]Richard Rouse [3]R. H. Rouse [3]

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Joseph Rouse
Wesleyan University
Julie Rouse
Walden University
  1. Knowledge and power: toward a political philosophy of science.Joseph Rouse - 1987 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    This lucidly written book examines the social and political significance of the natural sciences through a detailed and original account of science as an interpretive social practice.
  2.  43
    Engaging science: how to understand its practices philosophically.Joseph Rouse - 1996 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Summarizing this century's major debates over realism and the rationality of scientific knowledge, Joseph Rouse believes that these disputes oversimplify the ...
  3.  49
    How Scientific Practices Matter: Reclaiming Philosophical Naturalism.Joseph Rouse - 2002 - University of Chicago Press.
    How can we understand the world as a whole instead of separate natural and human realms? Joseph T. Rouse proposes an approach to this classic problem based on radical new conceptions of both philosophical naturalism and scientific practice.
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  4.  25
    Articulating the World: Conceptual Understanding and the Scientific Image.Joseph Rouse - 2015 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Naturalism as a guiding philosophy for modern science both disavows any appeal to the supernatural or anything else transcendent to nature, and repudiates any philosophical or religious authority over the workings and conclusions of the sciences. A longstanding paradox within naturalism, however, has been the status of scientific knowledge itself, which seems, at first glance, to be something that transcends and is therefore impossible to conceptualize within scientific naturalism itself. In Articulating the World, Joseph Rouse argues that the most pressing (...)
  5. Engaging Science: How to Understand Its Practices Philosophically.Joseph Rouse - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):359-364.
     
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  6.  39
    Knowledge and Power: Toward a Political Philosophy of Science.Robert Ackermann & Joseph Rouse - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (3):474.
  7. Social practices and normativity.Joseph Rouse - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):46-56.
    The Social Theory of Practices effectively criticized conceptions of social practices as rule-governed or regularity-exhibiting performances. Turner’s criticisms nevertheless overlook an alternative, "normative" conception of practices as constituted by the mutual accountability of their performances. Such a conception of practices also allows a more adequate understanding of normativity in terms of accountability to what is at issue and at stake in a practice. We can thereby understand linguistic practice and normative authority without having to posit stable meanings, rules, norms, or (...)
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  8.  72
    Null.Doohwan Ahn, Sanda Badescu, Giorgio Baruchello, Raj Nath Bhat, Laura Boileau, Rosalind Carey, Camelia-Mihaela Cmeciu, Alan Goldstone, James Grieve, John Grumley, Grant Havers, Stefan Höjelid, Peter Isackson, Marguerite Johnson, Adrienne Kertzer, J.-Guy Lalande, Clinton R. Long, Joseph Mali, Ben Marsden, Peter Monteath, Michael Edward Moore, Jeff Noonan, Lynda Payne, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Brayton Polka, Lily Polliack, John Preston, Anthony Pym, Marina Ritzarev, Joseph Rouse, Peter N. Saeta, Arthur B. Shostak, Stanley Shostak, Marcia Landy, Kenneth R. Stunkel, I. I. I. Wheeler & Phillip H. Wiebe - 2009 - The European Legacy 14 (6):731-771.
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  9. Power? Knowledge.Joseph Rouse - 2005 - In Gary Gutting (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  10.  54
    Temporal Externalism and the Normativity of Linguistic Practice.Joseph Rouse - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 8 (1):20–38.
    Temporal externalists expand Putnam’s and Burge’s semantic externalisms to argue that later uses of words transform the semantic significance of earlier uses. Conflicting intuitions about temporal externalism often turn on different conceptions of linguistic practice, which have mostly not been thematically explicated. I defend a version of temporal externalism that replaces the familiar regularist and normative-regulist conceptions of linguistic practice or use. This alternative identifies practices neither by regularities of use, nor by determinate norms governing their constituent performances, but by (...)
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  11.  37
    Philosophy of science and the persistent narratives of modernity.Joseph Rouse - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):141-162.
  12.  64
    Vampires: Social constructivism, realism, and other philosophical undead.Joseph Rouse - 2002 - History and Theory 41 (1):60–78.
    Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science by Andre Kukla The Social Construction of What? by Ian Hacking.
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  13. The politics of postmodern philosophy of science.Joseph Rouse - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (4):607-627.
    Modernism in the philosophy of science demands a unified story about what makes an inquiry scientific (or a successful science). Fine's "natural ontological attitude" (NOA) is "postmodern" in joining trust in local scientific practice with suspicion toward any global interpretation of science to legitimate or undercut that trust. I consider four readings of this combination of trust and suspicion and their consequences for the autonomy and cultural credibility of the sciences. Three readings take respectively Fine's trusting attitude, his emphasis upon (...)
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  14. Recovering Thomas Kuhn.Joseph Rouse - 2013 - Topoi 32 (1):59-64.
    The interpretive plasticity of Kuhn’s philosophical work has been reinforced by readings informed by other philosophical, historiographic or sociological projects. This paper highlights several aspects of Kuhn’s work that have been neglected by such readings. First, Kuhn’s early contribution to several subsequent philosophical developments has been unduly neglected. Kuhn’s postscript discussion of “exemplars” should be recognized as one of the earliest versions of a conception of theories as “mediating models.” Kuhn’s account of experimental practice has also been obscured by readings (...)
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  15.  68
    Husserlian phenomenology and scientific realism.Joseph Rouse - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (2):222-232.
    Husserl's (1970) discussion of "Galilean science" is often dismissed as naïvely instrumentalist and hostile to science. He has been explicitly criticized for misunderstanding idealization in science, for treating the lifeworld as a privileged conceptual framework, and for denying that science can in principle completely describe the world (because ordinary prescientific concepts are irreplaceable). I clarify Husserl's position concerning realism, and use this to show that the first two criticisms depend upon misinterpretations. The third criticism is well taken. Nevertheless, this is (...)
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  16.  52
    The narrative reconstruction of science.Joseph Rouse - 1990 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):179 – 196.
    In contrast to earlier accounts of the epistemic significance of narrative, it is argued that narrative is important in natural scientific knowledge. To recognize this, we must understand narrative not as a literary form in which knowledge is written, but as the temporal organization of the understanding of practical activity. Scientific research is a social practice, whereby researchers structure the narrative context in which past work is interpreted and significant possibilities for further work are projected. This narrative field displays a (...)
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  17.  30
    Feminism and the social construction of scientific knowledge.Joseph Rouse - 1996 - In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. pp. 195--215.
  18.  79
    Articulating the World: Experimental Systems and Conceptual Understanding.Joseph Rouse - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (3):243 - 254.
    Attention to scientific practice offers a novel response to philosophical queries about how conceptual understanding is empirically accountable. The locus of the issue is thereby shifted, from perceptual experience to experimental and fieldwork interactions. More important, conceptual articulation is shown to be not merely ?spontaneous? and intralinguistic, but instead involves a establishing a systematic domain of experimental operations. The importance of experimental practice for conceptual understanding is especially clearly illustrated by cases in which entire domains of scientific investigation were first (...)
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  19.  78
    Merleau-ponty and the existential conception of science.Joseph Rouse - 1986 - Synthese 66 (2):249 - 272.
  20.  70
    New philosophies of science in north America — twenty years later.Joseph Rouse - 1998 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 29 (1):71-122.
    This survey of major developments in North American philosophy of science begins with the mid-1960s consolidation of the disciplinary synthesis of internalist history and philosophy of science (HPS) as a response to criticisms of logical empiricism. These developments are grouped for discussion under the following headings: historical metamethodologies, scientific realisms, philosophies of the special sciences, revivals of empiricism, cognitivist naturalisms, social epistemologies, feminist theories of science, studies of experiment and the disunity of science, and studies of science as practice and (...)
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  21.  34
    Great dialogues of Plato: complete text of The republic, The apology, Crito, Phaedo, Ion, Meno, Symposium. Plato, William Henry Denham Rouse & Matthew S. Santirocco - 1956 - New York: Signet Classic. Edited by W. H. D. Rouse & Matthew S. Santirocco.
    Ion -- Meno (Menon) -- Symposium (The banquet) -- The republic -- The apology (The defence of Socrates) -- Crito (Criton) -- Phaedo (Phaidon) -- The Greek alphabet -- Pronouncing index.
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  22.  66
    Kuhn, Heidegger, and scientific realism.Joseph Rouse - 1981 - Man and World 14 (3):269-290.
  23.  78
    Standpoint Theories Reconsidered.Joseph Rouse - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):200 - 209.
  24. Mind, body, and world: Todes and McDowell on bodies and language.Joseph Rouse - 2005 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):38-61.
    Dreyfus presents Todes's (2001) republished Body and World as an anticipatory response to McDowell (1994) which shows how preconceptual perception can ground conceptual thought. I argue that Dreyfus is mistaken on this point: Todes's claim that perceptual experience is preconceptual presupposes an untenable account of conceptual thought. I then show that Todes nevertheless makes two important contributions to McDowell's project. First, he develops an account of perception as bodily second nature, and as a practical-perceptual openness to the world, which constructively (...)
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  25. Anthropology Today: An Encyclopedic Survey.A. L. Kroeber, Sol Tax, Loren C. Eiseley, Irving Rouse & Carl F. Voegelin - 1953 - Science and Society 17 (4):365-370.
  26.  37
    Policing knowledge: Disembodied policy for embodied knowledge.Joseph Rouse - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 34 (3-4):353 – 364.
    Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology offers a constructive program for integrating philosophy and sociology of science as normative knowledge policy, constrained by the linguistic, psychological, social, and political embodiment of knowledge. I endorse and elaborate upon Fuller's insistence that science studies should take seriously the embodiment of knowledge, but criticize his conception of knowledge policy on three grounds. Knowledge policy as Fuller conceives it seems committed to an untenable conception of a value?free or politically neutral social science. Knowledge policy studies are (...)
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  27.  19
    PSDA in the Clinic.F. Rouse, S. Johnson, D. W. Brock, L. Emanuel, S. M. Wolf, D. Mason, M. Mezey, R. B. Purtilo & E. L. McCloskey - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5):S6-S7.
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  28.  16
    Remedios and Fuller on normativity and science.Joseph Rouse - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):464-471.
  29.  5
    Heidegger's Later Philosophy of Science.Joseph Rouse - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):75-92.
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  30. Arguing for the Natural Ontological Attitude.Joseph Rouse - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:294 - 301.
    Arthur Fine has recently argued that standard realist and anti-realist interpretations of science should be replaced by "natural ontological attitude" (NOA). I ask whether Fine's own justification for NOA can meet the standards of argument that underlie his criticisms of realism and anti-realism. Fine vacillates between two different ways of advocating NOA. The more minimalist defense ("why not try NOA?") begs the question against both realists and antirealists. A stronger program, based on Fine's arguments for a "no-theory" of truth, has (...)
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  31.  27
    Barad's Feminist Naturalism.Joseph Rouse - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):142-161.
    Philosophical naturalism is ambiguous between conjoining philosophy with science or with nature understood scientifically. Reconciliation of this ambiguity is necessary but rarely attempted. Feminist science studies often endorse the former naturalism but criticize the second. Karen Barad's agential realism, however, constructively reconciles both senses. Barad then challenges traditional metaphysical naturalisms as not adequately accountable to science. She also contributes distinctively to feminist reinterpretations of objectivity as agential responsibility, and of agency as embodied, worldly, and intra-active.
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  32. Two concepts of practices.Joseph Rouse - 2001 - In Theodore R. Schatzki, K. Knorr-Cetina & Eike von Savigny (eds.), The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge. pp. 189--198.
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  33. Barad's feminist naturalism.Joseph Rouse - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):142-161.
    : Philosophical naturalism is ambiguous between conjoining philosophy with science or with nature understood scientifically. Reconciliation of this ambiguity is necessary but rarely attempted. Feminist science studies often endorse the former naturalism but criticize the second. Karen Barad's agential realism, however, constructively reconciles both senses. Barad then challenges traditional metaphysical naturalisms as not adequately accountable to science. She also contributes distinctively to feminist reinterpretations of objectivity as agential responsibility, and of agency as embodied, worldly, and intra-active.
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  34.  3
    Heidegger on Science and Naturalism.Joseph Rouse - 2005 - In Gary Gutting (ed.), Continental Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 121–141.
    This chapter contains section titled: Science and Philosophy in Being and Time BACHELARD The End of Philosophy and the Task of Thinking.
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  35.  37
    The Radical Naturalism of Naturalistic Philosophy of Science.Joseph Rouse - 2023 - Topoi 42 (3):719-732.
    Naturalism in the philosophy of science has proceeded differently than the familiar forms of meta-philosophical naturalism in other sub-fields, taking its cues from “science as we know it” (Cartwright in The Dappled World, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999, p. 1) rather than from a philosophical conception of “the Scientific Image.” Its primary focus is scientific practice, and its philosophical analyses are complementary and accountable to empirical studies of scientific work. I argue that naturalistic philosophy of science is nevertheless criterial for (...)
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  36.  4
    Arguing for the Natural Ontological Attitude.Joseph Rouse - 1988 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988 (1):294-301.
    In several recent papers, Arthur Fine has developed a far-reaching attack upon both the standard realist interpretations of science and their most prominent anti-realist alternatives (1986a, 1986b, 1986c). In their place, Fine proposes not another position on the realist/anti-realist axis, but an attitude toward science, the “natural ontological attitude” (NOA), which is supposed to remove any felt need for a philosophical interpretation of science.In this paper I will be concerned with Fine’s reasons for adopting NOA rather than his arguments against (...)
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  37.  50
    Mechanisms as Modal Patterns.Joseph Rouse - unknown
    Philosophical discussions of mechanisms and mechanistic explanation have often been framed by contrast to laws and deductive-nomological explanation. A more adequate conception of lawfulness and nomological necessity, emphasizing the role of modal considerations in scientific reasoning, circumvents such contrasts and enhances understanding of mechanisms and their scientific significance. The first part of the paper sketches this conception of lawfulness, drawing upon Haugeland, Lange, and Rouse. This conception emphasizes the role of lawful stability under relevant counterfactual suppositions in scientific reasoning across (...)
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  38.  44
    Intentionality and the Myths of the Given.Joseph Rouse - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):766-770.
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  39.  36
    Epistemological derangement.Joseph Rouse - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):835-847.
  40.  12
    Case Studies: Prehospital DNR Orders.Kenneth V. Iserson & Fenella Rouse - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (6):17.
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  41.  44
    Heidegger’s Later Philosophy of Science.Joseph Rouse - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):75-92.
  42.  9
    3. Interpretation in Natural and Human Science.Joseph Rouse - 1991 - In David R. Hiley, James Bohman & Richard Shusterman (eds.), The Interpretive turn: philosophy, science, culture. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. pp. 42-56.
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  43.  19
    Mrs. Wanglie and “Doctor Knows Best” and Making Decisions for Those Who Cannot Decide for Themselves: Autonomy in Two Recent Cases.Fenella Rouse - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (2):165.
    Since at least the Karen Ann Quinlan case, the idea of autonomy has always been central to the discussion about whether to given life-prolonging treatment. Those on different sides of the debate may disagree strongly about some of the issues, but the importance of the patient's autonomy has been accepted by people of widely different points of view.
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  44.  3
    Egocracy: Marx, Freud and Lacan.Sonia Arribas & Howard Rouse - 2011 - Diaphanes.
    This book tries to bring together the work of Marx, Freud and Lacan. It does this not by enumerating what might stereotypically be considered to be the central theses of these authors and then proceeding to combine them – a method that is inevitably doomed to failure – but instead by confronting each one of their oeuvres with what might best be described as its extimate core. The work of Marx is confronted with a problematic that implicitly, and at times (...)
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  45.  39
    Achievement and Inclusion in Schools.Kristine Black-Hawkins, Lani Florian & Martyn Rouse - 2016 - Routledge.
    There is an enduring and widespread perception amongst policy makers and practitioners that certain groups of children, in particular those who find learning difficult, have a detrimental effect on the achievement of other children. Challenging this basic assumption, this award-winning book argues that high levels of inclusion can be entirely compatible with high levels of achievement and that combining the two is not only possible but essential if all children are to have the opportunity to participate fully in education. This (...)
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  46.  13
    The effect of inter-sensory stimulation on dark adaptation and night vision.A. Chapanis, R. O. Rouse & Stanley Schachter - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (4):425.
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  47.  17
    Memoirs of Fellows and Corresponding Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America: Claudio Leonardi.Marcia L. Colish, Richard H. Rouse & William J. Courtenay - 2011 - Speculum 86 (3):865-866.
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  48.  20
    The Pronunciation of θ and δ.R. M. Dawkins & W. H. D. Rouse - 1906 - The Classical Review 20 (09):441-443.
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  49.  22
    The Medieval Circulation of the De chorographia of Pomponius Mela.Catherine M. Gormley, Mary A. Rouse & Richard H. Rouse - 1984 - Mediaeval Studies 46 (1):266-320.
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  50.  20
    Clare College Ms. 26 and the circulation of Aulus Gellius 1-7 in medieval England and France.P. K. Marshall, Janet Martin & Richard H. Rouse - 1980 - Mediaeval Studies 42 (1):353-394.
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