Results for 'Social role'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  74
    Religion: Its Origins, Social Role and Sources of Variation.Richard Startup - 2020 - Open Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):346-367.
    Religion emerged among early humans because both purposive and non-purposive explanations were being employed but understanding was lacking of their precise scope and limits. Given also a context of very limited human power, the resultant foregrounding of agency and purposive explanation expressed itself in religion’s marked tendency towards anthropomorphism and its key role in legitimizing behaviour. The inevitability of death also structures the religious outlook; with ancestors sometimes assigned a role in relation to the living. Subjective elements such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  47
    Social Role Conceptions and CSR Policy Success.Tobias Gössling & Chris Vocht - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):363-372.
    Businesses are eager to present themselves as honest and reliable corporate citizens who care about the overall well-being of society. This article researches whether different role conceptions of businesses regarding social issues are related to their success in dealing with social demands. Do socially active companies have a better social reputation than inactive companies? This relationship is determined by first extracting the social role conceptions of the companies from their Corporate Social Responsibility reports (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  74
    Modeling Role Enactment: Linking Role Theory and Social Cognition.Karen Danna Lynch - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):379–399.
    In our dynamic social world, a premium is placed on the individual's ability to innovate and to change . Yet traditional role theory has difficulty accounting for innovation, leaving unanswered the question of how individual level negotiations affect social-structural processes . This study addresses this tension by linking role theory with social cognition. By positioning behavior and cognition as two interrelated continuums, I stretch the meaning of role enactment to include 4 role typologies. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  39
    How Important Are CEOs to CSR Practices? An Analysis of the Mediating Effect of the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.José-Luis Godos-Díez, Roberto Fernández-Gago & Almudena Martínez-Campillo - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):531-548.
    Drawing on the Agency-Stewardship approach, which suggests that manager profile may range from the agent model to the steward model, this article aims to examine how important CEOs are to corporate social responsibility (CSR). Specifically, this exploratory study proposes the existence of a relationship between manager profile and CSR practices and that this relation is mediated by the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. After applying a mediated regression analysis using survey information collected from 149 CEOs (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  5.  20
    Ethical Decision Making and Leadership: Merging Social Role and Self-Construal Perspectives.Crystal L. Hoyt & Terry L. Price - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):531-539.
    This research extends our understanding of ethical decision making on the part of leaders by merging social role and self-construal perspectives. Interdependent self-construal is generally seen as enhancing concern for justice and moral values. Across two studies, we tested the prediction that non-leading group members’ interdependent self-construal would be associated with lower levels of unethical decision making on behalf of their group but that, in contrast, this relationship would be weaker for leaders, given their social role. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  15
    Some Personal Notes on Role Plays as an Excellent Teaching Tool: Commentary on “Using and Developing Role Plays in Teaching Aimed at Preparing for Social Responsibility”.Iris Hunger - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1529-1531.
    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to “live through” complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students’ work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  17
    Autonomy as a Social Role and the Function of Diversity.Raffaela Giovagnoli - 2018 - Philosophies 3 (3):1-12.
    In the ambit of the debate on “personal autonomy”, we propose to intend “personal autonomy” in a social sense. We undertake this move because we think that autonomy is compatible with socialization and we’ll give reasons for this claim. Moreover, we must consider the role of the wide variety of informational sources we are exposed to, which influence our behavior. Social background represents the ontological ground from which we develop the capacity for autonomy; at the same time, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  14
    Environmental Degradation and the Ambiguous Social Role of Science and Technology.Leo Marx - 1992 - Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):449-468.
    Recent anxieties about the deterioration of the global environment have had the effect of intensifying the ambiguity that surrounds the social roles of scientists and engineers. This has happened not merely, as suggested at the outset, because the environmental crisis has made their roles more conspicuous. Nor is it merely because recent disasters have alerted us to new, or hitherto unrecognized, social consequences of using the latest science-based technologies. What also requires recognition is that ideas about the (...) role of modern science and engineering are embedded in, hence mediated by, larger views of the world. Within such American worldviews, moreover, the status of science and engineering is closely bound up with their perceived effect upon the environment.In the dominant culture, accordingly, the respect given to scientists and engineers is in large measure dependent on their ability to play the central role assigned to them in the historical narrative about progress. As the ostensible heroes of that popular story, they are expected to lead the way in realizing the promise of prosperity and general well-being. The environmental crisis surely has diminished the credibility of that story, thereby causing the social role of science and engineering to seem more dubious — more ambiguous. To be sure, the crisis also may have the effect, for very different reasons, of increasing the power and responsibility of organized science. But the late twentieth-century task of damage control cannot possibly elicit anything like the respect accorded to organized science by the earlier belief in progress.It also is important to recall, finally, that the narrative of progress itself has undergone a disillusioning transformation. The early Enlightenment version of the story depicted scientists and engineers working in the service of a social and political ideal that all people could share. But the later technocratic concept of progress, with its sterile instrumentalist notion of advancing the power of science-based technology as an end in itself, is far less likely to inspire trust. Its patent inadequacies have had the effect of enhancing the appeal, if only by contrast, of the seemingly “anti-science” ideologies of pastoralism and primitivism. All of which might be taken to suggest that if the scientific and engineering professions want to recover some of the respect and status they once had, they would be well advised to join with sympathetic humanists and social scientists in recuperating some of the idealism that the project of modern science formerly derived from its place within the ideology of progress. That might entail the sacrifice of their technocratic posture of neutrality, dissociating themselves from people and institutions responsible for environmental degradation, and their help in formulating a new concept — which is to say, new criteria — of progress to which they might commit themselves. A primary test of any proposed social policy under this new dispensation surely would be whether it would improve, or at a minimum protect, the life-enhancing capacities of the global ecosystem. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A8402064 00011 *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A8402064 00012 *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A8402064 00013. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  23
    The Individual and Society: The Social Role of Shame.Bina Nir - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Criticism 1 (2):36-70.
    The feeling of shame has a longstanding role in the relations between individual and society. In this article we shall distinguish between shame and shaming and try to understand the social and cultural function of shame. Even though shame is a feeling that has a physiological basis, the way in which we experience emotions differs from culture to culture since it is the meaning that we attach to an event that evokes the emotion rather than the event itself. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior.Longinos Marin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65-78.
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  11.  88
    Knowledge Central: A Central Role for Knowledge Attributions in Social Evaluations.John Turri, Ori Friedman & Ashley Keefner - 2017 - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):504-515.
    Five experiments demonstrate the central role of knowledge attributions in social evaluations. In Experiments 1–3, we manipulated whether an agent believes, is certain of, or knows a true proposition and asked people to rate whether the agent should perform a variety of actions. We found that knowledge, more so than belief or certainty, leads people to judge that the agent should act. In Experiments 4–5, we investigated whether attributions of knowledge or certainty can explain an important finding on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  12.  27
    The Role of Social Network Structure in the Emergence of Linguistic Structure.Limor Raviv, Antje Meyer & Shiri Lev‐Ari - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (8).
    Social network structure has been argued to shape the structure of languages, as well as affect the spread of innovations and the formation of conventions in the community. Specifically, theoretical and computational models of language change predict that sparsely connected communities develop more systematic languages, while tightly knit communities can maintain high levels of linguistic complexity and variability. However, the role of social network structure in the cultural evolution of languages has never been tested experimentally. Here, we (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  32
    The Role of Power in Social Explanation.Torsten Menge - 2018 - European Journal of Social Theory 21 (1):22 - 38.
    Power is often taken to be a central concept in social and political thought that can contribute to the explanation of many different social phenomena. This article argues that in order to play this role, a general theory of power is required to identify a stable causal capacity, one that does not depend on idiosyncratic social conditions and can thus exert its characteristic influence in a wide range of cases. It considers three promising strategies for such (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  40
    The Role of Dominance Hierarchy in the Evolution of Social Species.Mahdi Muhammad Moosa & S. M. Minhaz Ud-Dean - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):203-208.
    A number of animal species from different lineages live socially. One of the features of social living is the formation of dominance hierarchy. Despite its obvious benefit in the survival probability of the species, the hierarchical structureitself poses psychological and physiological burden leading to the chronic activation of stress related pathways. Considering these apparently conflicting observations, here we propose that social hierarchy can act as a selective force in the evolution of social species. We also discuss its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Human Values in a Changing World: A Dialogue on the Social Role of Religion.Bryan R. Wilson - 1984 - Lyle Stuart.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  25
    The Role of CEO’s Personal Incentives in Driving Corporate Social Responsibility.Michele Fabrizi, Christine Mallin & Giovanna Michelon - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):311-326.
    In this study, we explore the role of Chief Executive Officers’ incentives, split between monetary and non-monetary, in relation to corporate social responsibility. We base our analysis on a sample of 597 US firms over the period 2005–2009. We find that both monetary and non-monetary incentives have an effect on CSR decisions. Specifically, monetary incentives designed to align the CEO’s and shareholders’ interests have a negative effect on CSR and non-monetary incentives have a positive effect on CSR. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  17. On the Role of Social Interaction in Social Cognition: A Mechanistic Alternative to Enactivism.Mitchell Herschbach - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):467-486.
    Researchers in the enactivist tradition have recently argued that social interaction can constitute social cognition, rather than simply serve as the context for social cognition. They contend that a focus on social interaction corrects the overemphasis on mechanisms inside the individual in the explanation of social cognition. I critically assess enactivism’s claims about the explanatory role of social interaction in social cognition. After sketching the enactivist approach to cognition in general and (...) cognition in particular, I identify problems with an enactivist taxonomy of roles for social interaction in the explanation of social cognition (contextual, enabling, and constitutive). In particular, I show that this enactivist taxonomy does not clearly distinguish between enabling conditions and constitutive elements, which would make them in danger of committing the coupling-constitution fallacy found in some attempts to extend cognition. I explore resources enactivism has to more clearly demarcate constitutive parts of a cognitive system, but identify problems in applying them to some of the main cases of social cognition enactivists characterize as being constituted by social interaction. I offer the mechanistic approach to explanation as an alternative that captures much of what enactivists want to say about the relations between social and individual levels, but views social interactions from the perspective of embedded cognition rather than as being constitutive of social cognition. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  18. Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657-666.
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  19.  43
    Proactive CSR: An Empirical Analysis of the Role of its Economic, Social and Environmental Dimensions on the Association Between Capabilities and Performance. [REVIEW]Nuttaneeya Ann Torugsa, Wayne O’Donohue & Rob Hecker - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):383-402.
    Proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR) involves business practices adopted voluntarily by firms that go beyond regulatory requirements in order to actively support sustainable economic, social and environmental development, and thereby contribute broadly and positively to society. This empirical study examines the role of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of proactive CSR on the association between three specific capabilities—shared vision, stakeholder management and strategic proactivity—and financial performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Using quantitative data collected (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  20.  35
    The Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility: A Study of Marketing Professionals.Scott J. Vitell, Joseph G. P. Paolillo & James L. Thomas - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):63-86.
    This study examined the effect of various antecedent variables on marketers’ perceptions of the role of ethics and socialresponsibility in the overall success of the firm. Variables examined included Hofstede’s cultural dimensions , as well as corporate ethical values and enforcement ofan ethics code. Additionally, individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism were included. Results indicated that most ofthese variables impacted marketers’ perceptions of the importance of ethics and social responsibility, although to varying degrees.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  21.  29
    Analyzing the Role of Social Norms in Tax Compliance Behavior.Donna D. Bobek, Amy M. Hageman & Charles F. Kelliher - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):451-468.
    The purpose of this study is to explore with more rigor and detail the role of social norms in tax compliance. This study draws on Cialdini and Trost’s (The Handbook of Social Psychology: Oxford University Press, Boston, MA, 1998) taxonomy of social norms to investigate with more specificity this potentially decisive (Alm and McKee, Managerial and Decision Economics, 19:259–275, 1998) influence on tax compliance. We test our research hypotheses regarding the direct and indirect influences of (...) norms using a hypothetical compliance scenario with 174 experienced taxpayers as participants. Factor analysis of the social norm questions successfully identified four distinct social norm constructs, in line with Cialdini and Trost (1998). Results of the path analysis show that individuals’ standards for behavior/ethical beliefs (personal norms) as well as the expectations of close others (subjective norms) directly influence tax compliance decisions, whereas general societal expectations (injunctive norms) and other individuals’ actual behavior (descriptive norms) have an indirect influence. This shows that social norms have important direct as well as indirect influences on tax compliance behavior. We also investigate a number of attitudinal variables that may be related to social norms and taxpayer compliance. The results of this study further clarify the important role that social norms have with regard to taxpayers’ compliance behavior. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  22.  63
    Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers' Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures. [REVIEW]Fernanda Duarte - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355 - 368.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) refers to the duty of management to consider and respond to issues beyond the organization's economic and legal requirements in line with social and environmental values. However, 'management' is constituted by real people responsible for routine decisions and formulation and implementation of policies. It can be said therefore that the ethical ideals and beliefs of these individuals - in particular their personal values - play an important role in their decisions. It is contended (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  23.  20
    The Role of Biological and Social Factors in Determining Gender Identity.M. I. Boichenko, Z. V. Shevchenko & V. V. Pituley - 2019 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 15:11-21.
    Purpose. The aim of this article is an analysis of the main versions of the biodeterminist tradition of re­solving the issue of the nature of gender identity, as well as identification of the advantages of the new version of biodeterminism, which involves elements of social constructivism. Theoretical basis. Social norms determine the extent to which a person has the right to independently determine his or her gender identity, and even more so, to change his or her body according (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  51
    The Role of Strategic Conversations with Stakeholders in the Formation of Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy.Morgan P. Miles, Linda S. Munilla & Jenny Darroch - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):195-205.
    This paper explores the role of strategic conversations in corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy formation. The authors suggest that explicitly engaging stakeholders in the CSR strategy-making process, through the mechanism of strategic conversations, will minimize future stakeholder concerns and enhance CSR strategy making. In addition, suggestions for future research are offered to enable a better understanding of effective strategic conversation processes in CSR strategy making and the resulting performance outcomes.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  25. Gender, Age, Research Experience, Leading Role and Academic Productivity of Vietnamese Researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities: Exploring a 2008-2017 Scopus Dataset.Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2017 - European Science Editing 43 (3):51-55.
    Background: Academic productivity has been studied by scholars all round the world for many years. However, in Vietnam, this topic has scarcely been addressed. This research therefore aims at better understanding the correlations between gender, age, research experience, the leading role of corresponding authors, and the total number of their publications in the specific realm of social sciences and humanities. Methods: The study employed a Scopus dataset with publication profiles of 410 Vietnamese researchers between 2008 and 2017. Results: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  45
    The Role of Social Capital in the Success of Fair Trade.Iain A. Davies & Lynette J. Ryals - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):317-338.
    Fair Trade companies have pulled off an astonishing tour de force. Despite their relatively small size and lack of resources, they have managed to achieve considerable commercial success and, in so doing, have put the fair trade issue firmly onto industry agendas. We analyse the critical role played by social capital in this success and demonstrate the importance of values as an exploitable competitive asset. Our research raises some uncomfortable questions about whether fair trade has 'sold out' to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  27. Role of Religions in Imparting Social Justice in Indian Socio-Political Context.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2016 - Milestone Education Review 7 (02).
    Religion is a deriving force for social change in India since ancient times. Although we boast about ancient Indian ideals of social stratification, which made a long lasting discrimination within society, and most of the times we do not do any justice to social-political life of a billion peoples. The study of the relation between religion and politics showed that this relation always made a problematic situation for the indigenous people and always benefitted invaders. The idea of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  21
    Constructive Empiricism and the Role of Social Values in Science.Sherrilyn Roush - 2007 - Vale-Free Science - Ideals and Illusions.
    One of the most common criticisms one hears of the idea of granting a legitimate role for social values in theory choice in science is that it just doesn’t make sense to regard social preferences as relevant to the truth or to the way things are. “What is at issue,” wrote Susan Haack, is “whether it is possible to derive an ‘is’ from an ‘ought.’ ” One can see that this is not possible, she concludes, “as soon (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  8
    On the Role of Social Media in the ‘Responsible’ Food Business: Blogger Buzz on Health and Obesity Issues.Hsin-Hsuan Meg Lee, Willemijn Van Dolen & Ans Kolk - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):695-707.
    To contribute to the debate on the role of social media in responsible business, this article explores blogger buzz in reaction to food companies’ press releases on health and obesity issues, considering the content and the level of fit between the CSR initiatives and the company. Findings show that companies issued more product-related initiatives than promotion-related ones. Among these, less than half generated a substantial number of responses from bloggers, which could not be identified as a specific group. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30.  11
    The Role of Religion in the System of Social and Medical Services in Post-Communism Romania.Daniela Cojocaru, Stefan Cojocaru & Antonio Sandu - 2011 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):65-83.
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} This article aims to examine the phenomenon of social services in post-1989 Romania, underscoring the role of the religious factor in the establishment and operation of nongovernmental organisations active in the area of family and child protection/child welfare. The results are based on empirical data collected from interviews (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  48
    The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development.Mette Ebbesen - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):333-333.
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  32.  44
    Virtue and Role: Reflections on the Social Nature of Morality.Lisa Newton - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (3):357-365.
    Robert Solomon has usefully set forth the outlines of an ontology of ethics for the employee. I seize upon three of the insights in his paper-specifically, relating to employee role, social nature, and virtue-and develop them along Aristotelean lines, showing along the way how classic "dilemmas" of the business ethics literature can be recast as problems of employee character and virtue.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  33.  31
    Accounting for the Benefits of Social Security and the Role of Business: Four Ideal Types and Their Different Heuristics.Rüdiger W. Waldkirch, Matthias Meyer & Karl Homann - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S3):247 - 267.
    Germany is considered to be a pioneer of social security systems; nonetheless, globalization and demographic changes have put enormous pressure on them. A solution is not yet in sight as the debate on the future of the German social security systems still lacks consensus. We argue that ideas matter and that the debate can benefit from a deeper reflection on the concept of social security. This objective is pursued along two lines. First, we take a historical perspective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34.  16
    The Social Role of Understanding in G. K. Chesterton's Detective Fiction.Omer Schwartz - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):54-70.
    G. K. Chesterton's fictional detectives stand in stark methodical contrast to scientific detectives such as Sherlock Holmes. While the scientific detective focuses on external reality, seeking to reconstruct the crime, Chesterton's detectives—and Father Brown in particular—are preoccupied with inner perceptions, devoting their energy to understanding other minds. While Holmes may be seen as a positivist driven by the physical sciences, Chesterton's detectives are exegetes, perceiving human beings as a unique species demanding a distinctive approach. They thus reflect Chesterton's view that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  22
    The Role of Reflection in Addressing the Social Responsibility Mandate of Teacher Education.Thomas Falkenberg - 2013 - Revue Phronesis 2 (1):52-66.
    Abstract : This article makes the case that teacher’s personal qualities should be considered to be of great importance to being a teacher and that pre- and in- service teacher education has a social responsibility mandate. Developing personal qualities in teacher education is an important way in which teacher education can address its social responsibility mandate and, conversely, this mandate can provide the perspective from which the value of teacher’s personal qualities for teaching can be judged. Finally, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  35
    Habits, Self-Control and Social Conventions: The Role of Global Media and Corporations.Sae Won Kim & Chong Ju Choi - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):147-154.
    There has been an intellectual debate at least since the 1960s in business ethics on the role of the media in relation to consumer choice driven by either habits or rationality. If consumers are totally rational, then the global media and global corporations provide just information and knowledge. If consumers are influenced by habit then large corporations and global media can greatly influence consumer choice and create problems of self-control (Ainslie, 1992, Pico Economics: The Strategic Interaction of Successive Motivational (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  31
    Web 2.0 Social Networks: The Role of Trust.Sonja Grabner-Kräuter - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):505 - 522.
    Online social networks (OSNs) have gained enormous popularity in recent years. Hundreds of millions of social network users reveal great amounts of personal information in the Web 2.0 environment that is largely devoid of security standards and practices. The central question in this article is why so many social network users are being so trusting. The focus is on theory-building on trust as a critical issue in OSNs. A theoretical framework is developed, which facilitates a multi-level and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Alienation and Social Role.Maurice Natanson - forthcoming - Social Research.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  10
    Collective Risk Social Dilemma: Role of Information Availability in Achieving Cooperation Against Climate Change.Medha Kumar & Varun Dutt - 2019 - Journal of Dynamic Decision Making 5 (1):2-2.
    Behaviour change via monetary investments is a way to fighting climate change. Prior research has investigated the role of climate-change investments using a Collective-Risk-Social-Dilemma game, where players have to collectively reach a target by contributing to a climate fund; failing which they lose their investments with a probability. However, little is known on how variability in the availability of information about players’ investments influences investment decisions in CRSD. In an experiment involving CRSD, 480 participants were randomly assigned to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  10
    Re-Programming the Mind Through Logic. The Social Role of Logic in Positivism and Lieber’s Mits, Wits and Logic.Rolf George & Nina Gandhi - unknown
    This essay on the social history of logic instruction considers the programmatic writings of Carnap/Neurath, but especially in the widely read book by Lillian Lieber, Mits, Wits and Logic, where Mits is the man in the street and Wits the woman in the street. In the ‘pre-Toulmin’ days it was seriously argued that the intense study of formal logic would create a more rational frame of mind and have many beneficial effects upon the social and political life. It (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  26
    The Concept of Social Role.Eileen M. Loudfoot - 1972 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):133-145.
  42.  22
    The Role of 'High Potentials' in Integrating and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility.Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen, David Harness & Marieke Hoffmann - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):73-91.
    The Samenleving and Bedrijf (S&B) network of Dutch organizations seeks to embed corporate social responsibility (CSR) within business practices but faces challenges with regard to how to do so across various organizational practices, processes, and policies. The integration of CSR demands cultural change driven by senior management and other change agents, who push CSR principles throughout the organization. This study examines the change processes that S&B member organizations have initiated, with a particular focus on the role of high (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  13
    On the Systematic Social Role of Expressed Emotions: An Embodied Perspective.Nicolas Vermeulen - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):405-406.
    Vigil suggests that expressed emotions are inherently learned and triggered in social contexts. A strict reading of this account is not consistent with the findings that individuals, even those who are congenitally blind, do express emotions in the absence of an audience. Rather, grounded cognition suggests that facial expressions might also be an embodied support used to represent emotional information.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. George H. Mead and Luigi Pirandello: Some Parallels Between the Theoretical and Artistic Presentation of the Social Role Concept.Bed̆ich Baumann - forthcoming - Social Research.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Social Role of the Man of Knowledge (1940).«.A. Salomon - forthcoming - Social Research.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  9
    Normative Social Role Concepts in Early Childhood.Emily Foster‐Hanson & Marjorie Rhodes - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  34
    Creatures, Corporations, Communities, Chaos, Complexity A Naturological View of the Corporate Social Role.William C. Frederick - 1998 - Business and Society 37 (4):358-389.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  48.  15
    The Role of Social Eye-Gaze in Children’s and Adults’ Ownership Attributions to Robotic Agents in Three Cultures.Patricia Kanngiesser, Shoji Itakura, Yue Zhou, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Bruce Hood - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (1):1-28.
    Young children often treat robots as social agents after they have witnessed interactions that can be interpreted as social. We studied in three experiments whether four-year-olds from three cultures and adults from two cultures will attribute ownership of objects to a robot that engages in social gaze with a human. Participants watched videos of robot-human interactions, in which objects were possessed or new objects were created. Children and adults applied the same ownership rules to humans and robots (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  14
    Ethnographic Insights Regarding the “Social Role” and “Moral Status” of the Fetus as “Patient”: Comparing Developed (United States & Sweden) and Developing (India) Countries.Catherine Myser - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):50-52.
  50. Stockholder and Stakeholder Interpretations of Business' Social Role.Anthony F. Buono & Lawrence T. Nichols - forthcoming - Business Ethics.
1 — 50 / 1000