Results for 'Sociolinguistics'

444 found
Order:
See also
  1.  32
    Language Misconceived: Arguing for Applied Cognitive Sociolinguistics.Karol Janicki - 2006 - Lawerence Erlbaum.
    Linguistics is important. An understanding of linguistic principles is as essential to the layperson as it is to the language scholar. Using concrete examples from politics, law, and education, this book shows how people misconceive language every day and what the consequences of misconceptions can be. Since the meanings of words are often fuzzy at best, this volume argues for a flexible approach to meaning and definitions, and demonstrates how this approach can help us understand many conflicts. It is an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Semantic Variation: Meaning in Society and in Sociolinguistics.Ruqaiya Hasan - 2009 - Equinox.
  3.  13
    The Rise, Development, and Future Prospects of Sociolinguistics.Chen Yuan - 2004 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 35 (3):38-52.
    Sociolinguistics is a frontier science. From the beginning of this century onward, following an ever-deepening observation and inference in natural sciences and social phenomena, an awareness arose that a single science , cannot explain, let alone analyze in great detail, complex natural and social phenomena. Real life demanded interdisciplinary studies, which gave rise to frontier sciences. Nature and society do not consist of separate and unrelated parts; rather, nature and society are an organic, integrated whole, which cannot be explained (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  5
    Missed Connections at the Junction of Sociolinguistics and Speech Processing.Gerard Docherty, Paul Foulkes, Simon Gonzalez & Nathaniel Mitchell - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (4):759-774.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  4
    Explaining the Word Da : On Dictionary Compilation, Lexicography, and Certain Problems in Sociolinguistics.Chen Yuan - 2004 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 35 (3):18-37.
    In modern Chinese, da is one character, but at the same time, it is also one word.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  4
    Sociolinguistics and Translators' Communicative Competence.Rachel Lung - 1998 - Perspectives 6 (1):35-46.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  57
    From Nativism to Sociolinguistics: Integrating a Theory of Language Growth with a Theory of Speech Practices.Trevor Pateman - 1985 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (1):38–58.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  30
    Kako Bi Trebali Govoriti Hrvatski Magarci? O Sociolingvistici Animiranih Filmova (How Should Croatian Donkeys Speak? Sociolinguistics of Animated Films).Dunja Jutronić - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):287-292.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  22
    Book Reviews : Karol Janicki, Toward Non-Essentialist Sociolinguistics. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 1990. Pp. 136. D.M. 88.00. [REVIEW]P. Beade - 1993 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):548-551.
  10.  13
    English in Language Shift: The History, Structure, and Sociolinguistics of South African Indian English (Review).Timothy C. Frazer - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--3.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  6
    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao.Alvin P. Cohen, Yuen Ren Chao & Anwar S. Dil - 1977 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 97 (3):410.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  9
    Explaining the Word Da : On Dictionary Compilation, Lexicography, and Certain Problems in Sociolinguistics.Chen Yuan - 2004 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 35 (3):18-37.
    In modern Chinese, da is one character, but at the same time, it is also one word.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  2
    Taking Plurality Seriously with Michel De Certeau: From History to ‘Reception Sociolinguistics’.Didier de Robillard - 2017 - In Babette Babich (ed.), Hermeneutic Philosophies of Social Science. De Gruyter. pp. 267-286.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  4
    Cognitive Sociolinguistics Meets Loanword Research: Measuring Variation in the Success of Anglicisms in Dutch.Eline Zenner, Dirk Speelman & Dirk Geeraerts - 2012 - Cognitive Linguistics 23 (4).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    Why Did the Crowd Think St Peter Was Drunk? An Exercise in Applied Sociolinguistics.David Crystal - 1998 - New Blackfriars 79 (924):72-76.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  3
    Sociolinguistics: Some Methodological Contributions From Linguistics.Marshall Durbin & Michael Micklin - 1968 - Foundations of Language 4 (3):319-331.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  2
    The Status of Frequency, Schemas, and Identity in Cognitive Sociolinguistics: A Case Study on Definite Article Reduction.Willem B. Hollmann & Anna Siewierska - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Explaining the Word Da (Big)-On Dictionary Compilation, Lexicography, and Certain Problems in Sociolinguistics.Y. Chen - 2004 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 35 (3):18-37.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Ivo Žanić, Kako Bi Trebali Govoriti Hrvatski Magarci? O Sociolingvistici Animiranih Filmova (How Should Croatian Donkeys Speak? Sociolinguistics of A).Dunja Jutronić - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 30:115-120.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  3
    Concept Characteristics and Variation in Lexical Diversity in Two Dutch Dialect Areas.Karlien Franco, Dirk Geeraerts, Dirk Speelman & Roeland Van Hout - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):205-242.
    Lexical diversity, the amount of lexical variation shown by a particular concept, varies between concepts. For the concept drunk, for instance, nearly 3000 English expressions exist, including blitzed, intoxicated, and hammered. For the concept sober, however, a significantly smaller number of lexical items is available, like sober or abstinent. While earlier variation studies have revealed that meaning-related concept characteristics correlate with the amount of lexical variation, these studies were limited in scope, being restricted to one semantic field and to one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  6
    The Phenomenology of Falling Ill: An Explication, Critique and Improvement of Sartre’s Theory of Embodiment and Alienation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (1):53-66.
    In this paper I develop a phenomenology of falling ill by presenting, interpreting and developing the basic model we find in Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness. The three steps identified by Sartre in this process are analysed, developed further and brought to a five- step model: pre-reflective experience of discomfort, lived, bodily discomfort, suffered illness, disease pondering, and disease state. To fall ill is to fall victim to a gradual process of alienation, and with each step this alienating process is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  22. Book Symposium.D. Lawrence Wieder - 2001 - Philosophical Books 42 (3):161-195.
    Books reviewed:Mark BevirThe Logic of the History of Ideas.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  41
    The Grammar of Meaning: Normativity and Semantic Discourse.Mark Norris Lance - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the function of concepts pertaining to meaning in socio-linguistic practice? In this study, the authors argue that we can approach a satisfactory answer by displacing the standard picture of meaning talk as a sort of description with a picture that takes seriously the similarity between meaning talk and various types of normative injunction. In their discussion of this approach, they investigate the more general question of the nature of the normative, as well as a range of important topics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  24.  20
    On the Pragmatics of Social Interaction: Preliminary Studies in the Theory of Communicative Action.Jürgen Habermas - 2002 - MIT Press.
    Habermas's 1971 Gauss Lectures, plus two additional essays, outlining an intersubjective approach to social theory.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  25.  23
    Lebenswelt Origins of the Sciences: Working Out Durkheim’s Aphorism. [REVIEW]Harold Garfinkel - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (1):9-56.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  26.  84
    What Things Still Don’T Do.David M. Kaplan - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):229-240.
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek’s What Things Do ( 2006 ). The four things that Verbeek does well are: (1) remind us of the importance of technological things; (2) bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; (3) explain how technology “co-shapes” experience by reading Bruno Latour’s actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde’s post-phenomenology; (4) develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: (1) analyze the material conditions in which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27. The Spectacular Showing: Houdini and the Wonder of Ethnomethodology.Eric Laurier - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (4):377-399.
    This essay is about Houdini’s escapes and ethnomethodology’s studies.1 By accomplishing what appears to be impossible, Houdini leaves his audience considering not only how did he manage to do that, but also just what is it that we consider to be possible. Magicians and escapologists warn us off an interest in the mechanics of their tricks that might spoil the thrill of what they dramatically present to us: a sense of the limits to whatwe can apprehend as an audience. While (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Cognitive Theory and Phenomenology in Arendt’s and Nussbaum’s Work on Narrative.Veronica Vasterling - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (2):79-95.
    In this essay I compare Nussbaum's and Arendt's approach to narrativity. The point of the comparison is to find out which approach is more adequate for practical philosophy: the approach influenced by cognitive theory or the one influenced by hermeneutic phenomenology. I conclude that Nussbaum's approach is flawed by methodological solipsism, which is due to her application of cognitive theory.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  5
    Order Without Rules: Critical Theory and the Logic of Conversation.David Bogen - 1999 - State University of New York Press.
    Questions whether the logic of language underlying Habermas's theory of communicative action is in fact the defining feature of conversational practice.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  30.  4
    Priming as a Motivating Factor in Sociophonetic Variation and Change.Lynn Clark - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (4):729-744.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  51
    Alfred Schutz's Influence on American Sociologists and Sociology.George Psathas - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (1):1-35.
    Alfred Schutz''s influence on American sociologists and sociology in the 1960s and 1970s is traced through the examination of the work of two of his students, Helmut Wagner and Peter Berger, and of Harold Garfinkel with whom he met and corresponded over a number of years. The circumstances of Schutz''s own academic situation, particularly the short period of his academic career in the United States and his location at the New School, are examined to consider how and in what ways (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. Existential Social Theory After the Poststructuralist and Communication Turns.Martin Beck Matuštík - 2002 - Human Studies 25 (2):147-164.
    Thomas Flynn's work on Sartre and Foucault, the first of a two-volume project, offers a unique opportunity for examining an existential theory of history. It occasions rethinking existential-social categories from the vantage point of the poststructuralist turn. And it contributes to developing existential variants of critical theory. The following questions guide me in each of the three above areas. First, how is human history intelligible, given not only our finite sense of ourselves but also claims that we have reached the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  20
    A Continuing Dialogue with Alfred Schutz.Hisashi Nasu - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (2):87-105.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34. Pragmatism, Naturalism, and Phenomenology.Scott F. Aikin - 2007 - Human Studies 29 (3):317-340.
    Pragmatism's naturalism is inconsistent with the phenomenological tradition's anti-naturalism. This poses a problem for the methodological consistency of phenomenological work in the pragmatist tradition. Solutions such as phenomenologizing naturalism or naturalizing phenomenology have been proposed, but they fail. As a consequence, pragmatists and other naturalists must answer the phenomenological tradition's criticisms of naturalism.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  55
    Peter-Paul Verbeek: Review of What Things Do. [REVIEW]Andrew Feenberg - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):225-228.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  27
    Kinetic Tactile-Kinesthetic Bodies: Ontogenetical Foundations of Apprenticeship Learning. [REVIEW]Maxine Sheet-Johnstone - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (4):343-370.
    An ontogenetically-informed epistemology is necessary to understandings of apprenticeship learning. The methodology required in this enterprise is a constructive phenomenology, a phenomenology that takes into account the fact that as infants, we were apprentices of our own bodies: we all learned our bodies and learned to move ourselves. The major focus of this essay is on infant social relationships that develop on the ground of our original corporeal-kinetic apprenticeship. It shows how joint attention, imitation, and turn-taking - all richly examined (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  38
    Discourse and Mind.Jeff Coulter - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (2-4):163-181.
    In recent years, various attempts have been made to advance a project sometimes characterized as "discursive psychology". Grounded in what its proponents term "social constructionism", the discursive approach to the elucidation of 'mental' phenomena is here contrasted to an ethnomethodological position informed by the later work of Wittgenstein. In particular, it is argued that discursive psychology still contains Cartesian residua, notwithstanding its professed objective of expurgating Cartesian thought from the behavioral sciences. One principal issue has been the confusion of "conceptual (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  38.  56
    Silence in Context: Ethnomethodology and Social Theory. [REVIEW]Michael Lynch - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (2-4):211-233.
    Ethnomethodologists (or at least many of them) have been reticent about their theoretical sources and methodological principles. It frequently falls to others to make such matters explicit. In this paper I discuss this silence about theory, but rather than entering the breach by specifying a set of implicit assumptions and principles, I suggest that the reticence is consistent with ethnomethodology's distinctive research 'program'. The main part of the paper describes the pedagogical exercises and forms of apprenticeship through which Garfinkel and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39. Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory.Peg O'Connor - 2002 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Combating homophobia, racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination and violence in our society requires more than just focusing on the overt acts of prejudiced and abusive individuals. The very intelligibility of such acts, in fact, depends upon a background of shared beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that together form the context of social practices in which these acts come to have the meaning they do. This book, inspired by Wittgenstein as well as feminist and critical race theory, shines a critical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Ghost Gestures: Phenomenological Investigations of Bodily Micromovements and Their Intercorporeal Implications. [REVIEW]Elizabeth A. Behnke - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (2):181-201.
    This paper thematizes the operative kinaesthetic style of world-experiencing life by turning to the ongoing how of our habitual bodily comportment: to our deeply sedimented way(s) of making a body; to schematic inner vectors or tendencies toward movement that persist as bodily ghost gestures even if one is not making the larger, visible gestures they imply; and to inadvertent isometrics, i.e., persisting patterns of trying, bracing, freezing, etc. All such micromovements witness to our sociality insofar as they are not only (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41.  36
    The Meaning of Appearance in Surviving Breast Cancer.Ozum Ucok - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (3):291-316.
    In line with some recent studies that emphasize the importance of embodied meanings in social interaction and face-to-face communication, this study recognizes the significance of the body in human meaning-making processes and contributes to the emerging studies that explore the relation of the body, self, and social interaction. Unlike studies that analyze the body as a symbol or text disconnected from the actual body (i.e., a representation), this study does not separate appearance from the body. Rather, this research explores embodied (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  29
    Ethics Talk; Talking Ethics: An Example of Clinical Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW]Mark J. Bliton - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (1):7-24.
    This written account of a clinical encounter - depicting fragments of a more extensive array of events - attempts to exemplify many facets and associated complexities of clinical ethics consultation. Within the general telling, I provide more detailed portrayals of several key events. In secion 1, I document briefly my initial interactions at the beginning of the consultation, focusing on the information gained - in the context of those interactions - as I read the medical chart of Mrs. Rose. Next (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  43.  31
    Making Music Together While Growing Older: Further Reflections on Intersubjectivity. [REVIEW]Richard M. Zaner - 2002 - Human Studies 25 (1):1-18.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  44. Pragmatism, Artificial Intelligence, and Posthuman Bioethics: Shusterman, Rorty, Foucault. [REVIEW]Jerold J. Abrams - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (3):241-258.
    Michel Foucault's early works criticize the development of modern democratic institutions as creating a surveillance society, which functions to control bodies by making them feel watched and monitored full time. His later works attempt to recover private space by exploring subversive techniques of the body and language. Following Foucault, pragmatists like Richard Shusterman and Richard Rorty have also developed very rich approaches to this project, extending it deeper into the literary and somatic dimensions of self-stylizing. Yet, for a debate centered (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  45.  60
    The Embodied Chiasmic Relationship of Mother and Infant.Francine Wynn - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (2):253-270.
    In this paper the very earliest relationship of mother and newborn will be described phenomenologically through an interlacing of Donald Winnicott''s work on maternal holding with Maurice Merleau-Ponty''s concepts of flesh and chiasm. Merleau-Ponty''s thinking suggests that the holding relationship described by Winnicott is formed as much by the infant''s holding of the mother as it is by mother''s holding of her infant. Both flex and bend towards each other and inscribe each other yet retain their own particularity. Further specification (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  46.  71
    “Another Insistence of Man”: Prolegomena to the Question of the Animal in Derrida's Reading of Heidegger.Matthew Calarco - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (3):317-334.
    In recent years Derrida has devoted a considerable number of writings to addressing “the question of the animal,” and, more often than not, this question arises in a reading of one of Heidegger's texts. In order to appreciate more fully the stakes of Derrida's posing of this question in relation to Heidegger, in this essay I offer some prefatory remarks to the question of the animal in Derrida's reading of Heidegger. The essay opens with a careful analysis of Derrida's early (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  62
    Phenomenology and the Third Generation of Cognitive Science: Towards a Cognitive Phenomenology of the Body.Shoji Nagataki & Satoru Hirose - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (3):219-232.
    Phenomenology of the body and the third generation of cognitive science, both of which attribute a central role in human cognition to the body rather than to the Cartesian notion of representation, face the criticism that higher-level cognition cannot be fully grasped by those studies. The problem here is how explicit representations, consciousness, and thoughts issue from perception and the body, and how they cooperate in human cognition. In order to address this problem, we propose a research program, a cognitive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  32
    Time, Death, and History in Simmel and Heidegger.John E. Jalbert - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (2):259-283.
  49.  14
    Typification in Society and Social Science: The Continuing Relevance of Schutz’s Social Phenomenology.Kwang-ki Kim & Tim Berard - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (3):263-289.
    This paper examines Alfred Schutz's insights on types and typification. Beginning with a brief overview of the history and meaning of typification in interpretive sociology, the paper further addresses both the ubiquity and the necessity of typification in social life and scientific method. Schutz's contribution itself is lacking in empirical application and grounding, but examples are provided of ongoing empirical research which advances the understanding of types and typification. As is suggested by illustrations from scholarship in the social studies of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  61
    Absolute Difference and Social Ontology: Levinas Face to Face with Buber and Fichte.Simon Lumsden - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):227-241.
    In Totality and Infinity Levinas presents the 'face to face' as an account of intersubjectivity, but one which maintains the absolute difference of the Other. This essay explores the genesis of the 'face to face' through a discussion of Levinas in relation to Buber. It is argued that Levinas' account of subjectivity shares much in common with Fichte's theory of subjectivity. It is further argued that while the 'face to face' clarifies and opposes traditional problems in social ontology, the 'face (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 444