Results for 'Thermodynamics'

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  1.  95
    Relativity, Thermodynamics, and Cosmology.Richard Chace Tolman - 1934 - Clarendon Press.
    A distinguished American physicist and teacher delivers a landmark study thatdevelops three essential scientific themes on each subject.
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  2. Reducing Thermodynamics to Statistical Mechanics: The Case of Entropy.Craig Callender - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy 96 (7):348-373.
  3. Taking Thermodynamics Too Seriously.Craig Callender - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (4):539-553.
    This paper discusses the mistake of understanding the laws and concepts of thermodynamics too literally in the foundations of statistical mechanics. Arguing that this error is still made in subtle ways, the article explores its occurrence in three examples: the Second Law, the concept of equilibrium and the definition of phase transitions.
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  4. Thermodynamic Asymmetry in Time.Craig Callender - 2006 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thermodynamics is the science that describes much of the time asymmetric behavior found in the world. This entry's first task, consequently, is to show how thermodynamics treats temporally ‘directed’ behavior. It then concentrates on the following two questions. (1) What is the origin of the thermodynamic asymmetry in time? In a world possibly governed by time symmetric laws, how should we understand the time asymmetric laws of thermodynamics? (2) Does the thermodynamic time asymmetry explain the other temporal (...)
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  5. Thermodynamics and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat.Nahum Kipnis - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (10):2007-2044.
    This paper is the first part of a three-part project ‘How the principle of energy conservation evolved between 1842 and 1870: the view of a participant’. This paper aims at showing how the new ideas of Mayer and Joule were received, what constituted the new theory in the period under study, and how it was supported experimentally. A connection was found between the new theory and thermodynamics which benefited both of them. Some considerations are offered about the desirability of (...)
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  6. Explaining Thermodynamic-Like Behavior in Terms of Epsilon-Ergodicity.Roman Frigg & Charlotte Werndl - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (4):628-652.
    Gases reach equilibrium when left to themselves. Why do they behave in this way? The canonical answer to this question, originally proffered by Boltzmann, is that the systems have to be ergodic. This answer has been criticised on different grounds and is now widely regarded as flawed. In this paper we argue that some of the main arguments against Boltzmann's answer, in particular, arguments based on the KAM-theorem and the Markus-Meyer theorem, are beside the point. We then argue that something (...)
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  7. Understanding Thermodynamic Singularities: Phase Transitions, Data, and Phenomena.Sorin Bangu - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (4):488-505.
    According to standard (quantum) statistical mechanics, the phenomenon of a phase transition, as described in classical thermodynamics, cannot be derived unless one assumes that the system under study is infinite. This is naturally puzzling since real systems are composed of a finite number of particles; consequently, a well‐known reaction to this problem was to urge that the thermodynamic definition of phase transitions (in terms of singularities) should not be “taken seriously.” This article takes singularities seriously and analyzes their role (...)
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  8.  55
    Thermodynamic Irreversibility: Does the Big Bang Explain What It Purports to Explain?Daniel Parker - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):751-763.
    In this paper I examine Albert’s (2000) claim that the low entropy state of the early universe is sufficient to explain irreversible thermodynamic phenomena. In particular, I argue that conditionalising on the initial state of the universe does not have the explanatory power it is presumed to have. I present several arguments to the effect that Albert’s ‘past hypothesis’ alone cannot justify the belief in past non-equilibrium conditions or ground the veracity of records of the past.
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  9.  42
    Thermodynamics as Control Theory.David Wallace - unknown
    I explore the reduction of thermodynamics to statistical mechanics by treating the former as a control theory: a theory of which transitions between states can be induced on a system by means of operations from a fixed list. I recover the results of standard thermodynamics in this framework on the assumption that the available operations do not include measurements which affect subsequent choices of operations. I then relax this assumption and use the framework to consider the vexed questions (...)
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  10.  13
    Rational Thermodynamics.C. Truesdell - 1986 - Philosophy of Science 53 (2):305-306.
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  11. The Thermodynamic Arrow: Puzzles and Pseudo-Puzzles.Huw Price - unknown
    For more than a century, physics has known of a puzzling conflict between the T- asymmetry of thermodynamic phenomena and the T-symmetry of the underlying microphysics on which these phenomena depend. This paper provides a guide to the current status of this puzzle, distinguishing the central issue from various issues with which it may be confused. It is shown that there are two competing conceptions of what is needed to resolve the puzzle of the thermodynamic asymmetry, which differ with respect (...)
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  12.  13
    Thermodynamic foundations of physical chemistry: reversible processes and thermal equilibrium into the history.Raffaele Pisano, Abdelkader Anakkar, Emilio Marco Pellegrino & Maxime Nagels - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (3):297-323.
    In the history of science, the birth of classical chemistry and thermodynamics produced an anomaly within Newtonian mechanical paradigm: force and acceleration were no longer citizens of new cited sciences. Scholars tried to reintroduce them within mechanistic approaches, as the case of the kinetic gas theory. Nevertheless, Thermodynamics, in general, and its Second Law, in particular, gradually affirmed their role of dominant not-reducible cognitive paradigms for various scientific disciplines: more than twenty formulations of Second Law—a sort of indisputable (...)
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  13.  4
    Relativity, Thermodynamics and Cosmology. By Richard C. Tolman. Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1934. Pp. XV + 502. $8.50.Enos E. Witmer - 1935 - Philosophy of Science 2 (2):262-265.
  14.  21
    ‘Like Thermodynamics Before Boltzmann.’ On the Emergence of Einstein's Distinction Between Constructive and Principle Theories.Marco Giovanelli - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 71:118-157.
  15. Analytical Thermodynamics. Part I. Thermostatics—General Theory.Josef-Maria Jauch - 1975 - Foundations of Physics 5 (1):111-132.
    A new axiomatic treatment of equilibrium thermodynamics—thermostatics—is presented. The equilibrium states of a thermal system are assumed to be represented by a differentiable manifold of dimensionn + 1 (n finite). The empirical temperature is defined by the notion of thermal equilibrium. Empirical entropy is shown to exist for all systems with the property that the total work delivered along closed adiabats is zero. Absolute entropy and temperature follow from the additivity of heat and energy for two separate systems in (...)
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  16. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics: A Maxwellian View.Wayne C. Myrvold - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):237-243.
    One finds, in Maxwell's writings on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a conception of the nature of these subjects that differs in interesting ways from the way that they are usually conceived. In particular, though—in agreement with the currently accepted view—Maxwell maintains that the second law of thermodynamics, as originally conceived, cannot be strictly true, the replacement he proposes is different from the version accepted by most physicists today. The modification of the second law accepted by most physicists is (...)
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  17. Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW]Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  18.  7
    Thermodynamic Foundations of Physical Chemistry: Reversible Processes and Thermal Equilibrium Into the History.Raffaele Pisano, Abdelkader Anakkar, Emilio Marco Pellegrino & Maxime Nagels - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (3):297-323.
    In the history of science, the birth of classical chemistry and thermodynamics produced an anomaly within Newtonian mechanical paradigm: force and acceleration were no longer citizens of new cited sciences. Scholars tried to reintroduce them within mechanistic approaches, as the case of the kinetic gas theory. Nevertheless, Thermodynamics, in general, and its Second Law, in particular, gradually affirmed their role of dominant not-reducible cognitive paradigms for various scientific disciplines: more than twenty formulations of Second Law—a sort of indisputable (...)
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  19.  10
    Relativistic Thermodynamics and the Passage of Time.Friedel Weinert - 2010 - Humana Mente 4 (13):175-191.
    The debate about the passage of time is usually confined to Minkowski‟s geometric interpretation of space-time. It infers the block universe from the notion of relative simultaneity. But there are alternative interpretations of space-time – so-called axiomatic approaches –, based on the existence of „optical facts‟, which have thermodynamic properties. It may therefore be interesting to approach the afore-mentioned debate from the point of view of relativistic thermodynamics, in which invariant parameters exist, which may serve to indicate the passage (...)
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  20. Time in Thermodynamics.Jill North - 2011 - In Criag Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press. pp. 312--350.
    Or better: time asymmetry in thermodynamics. Better still: time asymmetry in thermodynamic phenomena. “Time in thermodynamics” misleadingly suggests that thermodynamics will tell us about the fundamental nature of time. But we don’t think that thermodynamics is a fundamental theory. It is a theory of macroscopic behavior, often called a “phenomenological science.” And to the extent that physics can tell us about the fundamental features of the world, including such things as the nature of time, we generally (...)
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  21. Statistical Thermodynamics for a Non-Commutative Special Relativity: Emergence of a Generalized Quantum Dynamics. [REVIEW]Kinjalk Lochan, Seema Satin & Tejinder P. Singh - 2012 - Foundations of Physics 42 (12):1556-1572.
    There ought to exist a description of quantum field theory which does not depend on an external classical time. To achieve this goal, in a recent paper we have proposed a non-commutative special relativity in which space-time and matter degrees of freedom are treated as classical matrices with arbitrary commutation relations, and a space-time line element is defined using a trace. In the present paper, following the theory of Trace Dynamics, we construct a statistical thermodynamics for the non-commutative special (...)
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  22.  67
    Black Hole Thermodynamics: More Than an Analogy?John Dougherty & Craig Callender - unknown
    Black hole thermodynamics is regarded as one of the deepest clues we have to a quantum theory of gravity. It motivates scores of proposals in the field, from the thought that the world is a hologram to calculations in string theory. The rationale for BHT playing this important role, and for much of BHT itself, originates in the analogy between black hole behavior and ordinary thermodynamic systems. Claiming the relationship is “more than a formal analogy,” black holes are said (...)
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  23. Thermodynamics and Quanta in Planck’s Work.Martin J. Klein - 1966 - Physics Today 19 (11):294--302.
  24. Thermodynamic Uncertainty Relations.Jos Uffink & Janneke van Lith - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (5):655-692.
    Bohr and Heisenberg suggested that the thermodynamical quantities of temperature and energy are complementary in the same way as position and momentum in quantum mechanics. Roughly speaking their idea was that a definite temperature can be attributed to a system only if it is submerged in a heat bath, in which case energy fluctuations are unavoidable. On the other hand, a definite energy can be assigned only to systems in thermal isolation, thus excluding the simultaneous determination of its temperature. Rosenfeld (...)
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  25. Thermodynamics and Some Undecidable Physical Questions.Jerome Rothstein - 1964 - Philosophy of Science 31 (1):40-48.
    It is shown that a number of questions, usually considered philosophical rather than scientific, can be reformulated to apply to a world of automata or "well-informed heat engines." In some cases they admit of physical answers, but in many cases obtaining answers entails violation of the second law of thermodynamics. This is demonstrated explicitly for the problem of determinism and free will, for the discovery of the origin or ultimate fate of the universe, or for the discovery of causes (...)
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  26. Statistical Thermodynamics.R. H. Fowler & E. A. Guggenheim - 1941 - Philosophy of Science 8 (1):134-135.
  27. The Thermodynamical Arrow of Time: Reinterpreting the Boltzmann–Schuetz Argument. [REVIEW]Milan M. Ćirković - 2002 - Foundations of Physics 33 (3):467-490.
    The recent surge of interest in the origin of the temporal asymmetry of thermodynamical systems (including the accessible part of the universe itself) has put forward two possible explanatory approaches to this age-old problem. Hereby we show that there is a third possible alternative, based on the generalization of the classical (“Boltzmann–Schuetz”) anthropic fluctuation picture of the origin of the perceived entropy gradient. This alternative (which we dub the Acausal-Anthropic approach) is based on accepting Boltzmann's statistical measure at its face (...)
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  28.  40
    Axiomatic Thermodynamics and Extensive Measurement.Fred S. Roberts & R. Duncan Luce - 1968 - Synthese 18 (4):311 - 326.
  29.  31
    Thermodynamics of Flow and Biological Organization.A. Katchalsky - 1971 - Zygon 6 (2):99-125.
  30.  91
    Information Processing and Thermodynamic Entropy.Owen Maroney - unknown
    Are principles of information processing necessary to demonstrate the consistency of statistical mechanics? Does the physical implementation of a computational operation have a fundamental thermodynamic cost, purely by virtue of its logical properties? These two questions lie at the centre of a large body of literature concerned with the Szilard engine (a variant of the Maxwell's demon thought experiment), Landauer's principle (supposed to embody the fundamental principle of the thermodynamics of computation) and possible connections between the two. A variety (...)
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  31.  68
    Thermodynamics of Self-Gravitating Systems.Joseph Katz - 2003 - Foundations of Physics 33 (2):223-269.
    This work assembles some basic theoretical elements on thermal equilibrium, stability conditions, and fluctuation theory in self-gravitating systems illustrated with a few examples. Thermodynamics deals with states that have settled down after sufficient time has gone by. Time dependent phenomena are beyond the scope of this paper. While thermodynamics is firmly rooted in statistical physics, equilibrium configurations, stability criteria and the destabilizing effect of fluctuations are all expressed in terms of thermodynamic functions. The work is not a review (...)
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  32.  31
    Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics and Different Axioms of Evolution.Daniel R. Brooks & Richard T. O'Grady - 1986 - Acta Biotheoretica 35 (1-2):77-106.
    Proponents of two axioms of biological evolutionary theory have attempted to find justification by reference to nonequilibrium thermodynamics. One states that biological systems and their evolutionary diversification are physically improbable states and transitions, resulting from a selective process; the other asserts that there is an historically constrained inherent directionality in evolutionary dynamics, independent of natural selection, which exerts a self-organizing influence. The first, the Axiom of Improbability, is shown to be nonhistorical and thus, for a theory of change through (...)
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  33. Relativistic Thermodynamics: Its History and Foundations.Chuang Liu - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Relativistic Thermodynamics of equilibrium processes has remained a strange chapter in the history of modern physics. It was established by Planck in 1908 as a simple application of Einstein's special theory of relativity. Einstein himself made substantial contributions and its final product remained officially unchallenged until 1965. In 1952, however, at the end of his career, Einstein challenged the theory in his correspondence with von Laue. Many of his unpublished suggestions anticipated the major works in the debate of the (...)
     
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  34.  22
    The Thermodynamics of Life: Robert Levin, Simon Laughlin, Christina de la Rocha and Alan Blackwell : Work Meets Life: Exploring the Integrative Study of Work in Living Systems. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press, 2011, 272pp, $30.00, £20.95 HB.J. Scott Turner - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):371-373.
    The thermodynamics of life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9651-8 Authors J. Scott Turner, SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  35.  20
    Thermodynamically Reversible Processes in Statistical Physics.John D. Norton - unknown
    Equilibrium states are used as limit states to define thermodynamically reversible processes. When these processes are implemented in statistical physics, these limit states become unstable and can change with time, due to thermal fluctuations. For macroscopic systems, the changes are insignificant on ordinary time scales and what little there is can be suppressed by macroscopically negligible, entropy-creating dissipation. For systems of molecular sizes, the changes are large on short time scales and can only sometimes be suppressed with significant entropy-creating dissipation. (...)
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  36.  15
    A Thermodynamic Approach to Grain Growth and Coarsening.J. Svoboda & P. Fratzl - 2003 - Philosophical Magazine 83 (9):1075-1093.
  37.  89
    Quantum Thermodynamics of Nonequilibrium. Onsager Reciprocity and Dispersion-Dissipation Relations.Gian Paolo Beretta - 1987 - Foundations of Physics 17 (4):365-381.
    A generalized Onsager reciprocity theorem emerges as an exact consequence of the structure of the nonlinear equation of motion of quantum thermodynamics and is valid for all the dissipative nonequilibrium states, close and far from stable thermodynamic equilibrium, of an isolated system composed of a single constituent of matter with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. In addition, a dispersion-dissipation theorem results in a precise relation between the generalized dissipative conductivity that describes the mutual interrelation between dissipative rates of a pair (...)
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  38. Fried Eggs, Thermodynamics, and the Special Sciences.Jeffrey Dunn - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):71-98.
    David Lewis ([1986b]) gives an attractive and familiar account of counterfactual dependence in the standard context. This account has recently been subject to a counterexample from Adam Elga ([2000]). In this article, I formulate a Lewisian response to Elga’s counterexample. The strategy is to add an extra criterion to Lewis’s similarity metric, which determines the comparative similarity of worlds. This extra criterion instructs us to take special science laws into consideration as well as fundamental laws. I argue that the Second (...)
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  39.  6
    Thermodynamic Theory for Simple and Complex Dissipative Structures.Pallavi Rastogi & Shripad P. Mahulikar - 2021 - Foundations of Physics 51 (3):1-19.
    Dissipative structures exist at all scales, systems, and at different levels of complexity. A thermodynamic theory integrating simple and complex DS is introduced, which addresses existence of growing/decaying DS based on their entropy analysis. Two entropy-based dimensionless ratios are introduced, which explain negentropy-debt payment and existence of DS with growth or decay. It is shown that excess negentropy debt payment is needed and beneficial for growing DS; but for decaying DS, it hastens its approach to perish and is counter-productive. Growing (...)
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  40.  94
    Thermodynamics of Nonlinear, Interacting Irreversible Processes. II.B. H. Lavenda - 1973 - Foundations of Physics 3 (1):53-88.
    The scope of the thermodynamic theory of nonlinear irreversible processes is widened to include the nonlinear stability analysis of system motion. The emphasis is shifted from the analysis of instantaneous energy flows to that of the average work performed by periodic nonlinear processes. The principle of virtual work separates dissipative and conservative forces. The vanishing of the work of conservative forces determines the natural period of oscillation. Stability is then determined by the variations of the dissipative forces with amplitude of (...)
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  41.  8
    Thermodynamics of Action and Organization in a System.Atanu Chatterjee - 2016 - Complexity 21 (S1):307-317.
  42. Black Hole Thermodynamics and Lorentz Symmetry.Ted Jacobson & Aron C. Wall - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1076-1080.
    Recent developments point to a breakdown in the generalized second law of thermodynamics for theories with Lorentz symmetry violation. It appears possible to construct a perpetual motion machine of the second kind in such theories, using a black hole to catalyze the conversion of heat to work. Here we describe and extend the arguments leading to that conclusion. We suggest the inference that local Lorentz symmetry may be an emergent property of the macroscopic world with origins in a microscopic (...)
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  43.  50
    Thermodynamics, Statistical Mechanics and the Complexity of Reductions.Lawrence Sklar - 1974 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:15 - 32.
  44.  97
    The Thermodynamic Cost of Fast Thought.Alexandre de Castro - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):473-487.
  45.  22
    The Impossible Process: Thermodynamic Reversibility.John D. Norton - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 55:43-61.
    Standard descriptions of thermodynamically reversible processes attribute contradictory properties to them: they are in equilibrium yet still change their state. Or they are comprised of non-equilibrium states that are so close to equilibrium that the difference does not matter. One cannot have states that both change and no not change at the same time. In place of this internally contradictory characterization, the term “thermodynamically reversible process” is here construed as a label for a set of real processes of change involving (...)
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  46. Thermodynamics and Chemistry: How Does a Theory Formulated Without Reference to Matter Explain the Properties of Matter?G. K. Vemulapalli - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):911-920.
    Varieties of chemical and phase equilibria are controlled by the minimum Gibbs energy principle, according to which the Gibbs energy for a system will have the minimum value at any given temperature and pressure. It is understood that the minimum is with respect to all nonequilibrium states at the same temperature and pressure. The abstract relation between Gibbs energy and the equilibrium constant is deduced from fundamental laws of thermodynamics. However, actual use of this relation calls for the Gibbs (...)
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  47. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics and Evolution: A Philosophical Perspective.David J. Depew - 1986 - Philosophica 37 (19860):27-58.
     
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  48.  47
    Thermodynamic Study of Motor Behaviour Optimization.Patrick Cordier, Michel Mendès France, Philippe Bolon & Jean Pailhous - 1994 - Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3):187-201.
    Our work is aimed at studying the optimization of a complex motor behaviour from a global perspective. First, free climbing as a sport will be briefly introduced while emphasizing in particular its psychomotor aspect called route finding. The basic question raised here is how does the optimization of a sensorimotoricity-environment system take place. The material under study is the free climber's trajectory, viewed as the signature of climbing behaviour (i.e., the spatial dimension). The concepts of learning, optimization, constraint, and degrees (...)
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  49. Thermodynamics in Wilhelm Ostwald’s Physical Chemistry.Robert J. Deltete - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):888-899.
    This essay focuses on the place of the second law of thermodynamics in Wilhelm Ostwald's physical chemistry. After a brief introduction to his energetic theory, which was supposed to be a generalization of thermodynamics, I contrast Ostwald's understanding of the second law, which ignored entropy and irreversibility, with Max Planck's, which emphasized both. I then consider how Ostwald sought to develop physical chemistry without any concern for irreversibility and little concern for entropy, and I argue that he was (...)
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  50. The Reduction(?) Of Thermodynamics to Statistical Mechanics.Lawrence Sklar - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 95 (1-2):187 - 202.
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