Results for 'User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  49
    The Role of Cognitive Modeling for User Interface Design Representations: An Epistemological Analysis of Knowledge Engineering in the Context of Human-Computer Interaction[REVIEW]Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  52
    Human Values and the Design of Computer Technology, Edited by Batya Friedman.John M. Artz - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):305-306.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  69
    Computer Systems and Responsibility: A Normative Look at Technological Complexity.Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):99-107.
    In this paper, we focus attention on the role of computer system complexity in ascribing responsibility. We begin by introducing the notion of technological moral action (TMA). TMA is carried out by the combination of a computer system user, a system designer (developers, programmers, and testers), and a computer system (hardware and software). We discuss three sometimes overlapping types of responsibility: causal responsibility, moral responsibility, and role responsibility. Our analysis is informed by the well-known accounts provided (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4. Interaction and Resistance: The Recognition of Intentions in New Human-Computer Interaction.Vincent C. Müller - 2011 - In Anna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Raffaele Martone, Vincent C. Müller & Gaetano Scarpetta (eds.), Towards autonomous, adaptive, and context-aware multimodal interfaces: Theoretical and practical issues. Springer. pp. 1-7.
    Just as AI has moved away from classical AI, human-computer interaction (HCI) must move away from what I call ‘good old fashioned HCI’ to ‘new HCI’ – it must become a part of cognitive systems research where HCI is one case of the interaction of intelligent agents (we now know that interaction is essential for intelligent agents anyway). For such interaction, we cannot just ‘analyze the data’, but we must assume intentions in the other, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Information Ethics: On the Philosophical Foundation of Computer Ethics. [REVIEW]Luciano Floridi - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):33-52.
    The essential difficulty about Computer Ethics' (CE) philosophical status is a methodological problem: standard ethical theories cannot easily be adapted to deal with CE-problems, which appear to strain their conceptual resources, and CE requires a conceptual foundation as an ethical theory. Information Ethics (IE), the philosophical foundational counterpart of CE, can be seen as a particular case of environmental ethics or ethics of the infosphere. What is good for an information entity and the infosphere in general? This is the (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   47 citations  
  6.  31
    The Sorcerer and the Apprentice. Human-Computer Interaction Today.W. Oberschelp - 1998 - AI and Society 12 (1-2):97-104.
    Human-computer interaction today has got a touch of magic: Without understanding the causal coherence, using a computer seems to become the art to use the right spell with the mouse as the magic wand — the sorcerer's staff. Goethes's poem admits an allegoric interpretation. We explicate the analogy between using a computer and casting a spell with emphasis on teaching magic skills. The art to create an ergonomic user interface has to take care of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Method in Computer Ethics: Towards a Multi-Level Interdisciplinary Approach. [REVIEW]Philip Brey - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):125-129.
    This essay considers methodological aspects ofcomputer ethics and argues for a multi-levelinterdisciplinary approach with a central role forwhat is called disclosive computer ethics. Disclosivecomputer ethics is concerned with the moraldeciphering of embedded values and norms in computersystems, applications and practices. In themethodology for computer ethics research proposed inthe essay, research takes place at three levels: thedisclosure level, in which ideally philosophers,computer scientists and social scientists collaborateto disclose embedded normativity in computer systemsand practices, the theoretical level, in (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  8.  86
    Situating Workplace Surveillance: Ethics and Computer Based Performance Monitoring. [REVIEW]Kirstie S. Ball - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):209-221.
    This paper examines the study of computer basedperformance monitoring (CBPM) in the workplaceas an issue dominated by questions of ethics.Its central contention paper is that anyinvestigation of ethical monitoring practice isinadequate if it simply applies best practiceguidelines to any one context to indicate,whether practice is, on balance, ethical or not. The broader social dynamics of access toprocedural and distributive justice examinedthrough a fine grained approach to the study ofworkplace social relations, and workplaceidentity construction, are also important here. This has (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  35
    The Relationship Between the Uniqueness of Computer Ethics and its Independence as a Discipline in Applied Ethics.Kenneth Einar Himma - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):225-237.
    A number of different uniquenessclaims have been made about computer ethics inorder to justify characterizing it as adistinct subdiscipline of applied ethics. Iconsider several different interpretations ofthese claims and argue, first, that none areplausible and, second, that none provideadequate justification for characterizingcomputer ethics as a distinct subdiscipline ofapplied ethics. Even so, I argue that computerethics shares certain important characteristicswith medical ethics that justifies treatingboth as separate subdisciplines of appliedethics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  26
    Bernard Gert's Morality and its Application to Computer Ethics.Triplett Timm - 2002 - Ethics and Information Technology 4 (1):79-92.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  3
    Bibliometric Mapping of Computer and Information Ethics.Richard Heersmink, Jeroen den Hoven, Nees Eck & Jan den Berg - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):241-249.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  20
    Morality and Machines: Perspectives on Computer Ethics. Stacey L. Edgar.Shade Leslie Regan - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):71-73.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  82
    Introduction to Computer Ethics: Philosophy Enquiry. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):1-2.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  25
    Computer Ethics: Its Birth and its Future.Terrell Ward Bynum - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):109-112.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  31
    Giannis Stamatellos: Computer Ethics—A Global Perspective. [REVIEW]Mark H. Rosenbaum - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):371-373.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  31
    Computer Ethics in the Post-September 11 World.Herman T. Tavani, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Richard A. Spinello - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):181-182.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  31
    Computers in Control: Rational Transfer of Authority or Irresponsible Abdication of Autonomy? [REVIEW]Arthur Kuflik - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):173-184.
    To what extent should humans transfer, or abdicate, responsibility to computers? In this paper, I distinguish six different senses of responsible and then consider in which of these senses computers can, and in which they cannot, be said to be responsible for deciding various outcomes. I sort out and explore two different kinds of complaint against putting computers in greater control of our lives: (i) as finite and fallible human beings, there is a limit to how far we can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  18.  16
    From Participatory Design to Participating Problem Solving: Enhancing System Adaptability Through User Modelling. [REVIEW]Zhengxin Chen - 1993 - AI and Society 7 (3):238-247.
    The issue on the role of users in knowledge-based systems can be investigated from two aspects: the design aspect and the functionality aspect. Participatory design is an important approach for the first aspect while system adaptability supported by user modelling is crucial to the second aspect. In the article, we discuss the second aspect. We view a knowledge-based computer system as the partner of users' problem-solving process, and we argue that the system functionality can be enhanced by adapting (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Unreal Friends.Dean Cocking & Steve Matthews - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):223-231.
    It has become quite common for people to develop `personal'' relationships nowadays, exclusively via extensive correspondence across the Net. Friendships, even romantic love relationships, are apparently, flourishing. But what kind of relations really are possible in this way? In this paper, we focus on the case of close friendship. There are various important markers that identify a relationship as one of close friendship. One will have, for instance, strong affection for the other, a disposition to act for their well-being and (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  20. The Ethics of Representation and Action in Virtual Reality.Brey Philip - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):5-14.
    This essay addresses ethical aspects of the design and use of virtual reality (VR) systems, focusing on the behavioral options made available in such systems and the manner in which reality is represented or simulated in them. An assessment is made of the morality of immoral behavior in virtual reality, and of the virtual modeling of such behavior. Thereafter, the ethical aspects of misrepresentation and biased representation in VR applications are discussed.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  21. Is It Wrong to Play Violent Video Games?McCormick Matt - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):277–287.
    Many people have a strong intuition that there is something morally objectionable about playing violent video games, particularly with increases in the number of people who are playing them and the games' alleged contribution to some highly publicized crimes. In this paper,I use the framework of utilitarian, deontological, and virtue ethical theories to analyze the possibility that there might be some philosophical foundation for these intuitions. I raise the broader question of whether or not participating in authentic simulations of immoral (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  22. Just Consequentialism and Computing.James H. Moor - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  23. Why We Need Better Ethics for Emerging Technologies.James H. Moor - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):111-119.
  24. Informational Privacy, Data Mining, and the Internet.Herman T. Tavani - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):137-145.
    Privacy concerns involving data mining are examined in terms of four questions: What exactly is data mining? How does data mining raise concerns for personal privacy? How do privacy concerns raised by data mining differ from those concerns introduced by traditional information-retrieval techniques in computer databases? How do privacy concerns raised by mining personal data from the Internet differ from those concerns introduced by mining such data from data warehouses? It is argued that the practice of using data-mining techniques, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  25. From Agency to Apperception: Through Kinaesthesia to Cognition and Creation.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (4):255-264.
    My aim in this paper is to go some way towards showing that the maintenance of hard and fast dichotomies, like those between mind and body, and the real and the virtual, is untenable, and that technological advance cannot occur with being cognisant of its reciprocal ethical implications. In their place I will present a softer enactivist ontology through which I examine the nature of our engagement with technology in general and with virtual realities in particular. This softer ontology is (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  31
    Using Genetic Information While Protecting the Privacy of the Soul.James H. Moor - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):257-263.
    Computing plays an important role in genetics (and vice versa).Theoretically, computing provides a conceptual model for thefunction and malfunction of our genetic machinery. Practically,contemporary computers and robots equipped with advancedalgorithms make the revelation of the complete human genomeimminent – computers are about to reveal our genetic soulsfor the first time. Ethically, computers help protect privacyby restricting access in sophisticated ways to genetic information.But the inexorable fact that computers will increasingly collect,analyze, and disseminate abundant amounts of genetic informationmade available through (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  27.  14
    Post-September 11: Computers, Ethics and War.Richard T. De George - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):183-190.
    This paper considers the moralresponsibility of computer scientists withrespect to weapons development in post-911America. It does so by looking at the doctrineof jus in bello as exemplified in fourscenarios. It argues that the traditionaldoctrine should be augmented by a number ofprinciples, including the Principle of aMorally Obligatory Smart Arms Race, thePrinciple of Assistance to One's Enemies, thePrinciple of Public Debate on Weapons of MassDisruption, and the Principle of the MoralUnjustifiability of Private Wars.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  28.  17
    Emergent Values for Automatons: Ethical Problems of Life in the Generalized Internet. [REVIEW]Eric Steinhart - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):155-160.
    The infrastructure is becoming a network of computerized machines regulated by societies of self-directing software agents. Complexity encourages the emergence of novel values in software agent societies. Interdependent human and software political orders cohabitate and coevolve in a symbiosis of freedoms.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  62
    Information Ethics: A Reappraisal. [REVIEW]Luciano Floridi - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):189-204.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  30.  13
    On-Line Professionals.S. Matthews - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (2):61-71.
    Psychotherapy and counselling services are now available on-line, and expanding rapidly. Yet there appears almost no ethical analysis of this on-line mode of delivery of such professional services. In this paper I present such an analysis by considering the limitations on-line contact imposes on the nature of the professional–client relationship. The analysis proceeds via the contrast between the face-to-face case and the on-line case. At the core of the problem must be the recognition that on-line interaction imposes a physical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  9
    How Hiring: Dogs and Humans Need Not Apply. [REVIEW]Richard G. Epstein - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):227-236.
    This is a review of Hans Moravec''s book, Robot: Mere Machine to Transcendent Mind. This review raises three categories of questions relating to Moravec''s vision of the future. First, there are the ethical and social implications issues implicit in robotics research. Second, there are the soul issues, which especially relate to the prospect of the demoralization of human beings. Third, there is the issue as to whether a robot could ever be a sentient being.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  63
    Cyborg Morals, Cyborg Values, Cyborg Ethics.Kevin Warwick - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):131-137.
    The era of the Cyborg is now upon us. This has enormous implications on ethical values for both humans and cyborgs. In this paper the state of play is discussed. Routes to cyborgisation are introduced and different types of Cyborg are considered. The author's own self-experimentation projects are described as central to the theme taken. The presentation involves ethical aspects of cyborgisation both as it stands now and those which need to be investigated in the near future as the effects (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  33.  7
    Transitions in HumanComputer Interaction: From Data Embodiment to Experience Capitalism.Tony D. Sampson - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    This article develops a critical theory of humancomputer interaction intended to test some of the assumptions and omissions made in the field as it transitions from a cognitive theoretical frame to a phenomenological understanding of user experience described by Harrison et al. as a third research paradigm and similarly Bødker :24–31; Bødker, Interactions 22):24–31, 2015) as third-wave HCI. Although this particular focus on experience has provided some novel avenues of academic enquiry, this article draws attention to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  21
    The Case for E-Trust.Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (1):1-3.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  35.  96
    Anonymity.Kathleen A. Wallace - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):21-31.
    Anonymity is a form of nonidentifiability which I define as noncoordinatability of traits in a given respect. This definition broadens the concept, freeing it from its primary association with naming. I analyze different ways anonymity can be realized. I also discuss some ethical issues, such as privacy, accountability and other values which anonymity may serve or undermine. My theory can also conceptualize anonymity in information systems where, for example, privacy and accountability are at issue.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  36.  27
    A Different Way of Seeing: Albert Borgmann's Philosophy of Technology and HumanComputer Interaction[REVIEW]Daniel Fallman - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):53-60.
    Traditional humancomputer interaction (HCI) allowed researchers and practitioners to share and rely on the ‘five E’s’ of usability, the principle that interactive systems should be designed to be effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. A recent trend in HCI, however, is that academic researchers as well as practitioners are becoming increasingly interested in user experiences, i.e., understanding and designing for relationships between users and artifacts that are for instance affective, engaging, fun, playable, sociable, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  58
    The Internet and Japanese Conception of Privacy.Masahiko Mizutani, James Dorsey & James H. Moor - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):121-128.
  38. Can Information Warfare Ever Be Just?John Arquilla - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):203-212.
    The information revolution has fostered the rise of new ways of waging war, generally by means of cyberspace-based attacks on the infrastructures upon which modern societies increasingly depend. This new way of war is primarily disruptive, rather than destructive; and its low barriers to entry make it possible for individuals and groups (not just nation-states) easily to acquire very serious war-making capabilities. The less lethal appearance of information warfare and the possibility of cloaking the attacker''s true identity put serious pressure (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  39.  71
    “Lost in translation”?: Intercultural dialogues on privacy and information ethics (introduction to special issue on privacy and data privacy protection in asia). [REVIEW]Charles Ess - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (1):1-6.
  40.  43
    Reliability of Information on the Internet: Some Distinctions.Anton Vedder & Robert Wachbroit - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):211-215.
    In this contribution, we identify and clarifysome distinctions we believe are useful inestablishing the reliability of information onthe Internet. We begin by examining some of thesalient features of information that go intothe determination of reliability. In so doing,we argue that we need to distinguish contentand pedigree criteria of reliability and thatwe need to separate issues of reliability ofinformation from the issues of theaccessibility and the usability of information.We then turn to an analysis of some commonfailures to recognize reliability orunreliability.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41.  47
    The Illegal Body: `Eurodac' and the Politics of Biometric Identification. [REVIEW]Irma van der Ploeg - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):295-302.
    Biometrics is often described as `the next big thingin information technology'. Rather than IT renderingthe body irrelevant to identity – a mistaken idea tobegin with – the coupling of biometrics with ITunequivocally puts the body center stage. The questions to be raised about biometrics is howbodies will become related to identity, and what thenormative and political ramifications of this couplingwill be. Unlike the body rendered knowable in thebiomedical sciences, biometrics generates a readable body: it transforms the body's surfaces andcharacteristics into (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  42.  37
    Murky Conceptual Waters: The Public and the Private. [REVIEW]Gary T. Marx - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):157-169.
    In discussions on the ethics of surveillanceand consequently surveillance policy, thepublic/private distinction is often implicitlyor explicitly invoked as a way to structure thediscussion and the arguments. In thesediscussions, the distinction public and private is often treated as a uni-dimensional,rigidly dichotomous and absolute, fixed anduniversal concept, whose meaning could bedetermined by the objective content of thebehavior. Nevertheless, if we take a closerlook at the distinction in diverse empiricalcontexts we find them to be more subtle,diffused and ambiguous than suggested. Thus,the paper argues (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  43.  52
    Common Morality and Computing.Bernard Gert - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):53-60.
    This article shows how common morality can be helpful in clarifying the discussion of ethical issues that arise in computing. Since common morality does not always provide unique answers to moral questions, not all such issues can be resolved, however common morality does provide a clear answer to the question whether one can illegally copy software for a friend.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  44.  47
    KDD, Data Mining, and the Challenge for Normative Privacy.Herman T. Tavani - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):265-273.
    The present study examines certain challenges that KDD (Knowledge Discovery in Databases) in general and data mining in particular pose for normative privacy and public policy. In an earlier work (see Tavani, 1999), I argued that certain applications of data-mining technology involving the manipulation of personal data raise special privacy concerns. Whereas the main purpose of the earlier essay was to show what those specific privacy concerns are and to describe how exactly those concerns have been introduced by the use (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45. Editorial.Deborah G. Johnson - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):373-375.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents.Frances Grodzinsky, Keith Miller & Marty Wolf - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):115-121.
  47.  34
    Information Ethics: Agents, Artefacts and New Cultural Perspectives. [REVIEW]Luciano Floridi & Julian Savulescu - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):155-156.
  48.  29
    The Structure of Rights in Directive 95/46/EC on the Protection of Individuals with Regard to the Processing of Personal Data and the Free Movement of Such Data. [REVIEW]Dag Elgesem - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):283-293.
    The paper has three parts. First, a survey and analysis is given ofthe structure of individual rights in the recent EU Directive ondata protection. It is argued that at the core of this structure isan unexplicated notion of what the data subject can `reasonablyexpect' concerning the further processing of information about himor herself. In the second part of the paper it is argued thattheories of privacy popular among philosophers are not able to shed much light on the issues treated in (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49. An Overview of Information Ethics Issues in a World-Wide Context.Elizabeth A. Buchanan - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):193-201.
    This article presents an overview of significant issues facing contemporary information professionals. As the world of information continues to grow at unprecedented speed and in unprecedented volume, questions must be faced by information professionals. Will we participate in the worldwide mythology of equal access for all, or will we truly work towards this debatable goal? Will we accept the narrowing of choice for our corresponding increasing diverse clientele? Such questions must be considered in a holistic context and an understanding of (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50.  54
    Cookies, Web Bugs, Webcams and Cue Cats: Patterns of Surveillance on the World Wide Web. [REVIEW]Colin J. Bennett - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):195-208.
    This article addresses the question of whetherpersonal surveillance on the world wide web isdifferent in nature and intensity from that inthe offline world. The article presents aprofile of the ways in which privacy problemswere framed and addressed in the 1970s and1990s. Based on an analysis of privacy newsstories from 1999–2000, it then presents atypology of the kinds of surveillance practicesthat have emerged as a result of Internetcommunications. Five practices are discussedand illustrated: surveillance by glitch,surveillance by default, surveillance bydesign, surveillance by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000