Results for 'Wharton, Edith'

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  1.  25
    Sympathy, Disability, and the Nurse: Female Power in Edith Wharton’s The Fruit of the Tree. [REVIEW]Rebecca Garden - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (3):223-242.
    The nursing profession’s emphasis on empathy as essential to nursing care may undermine nurses’ power as a collective and detract from perceptions of nurses’ analytical skills and expertise. The practice of empathy may also obscure and even compound patients’ suffering when it does not fully account for their subjectivity. This essay examines the relation of empathy to women’s agency and explores the role empathy plays in obscuring rather than empowering the suffering other, particularly people who are disabled, through a close (...)
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  2. Wharton, Edith-Strategies of Expatriation.Sp Castillo - 1995 - History of European Ideas 20 (1-3):607-613.
     
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  3. The New Edith Wharton Studies : Volume 1.Jennifer Haytock & Laura Rattray (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    The New Edith Wharton Studies uncovers new evidence and presents new ideas that invite us to reconsider our understanding of one of America's most highly acclaimed, versatile, and prolific writers. The volume addresses themes that have previously been missed or underdeveloped, and examines areas where previous scholarship does not take account of key, contemporary issues: Wharton and ecocriticism, Wharton and queer studies, Wharton and animal studies, Wharton and whiteness, and Wharton and contemporary psychology. Essays explore Wharton's treatment of the (...)
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  4. The New Edith Wharton Studies.Jennifer Haytock & Laura Rattray (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    The New Edith Wharton Studies uncovers new evidence and presents new ideas that invite us to reconsider our understanding of one of America's most highly acclaimed, versatile, and prolific writers. The volume addresses themes that have previously been missed or underdeveloped, and examines areas where previous scholarship does not take account of key, contemporary issues: Wharton and ecocriticism, Wharton and queer studies, Wharton and animal studies, Wharton and whiteness, and Wharton and contemporary psychology. Essays explore Wharton's treatment of the (...)
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  5.  39
    Edith Wharton.Joseph E. O’Neill - 1954 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 29 (3):442-443.
  6.  27
    Edith Wharton's The Custom of the Country: A Reassessment. Edited by Laura Rattray.Madeline C. Smith - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (1):118-120.
  7.  11
    Becoming American: Evolution and Performance in Edith Wharton's" The Custom of the Country".John Bruni - 2005 - Intertexts 9 (1):43-61.
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  8.  8
    Edith Wharton: Strategies of Expatriation.Susan Perez Castillo - 1995 - History of European Ideas 20 (1-3):607-613.
  9. Edith Wharton, High Priestess of Reason.James W. Tuttleton - 1966 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):382.
     
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  10.  9
    How Literature Delivers Knowledge and Understanding, Illustrated by Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Wharton’s Summer.Rik Peels - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (2):199-222.
    Some philosophers, like Alex Rosenberg, claim that natural science delivers epistemic values such as knowledge and understanding, whereas, say, literature and, according to some, literary studies, merely have aesthetic value. Many of those working in the field of literary studies oppose this idea. But it is not clear exactly how works of literary art embody knowledge and understanding and how literary studies can bring these to the light. After all, literary works of art are pieces of fiction, which suggests that (...)
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  11.  29
    Jeanne d'Arc by Lucien Fabre.Mary Edith - 1951 - Franciscan Studies 11 (1):104-107.
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  12.  8
    Functional Connectivity in Post-Stroke Aphasia: Innovative Tools at the Service of Evidence-Based Practice.Durand Edith - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  13. Edith Stein and the Problem of Empathy: Locating Ascription and a Structural Relation to Picture Consciousness.Peter Shum - 2012 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 43 (2):178-194.
    The domain of phenomenological investigation delineated by the Husserlian term authentic empathy presents us with an immediate tension. On the one hand, authentic empathy is supposed to grant the subject access (in some sense that remains to be fully specified) to the Other’s experience. On the other hand, foundational phenomenological considerations pertaining to the apprehension of a foreign subjectivity determine that it is precisely a disjunction in subjective processes that is constitutive of the Other being other. In my approach to (...)
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  14.  40
    On Being a ‘We’: Edith Stein’s Contribution to the Intentionalism Debate.Timothy Burns - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):529-547.
    It is commonplace to speak of social groups as if they were capable of the same sorts of activities as individuals. We say, “Germany won the World Cup”; “The United States invaded Iraq”; and “The world mourned the passing of Nelson Mandela”. In so doing, we attribute agency, belief, and emotional states to groups themselves. In recent years, much literature devoted to analyzing such statements and their implications has emerged. Within this literature, the issue of “intentionalism,” whether individuals must have (...)
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  15.  5
    Edith Stein’s Conception of Human Unity and Bodily Formation: A Thomistically Informed Understanding.Robert McNamara - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (4):639-663.
    The problem of human unity lies at the heart of Edith Stein’s investigation of the structure of human nature in her mature works. By examining her resolution of this problem in Der Aufbau der menschlichen Person and Endliches und ewiges Sein, I show how Stein incorporates two foundational teachings of Thomistic anthropology, namely, the substantial unity of the human being and the soul as form of the body, while reinterpreting the meaning of these teachings through performing a fresh phenomenological (...)
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  16.  1
    A formação humana na Educação Superior: abordagem onto-antropológica e teológica de Edith Stein.Clélia Peretti & Vera Fátima Dullius - 2020 - Horizonte - Revista de Estudos de Teologia E Ciências da Religião 18 (55):149-149.
    The article reflects on the current context of Higher Education and its challenges in the formation of new teaching profiles. Here, we chose to phenomenologically inquire about teachers’ education in a confessional institution in order to perceive, in the pulse of the experiences of undergraduate students, the place human and conscience formation occupies in academic trajectory. Following this lead and dialoguing with professionals and students, we realized the need for a deeper understanding of education anthropological-philosophical assumptions. Based on that and (...)
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  17. Being Unfolded: Edith Stein on the Meaning of Being by Thomas Gricoski. [REVIEW]Robert McNamara - forthcoming - ID: International Dialogue, A Multidisciplinary Journal of World Affairs.
    Being Unfolded: Edith Stein on the Meaning of Being, Thomas Gricoski (Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2020), pp. xxi + 268, $75.00.
     
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  18.  4
    The Concept of Christian Philosophy in Edith Stein.Robert McNamara - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):323-346.
    In her mature thought, Edith Stein presents a philosophy that is positively Christian and specifically Catholic. The rationale behind her presentation rests upon three interplaying factors: the nature of philosophy; the nature and state of finite creatures in relation to God; and the meaning of being a Christian. Stein maintains that given the essential imperfection and natural limitation of philosophy as a human science, philosophy lies interiorly open for its elevation and completion through its supplementation by the supernatural contents (...)
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  19.  31
    The Conventional and the Queer: Lily Bart, An Unlivable Ideal.Johanna M. Wagner - 2016 - Substance 45 (1):116-139.
    In criticism of Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, more attention has been paid in recent years to the unconventional side of Lily Bart. Wai-Chee Dimock, for example, calls Lily “something of a rebel”, while Benjamin D. Carson and Elaine Showalter place her as “intruder” and “outsider” in her society, respectively. Ruth Bernard Yeazell admits at least “the faltering pulse of resistance” in Lily, and Maureen Howard describes her as “just unconventional enough”. Lily as a conformist is an obvious (...)
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  20.  8
    Transforming the Self Amidst the Challenges of Chance: William James on "Our Undisciplinables".Colin Koopman - 2016 - Diacritics 44 (4):40-65.
    William James’s moral and political thought was remarkably well adapted to its historical context, in particular to the emergence in the late nineteenth century of a generalized culture of uncertainty, contingency, and probability that called into question traditional conceptions of sovereign selfhood and autonomous freedom. Facing the solidification of numerous apparatus of chance, James developed a strenuous ethics rooted in a conception of freedom as self-transformation. That this ethics was attuned to the pressing problematics of his day is shown by (...)
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  21. Machine and Metaphor: The Ethics of Language in American Realism.Jennifer C. Cook - 2006 - Routledge.
    American literary realism burgeoned during a period of tremendous technological innovation. Because the realists evinced not only a fascination with this new technology but also an ethos that seems to align itself with science, many have paired the two fields rather unproblematically. But this book demonstrates that many realist writers, from Mark Twain to Stephen Crane, Charles W. Chesnutt to Edith Wharton, felt a great deal of anxiety about the advent of new technologies – precisely at the crucial intersection (...)
     
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  22. Seers and Judges: American Literature as Political Philosophy.Ann Davis, Thomas S. Engeman, Lilly J. Goren, Despina Korovessis, Peter Augustine Lawler, Carol McNamara, Mary P. Nichols & Laura Weiner - 2001 - Lexington Books.
    Alexis de Tocqueville asserted that America had no truly great literature, and that American writers merely mimicked the British and European traditions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This new edited collection masterfully refutes Tocqueville's monocultural myopia and reveals the distinctive role American poetry and prose have played in reflecting and passing judgment upon the core values of American democracy. The essays, profiling the work of Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Updike, Edith Wharton, Walt Whitman, Henry James, Willa (...)
     
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  23. Seers and Judges: American Literature as Political Philosophy.Christine Dunn Henderson (ed.) - 2001 - Lexington Books.
    Alexis de Tocqueville asserted that America had no truly great literature, and that American writers merely mimicked the British and European traditions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This new edited collection masterfully refutes Tocqueville's monocultural myopia and reveals the distinctive role American poetry and prose have played in reflecting and passing judgment upon the core values of American democracy. The essays, profiling the work of Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Updike, Edith Wharton, Walt Whitman, Henry James, Willa (...)
     
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  24. Edith Stein’s Engagement with the Thought of Thomas Aquinas in Her Mature Philosophy of the Human Person.Robert McNamara - 2019 - Dissertation, Liverpool Hope University
    This thesis is an investigation of Edith Stein’s later philosophical works with respect to the question of the human person to reveal in what way she engages with the thought of Thomas Aquinas while continuing to practice philosophy according to the phenomenological method of investigation. The investigation is focused primarily upon the confluence of understanding found in two of Stein’s later works, Endliches und ewiges Sein and Der Aufbau der menschlichen Person, with supplementary reference also made to Potenz und (...)
     
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  25. The Cognition of the Human Individual in the Mature Thought of Edith Stein.Robert McNamara - 2018 - Philosophical News 1 (16):131-43.
    Throughout her entire philosophical corpus Edith Stein shows a concerted effort to reach a comprehensive understanding of the human being as individual. In this paper, I examine the question of how knowledge of the being-individual and qualitative individuality of the human being is attained, as it is found presented by Stein in her most mature philosophical work, Endliches und ewiges Sein. After briefly considering Stein’s understanding of consciousness and intentionality, I detail Stein’s own investigation of the manner the human (...)
     
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  26. Darwinism as Religion: What Literature Tells Us About Evolution.Michael Ruse - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The Darwinian Revolution--the change in thinking sparked by Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, which argued that all organisms including humans are the end product of a long, slow, natural process of evolution rather than the miraculous creation of an all-powerful God--is one of the truly momentous cultural events in Western Civilization. Darwinism as Religion is an innovative and exciting approach to this revolution through creative writing, showing how the theory of evolution as expressed by Darwin has, from the (...)
     
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  27. Natural Right and Political Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Catherine Zuckert and Michael Zuckert.Ann Ward & Lee Ward (eds.) - 2013 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Inspired by the work of prominent University of Notre Dame political philosophers Catherine Zuckert and Michael Zuckert, this volume of essays explores the concept of natural right in the history of political philosophy. The central organizing principle of the collection is the examination of the idea of natural justice, identified in the classical period with natural right and in modernity with the concept of individual natural rights. Contributors examine the concept of natural right and rights in all the manifold and (...)
     
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  28. Little Gods: Claiming Worlds in Postmodern Literature, Film, and Online Gaming.G. Christopher Williams - 2002 - Dissertation, Northern Illinois University
    This dissertation is an effort to describe the effects of Postmodern thought in a variety of narrative forms, including novels, film, and computer games. Using Brian McHale's description of the focal point of Modernist narratives as being epistemological and Postmodernist narratives as being concerned primarily with ontological issues, I trace the possible meaning of the changing understanding of these concepts in the twentieth century. In addition, I interrogate the ramifications of the Postmodern resolution to the crisis of epistemology presented through (...)
     
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  29. Edith Stein: On the Problem of Empathy.Kris McDaniel - forthcoming - In Eric Schliesser (ed.), Ten Neglected Philosophical Classics. Oxford University Press.
    I will discuss Stein’s first major philosophical work, On the Problem of Empathy. I’ll first present some of the background context to the composition of this work and then discuss some of the themes of the work that I find intriguing.
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  30. The Curious Case of Collective Experience: Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Communal Experience and a Spanish Fire-Walking Ritual.Burns Timothy - 2016 - The Humanistic Psychologist 44 (4):366-380.
    In everyday language, we readily attribute experiences to groups. For example, 1 might say, “Spain celebrated winning the European Cup” or “The uncovering of corruption caused the union to think long and hard about its internal structure.” In each case, the attribution makes sense. However, it is quite difficult to give a nonreductive account of precisely what these statements mean because in each case a mental state is ascribed to a group, and it is not obvious that groups can have (...)
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  31.  52
    Closeness and Distance in the Nurse-Patient Relation. The Relevance of Edith Stein's Concept of Empathy.Sylvia M. Maatta - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):3-10.
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  32.  29
    A Place for the Role of Community in the Structure of the State: Edith Stein and Edmund Husserl.Antonio Calcagno - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (4):403-416.
    This essay argues that Stein’s view of the state can overcome Husserl’s skepticism about the state being an authentic, intense community rooted in solidarity while not negating his hope for the advent of a genuinely ethical, rational culture. Whereas Husserl places rationality and freedom within the framework of culture proper and not in the state, Stein sees the state as an extension of persons that can give the state its own free, deliberating and rational Ich kann.
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  33.  70
    Edith Stein and the Contemporary Psychological Study of Empathy.Michael Larkin & Rita W. Meneses - 2012 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 43 (2):151-184.
    Illuminated by the writings of Edith Stein, this paper presents a model of empathy as a very particular intersubjective understanding. This is commonly a view absent from psychology literature. For Stein, empathy is the experience of experientially and directly knowing another person’s experience, as it unfolds in the present, together with the awareness of the ‘otherness’ of that experience. It can be conceptually distinguished, in terms of process and experience, from current models that propose that empathic understandings are ‘intellectual’ (...)
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  34.  26
    Acts of the State and Representation in Edith Stein.Hamid Taieb - 2020 - Journal of Social Ontology 6 (1):21-45.
    This paper discusses the thesis defended by Edith Stein that certain acts can be attributed to the State. According to Stein, the State is a social structure characterized by sovereignty. As such, it is responsible for the production, interpretation, and application of law. These tasks require the performance of acts, most of which are what Stein calls “social acts” like enactments and orders. For Stein, the acts in question are made by the organs of the State, but in the (...)
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  35. Edith Stein and the Problem of Empathy: Locating Ascription and a Structural Relation to Picture Consciousness.Peter Shum - 2012 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 43 (2):178-194.
    The domain of phenomenological investigation delineated by the Husserlian term authentic empathy presents us with an immediate tension. On the one hand, authentic empathy is supposed to grant the subject access (in some sense that remains to be fully specified) to the Other’s experience. On the other hand, foundational phenomenological considerations pertaining to the apprehension of a foreign subjectivity determine that it is precisely a disjunction in subjective processes that is constitutive of the Other being other. In my approach to (...)
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  36.  38
    Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Sensual and Emotional Empathy.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):741-760.
    This paper presents and explicates the theory of empathy found in Edith Stein’s early philosophy, notably in the book On the Problem of Empathy, published in 1917, but also by proceeding from complementary thoughts on bodily intentionality and intersubjectivity found in Philosophy of Psychology and the Humanities published in 1922. In these works Stein puts forward an innovative and detailed theory of empathy, which is developed in the framework of a philosophical anthropology involving questions of psychophysical causality, social ontology (...)
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  37.  31
    Edith Stein’s Account of Communal Mind and its Limits: A Phenomenological Reading.Emanuele Caminada - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):549-566.
    Edith Stein claims that communal experiences are not reducible to the collection of individual experiences directed to the same object or upon the same content. Based on this intuition she gives a phenomenological description of the intentional structure that is proper to communal experiences regarding to their content, mode, and subject. While expanding on her attempts to reassess Husserl’s description of intentionality in an original social-ontological framework, I will stress her precious distinction between individual consciousness and communal stream of (...)
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  38.  22
    Edith Stein’s Phenomenology of Sensual and Emotional Empathy.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    This paper presents and explicates the theory of empathy found in Edith Stein’s early philosophy, notably in the book On the Problem of Empathy, published in 1917, but also by proceeding from complementary thoughts on bodily intentionality and intersubjectivity found in Philosophy of Psychology and the Humanities published in 1922. In these works Stein puts forward an innovative and detailed theory of empathy, which is developed in the framework of a philosophical anthropology involving questions of psychophysical causality, social ontology (...)
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  39.  13
    Phenomenological Distinctions Between Empathy De Vivo and Empathy in Fiction: From Contemporary Direct Perception Theory Back to Edith Stein’s Eidetics of Empathy.Francesca De Vecchi & Francesca Forlè - 2020 - Topoi 39 (4):761-770.
    This paper deals with phenomenological distinctions concerning empathy with real persons and empathy with fictional characters. We will introduce both contemporary accounts of our perception of others and Edith Stein’s account of empathy. These theories will turn out to be fruitful in defending our main thesis, i.e. that the differences between empathy with real people and empathy with fictional characters are not structural but just qualitative. We will argue that in both cases empathy is a direct act of perceiving (...)
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  40.  32
    Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue, 1913-1922.Alasdair MacIntyre - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Edith Stein lived an unconventional life. Born into a devout Jewish family, she drifted into atheism in her mid teens, took up the study of philosophy, studied with Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology, became a pioneer in the women's movement in Germany, a military nurse in World War I, converted from atheism to Catholic Christianity, became a Carmelite nun, was murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1942, and canonized by Pope John Paul II.
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  41.  45
    Edith Stein’s Social Ontology of the State, the Law and Social Acts: An Eidetic Approach.Francesca De Vecchi - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:303-330.
    In her Investigation Concerning the State, Edith Stein takes up some of the main ideas of the social ontology presented by Adolf Reinach, and develops a social ontology of the state, of the law and of social acts. I argue that Stein’s social ontology is an eidetics of the state, the law and social acts. Stein identifies the essential relations that constitute the state, the law and social acts, i.e. pinpoints the parts upon which the state, the law and (...)
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  42.  23
    On the Vulnerability of a Community: Edith Stein and Gerda Walther.Antonio Calcagno - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):255-266.
    Edith Stein and Gerda Walther explain how community comes to be and how it is structured, but they do not develop significant accounts of how communities disintegrate or die, albeit they make passing allusions to how this may happen. I argue that what makes communities vulnerable to their possible demise, following both Stein’s and Walther’s social ontology, is the breakdown of the sense of the communal bond, that is, the failure of the community members’ ability to make sense of (...)
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  43.  8
    La alegría como signo de la nupcialidad en tensión escatológica: Christophe Lebreton - Edith Stein.Cecilia Avenatti de Palumbo & Alejandro Bertolini - 2015 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 32 (32):37-56.
    Nuestra hipótesis consiste en considerar la alegría como fruto del dinamismo interpersonal entre Dios y el hombre bajo la figura de la nupcialidad, cuyas notas de reciprocidad, exclusividad, intimidad y fecundidad especifican esta dimensión particular de vida teologal. Al desplegarse en la historia, la nupcialidad adquiere una tensión escatológica pues el diálogo amante de libertades intensifica la presencia recíproca de Dios y el hombre hasta desembocar en una radicalidad que puede conducir al martirio. Tales fueron los casos de dos místicos (...)
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  44.  6
    Edith Landmann-Kalischer on Aesthetic Demarcation and Normativity.Samantha Matherne - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (3):315-334.
    Two perennial questions in aesthetics, among others, are the demarcation question, viz., what, if anything, distinguishes the aesthetic domain from the cognitive or moral domains, and the normative question, viz., what kind of normativity, if any, does the aesthetic domain involve. Although recent attempts to answer these questions can be found in contemporary literature, in this paper I examine the answers defended by the early phenomenologist Edith Landmann-Kalischer. I show that Landmann-Kalischer answers the demarcation question by blending together a (...)
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  45. Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers.Dermot Moran - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein, and also consider the influence of the existentialist Karl Jaspers, who (...)
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  46. Essence in Edith Stein‘s Festschrift Dialogue.Robert McNamara - 2016 - In Andreas Speer & Stephan Regh (eds.), Alles Wesentliche lässt sich nicht schreiben. Freiburg, Germany: pp. 175-94.
    This paper reviews the concept of ‘essence’ in Edmund Husserl and Thomas Aquinas as found presented by Edith Stein in her Festschrift article, ‘Husserl’s Phenomenology and the Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas: Attempt at a Comparison,’ in the Jahrbuch für Philosophie und Phänomenologische Forschung (1929, 370). The aim of the paper is to perform an analysis of Stein’s understanding of the principal similarities and differences in the understandings of essence found in the writings of Husserl and Aquinas, and primarily (...)
     
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  47.  65
    Edith Stein’s Philosophy of Community in Her Early Work and in Her Later Finite and Eternal Being: Martin Heidegger’s Impact.Antonio Calcagno - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (2):231-255.
    Edith Stein’s early phenomenological texts describe community as a special unity that is fully lived through in consciousness. In her later works, unity is described in more theological terms as participation in the communal fullness and wholeness of God or Being. Can these two accounts of community or human belonging be reconciled? I argue that consciousness can bring to the fore the meaning of community, thereby conditioning our lived-experience of community, but it can also, through Heideggerian questioning, uncover that (...)
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  48.  50
    Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein: The Question of the Human Subject.Angela Ales Bello - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):143-159.
    The goal of this article is to analyze the way in which Edith Stein describes the human subject throughout her research, including her phenomenological phaseand the period of her Christian philosophy. In order to do this, I trace essential moments in Husserl’s philosophy, showing both Stein’s reliance upon Husserl andher originality. Both thinkers believe that an analysis of the human being can be carried out by examining consciousness and its lived experiences. Through suchan examination Stein arrives at the same (...)
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  49.  12
    Edith Stein and the Ethics of Renewal.William E. Tullius - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):675-700.
    While Edith Stein never developed an ethics of her own, her work is nonetheless suggestive of an “ethics of renewal,” which appears in nuce in various moments of her corpus. First, in her phenomenological treatises, Stein analyzes the ethical development of personality in the unfolding of the personal “core” as responding to ever higher value domains. During the 1930s, this becomes a project of living out a moral vocation bestowed by God. In Endliches und ewiges Sein, the moral life (...)
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  50.  96
    "Dar-forma" all'umano: dimensione antropologica, etica ed educativa della bildung in Edith Stein // "Shaping" the human: anthropological, ethical and educational bildung in Edith Stein.Calogero Caltagirone - 2013 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 18 (3):15-23.
    Il presente lavoro intende cogliere l’originalità e la fecondità della prospettiva di Edith Stein sul fondamento antropologico ed etico dell’educativo. Mediante l’analisi del radicamento antropologico della dimensione formativa, che si fonda sulla la struttura antropologica della persona umana, si pone l’obiettivo di offrire i fondamenti antropologici ed etici alla relazione educativa, concentrandosi sul senso dell’educazione intesa come formazione ( Bildung ) integrale dell’uomo.
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