Results for 'Women scientists'

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  1.  14
    Examining the Cognitive Processes Used by Adolescent Girls and Women Scientists in Identifying Science Role Models: A Feminist Approach.Gayle A. Buck, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Diandra Leslie‐Pelecky, Yun Lu & Particia Cerda‐Lizarraga - 2008 - Science Education 92 (4):688-707.
  2.  8
    The Archives of Women in Science and Engineering and Future Directions for Oral History: Questions for Women Scientists.Tanya Zanish-Belcher - 2012 - Centaurus 54 (4):292-298.
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  3.  39
    Feminist Epistemology and Women Scientists.Alan Soble - 1983 - Metaphilosophy 14 (3-4):291-307.
  4.  6
    The More You Look, the More You Find: Archives of Recent American Women Scientists.Margaret W. Rossiter - 2012 - Centaurus 54 (4):288-291.
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  5.  5
    An Uneven Introduction to Many Forgotten Women Scientists, Studded with Many Interesting Facts.Naomi Pasachoff - 2019 - Metascience 28 (1):105-110.
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  6.  16
    Pamela Proffitt . Notable Women Scientists. Xxvi + 668 Pp., Illus., Index. Framington Hills: Gale Group, 1999. $90.Catharine M. C. Haines . International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Xix + 383 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Santa Barbara: ABC‐CLIO, 2001.Linda Zierdt‐Warshaw;, Alan Winkler;, Leonard Bernstein . American Women in Technology: An Encyclopedia. Xviii + 384 Pp., Illus., Tables, Apps., Bibl., Index. Santa Barbara: ABC‐CLIO, 2000. $75. [REVIEW]Marilyn Ogilvie - 2003 - Isis 94 (1):205-207.
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  7.  10
    Margaret W. Rossiter. Women Scientists in America. Volume 3: Forging a New World Since 1972. Xx + 426 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. $45. [REVIEW]Ellen S. More - 2012 - Isis 103 (4):808-810.
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  8.  8
    Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action, 1940-1972. Margaret W. Rossiter.Barbara A. Kimmelman - 1996 - Isis 87 (3):574-576.
  9.  8
    Jordynn Jack. Science on the Home Front: American Women Scientists in World War II. X + 165 Pp., Bibl., Index. Urbana/Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2009. $20. [REVIEW]Margaret W. Rossiter - 2010 - Isis 101 (4):898-900.
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  10.  8
    Black Women Scientists in the United States. Wini Warren.Karen Patricia Williams - 2001 - Isis 92 (3):631-632.
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  11.  2
    Women Scientists in America: Forging a New World Since 1972 - by Margaret W. Rossiter.Maria Rentetzi - 2015 - Centaurus 57 (1):33-35.
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  12.  7
    Kathleen Broome Williams. Improbable Warriors: Women Scientists and the U.S. Navy in World War II. Xvii + 304 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 2001. $34.95. [REVIEW]Peggy Aldrich Kidwell - 2002 - Isis 93 (3):516-516.
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  13.  7
    Magdolna Hargittai. Women Scientists: Reflections, Challenges, and Breaking Boundaries. Xiii + 363 Pp., Figs., Index. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. £20.49 .Paola Govoni; Zelda Alice Franceschi . Writing About Lives in Science: Biography, Gender, and Genre. 287 Pp. Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2014. €44.99. [REVIEW]Renate Tobies - 2016 - Isis 107 (2):382-383.
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  14.  17
    Review of Emily Monosson, Ed., Motherhood, The Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out. [REVIEW]Sarah Rodriguez - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):28-29.
  15.  2
    Women Scientists From Antiquity to the Present: An Index. Caroline L. HerzenbergWomen in Science, Antiquity Through the Nineteenth Century: A Biographical Dictionary with Annotated Bibliography. Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie. [REVIEW]Ann Hibner Koblitz - 1987 - Isis 78 (2):315-316.
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  16.  1
    The Fungus Fighters: Two Women Scientists and Their Discovery. Richard S. Baldwin.Donald J. McGraw - 1983 - Isis 74 (1):116-117.
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  17. Book Notices-Twentieth-Century Women Scientists.Lisa Yount - 1998 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):377-377.
     
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  18.  5
    Girls of Today and Women From the Past: When the History of Female Scientists is Used to Engage Girls with Science.Sandra Benitez Herrera & Patrícia Figueiró Spinelli - 2019 - Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science 6:35.
    “Girls in the Museum” is a project aimed at school students to encourage them to explore scientific careers and engage with science. To achieve its goals, the project uses a variety of methodologies during the training sessions, always emphasizing the contributions of women to science and society throughout history. In one activity, the participants had to select 14 scientists and philosophers and compile their contributions in a talk that they presented in various Museum events. 1,5 years after the (...)
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  19.  9
    Women as Scientists: Their Rights and Obligations. [REVIEW]Rose Sheinin - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):131 - 155.
    Science and engineering remain male-dominated professions in Canada and elsewhere. This is a disheartening fact for a society dedicated to providing equality of education and opportunity, and protection of the right to physical and psychological security of the person to all its citizens. Canadian women comprise 51% of the population, yet still hold down, on average, less than 10% of all jobs in the basic and applied sciences. Few women are found in the upper strata of the science (...)
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  20.  1
    Innovative Niche Scientists: Women's Role in Reframing North American Museums, 1880-1930.Sally Gregory Kohlstedt - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (2):153-174.
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  21.  22
    Hestian Thinking in Antiquity and Modernity: Pythagorean Women Philosophers and 19th Century Domestic Scientists.Patricia J. Thompson - 2000 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (2/3):71-82.
    Thompson proposed a re-visioning of the oikos/polis dichotomy in classical philosophy. She offers a dual systems paradigm based on two ancient Greek mythemes---Hestia, goddess of the oikos, or domestic “homeplace,” and Hermes, god of the polis, or public “marketplace,” as an alternative to gender as the primary analytic lens to advance feminist theory. This paper applies hestian/hermean lenses of analysis, described in two propadeutic papers, to the writings of 6th-5th century BCEPythagorean women philosophers and 19th century domestic scientists (...)
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  22. From Scarcity to Visibility Gender Differences in the Careers of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers.J. Scott Long - 2001
  23. Women and Logic: What Can Women’s Studies Contribute to the History of Formal Logic?Andrea Reichenberger & Karin Beiküfner - 2019 - Transversal. International Journal for the Historiography of Science 6:6-14.
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  24. Women in Western Political Philosophy: Kant to Nietzsche.Ellen Kennedy & Susan Mendus (eds.) - 1987 - St. Martin's Press.
  25.  28
    Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women[REVIEW]Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite (...)
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  26.  38
    Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson.Nancy G. Slack - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. (...)
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  27.  26
    "The Real Point Is Control": The Reception of Barbara McClintock's Controlling Elements. [REVIEW]Nathaniel C. Comfort - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):133 - 162.
    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic (...)
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  28.  81
    Mission Completed? Changing Visibility of Women’s Colleges in England and Japan and Their Roles in Promoting Gender Equality in Science.Naonori Kodate, Kashiko Kodate & Takako Kodate - 2010 - Minerva 48 (3):309-330.
    The global community, from UNESCO to NGOs, is committed to promoting the status of women in science, engineering and technology, despite long-held prejudices and the lack of role models. Previously, when equality was not firmly established as a key issue on international or national agendas, women’s colleges played a great role in mentoring female scientists. However, now that a concerted effort has been made by governments, the academic community and the private sector to give women equal (...)
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  29. Mill, Political Economy, and Women's Work.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2008 - American Political Science Review 102 (2):199-203.
    The sexual division of labor and the social and economic value of women’s work in the home has been a problem that scholars have struggled with at least since the advent of the “second wave” women’s movement, but it has never entered into the primary discourses of political science. This paper argues that John Stuart Mill’s Political Economy provides innovative and useful arguments that address this thorny problem. Productive labor is essential to Mill’s conception of property, and property (...)
     
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  30.  24
    Ethos and Symbolic Violence Among Women of Science: An Empirical Study.Andrea Cerroni & Zenia Simonella - 2012 - Social Science Information 51 (2):165-182.
    While scientific challenges raise relevant debates about the ethics of science, the scientific ethos, shattered by post-Mertonian studies, has received neither due attention nor further conceptualizations in view of the transition to knowledge society. On the contrary, in our investigation of Italian women scientists, it appears to have survived as a reference for scientists, even if the context has changed. Indeed, the ethos of scientists is no longer conceivable as exclusive, but is instead seen as open (...)
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  31.  27
    Overcoming Isolation: Women's Dilemmas in American Academic Science. [REVIEW]Carol Kemelgor & Henry Etzkowitz - 2001 - Minerva 39 (2):153-174.
    Science is an intensely social activity. Professional relationships are essential forscientific success and mentors areindispensable for professional growth. Despitethe scientific ethos of universalism andinclusion, American women scientists frequentlyexperience isolation and exclusion at some timeduring their academic career. By contrast,male scientists enjoy informal but crucialsocial networks. Female scientists developnecessary strategies and defences, but manyleave or achieve less success in science whendeprived of necessary interpersonalconnections. There is indication that changewithin departments is occurring, but this isdependent upon institutional leadership.
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  32.  12
    The Marine Biological Laboratory and the Scientific Advancement of Women in the Early 20th Century: The Example of Mary Jane Hogue.Ernst-August Seyfarth & Steven Zottoli - 2015 - Journal of the History of Biology 48 (1):137-167.
    The Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA provided opportunities for women to conduct research in the late 19th and early 20th century at a time when many barriers existed to their pursuit of a scientific career. One woman who benefited from the welcoming environment at the MBL was Mary Jane Hogue. Her remarkable career as an experimental biologist spanned over 55 years. Hogue was born into a Quaker family in 1883 and received her undergraduate degree from Goucher College. (...)
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  33. El Sexo de la Ciencia.Pacheco Ladrón de Guevara & C. Lourdes - 2010 - Juan Pablos Editor.
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  34.  36
    Revisiting Current Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Science.Carole J. Lee - forthcoming - In Jennifer Saul Michael Brownstein (ed.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    On the surface, developing a social psychology of science seems compelling as a way to understand how individual social cognition – in aggregate – contributes towards individual and group behavior within scientific communities (Kitcher, 2002). However, in cases where the functional input-output profile of psychological processes cannot be mapped directly onto the observed behavior of working scientists, it becomes clear that the relationship between psychological claims and normative philosophy of science should be refined. For example, a robust body of (...)
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  35.  24
    The Case for Responsibility of the IT Industry to Promote Equality for Women in Computing.Eva Turner - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):247-260.
    This paper investigates the relationship between the role that information technology (IT) has played in the development of women’s employment, the possibility of women having a significant influence on the technology’s development, and the way that the IT industry perceives women as computer scientists, users and consumers. The industry’s perception of women and men is investigated through the portrayal of them in computing advertisements. While women are increasingly updating their technological skills and know-how, and (...)
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  36.  17
    The Power of Weak Competitors: Women Scholars, “Popular Science,” and the Building of a Scientific Community in Italy, 1860s-1930s. [REVIEW]Paola Govoni - 2013 - Science in Context 26 (3):405-436.
    ArgumentThe history of Italian “popular science” publishing from the 1860s to the 1930s provides the context to explore three phenomena: the building of a scientific community, the entering of women into higher education, and scientists’ reaction to women in science. The careers of Evangelina Bottero and Carolina Magistrelli, science writers and teachers in an institute of higher education, offer hints towards an understanding of those interrelated macro phenomena. The dialogue between a case study and the general context (...)
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  37.  16
    Japanese Women in Science and Technology.Motoko Kuwahara - 2001 - Minerva 39 (2):203-216.
    Women make up about ten per cent of the scientists and engineers in Japan. The aim of this essay is to make clear why, even in the year 2001, there are so few women in these disciplines. I will suggest that the socio-economic structure and gender ideology of Japan since the Second World War is responsible for this shortage which is often erroneously attributed to the cultural traditions of feudal Japan.
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  38.  6
    Solutions to Gender Balance in STEM Fields Through Support, Training, Education and Mentoring: Report of the International Women in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering Task Group.Gilda Barabino, Monique Frize, Fatimah Ibrahim, Eleni Kaldoudi, Lenka Lhotska, Loredana Marcu, Magdalena Stoeva, Virginia Tsapaki & Eva Bezak - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics.
    The aim of this article is to offer a view of the current status of women in medical physics and biomedical engineering, while focusing on solutions towards gender balance and providing examples of current activities carried out at national and international levels. The International Union of Physical and Engineering Scientists in Medicine is committed to advancing women in science and health and has several initiatives overseen by the Women in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering Task Group. (...)
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  39.  29
    Gender Differences in Publication Productivity Among Academic Scientists and Engineers in the U.S. And China: Similarities and Differences.Yu Tao, Wei Hong & Ying Ma - 2017 - Minerva 55 (4):459-484.
    Gender differences in science and engineering have been studied in various countries. Most of these studies find that women are underrepresented in the S&E workforce and publish less than their male peers. The factors that contribute to gender differences in experience and performance in S&E careers can vary from one country to another, yet they remain underexplored. This paper is among the first to systematically compare gender differences in the publication productivity of academic scientists and engineers with doctoral (...)
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  40.  30
    Blaming All Women: On Regulation of Prostitution in State Socialist Czechoslovakia.Barbara Havelková - 2016 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (1):165-191.
    The article explores how Czechoslovakia reacted to the persistence of prostitution during State Socialism when its underlying Marxist–Leninist ideology predicted that it should disappear with the overthrow of capitalism. The paper adopts a law in context approach, critically analysing legal instruments as well as expert commentaries by social scientists, legal scholars, judges and prosecutors from the period. It argues that while the Czechoslovak state attempted to suppress prostitution through criminal law, conceptualising it as ‘parasitism’, many of the State Socialist (...)
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  41.  18
    Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More?Inmaculada Melo-Martín - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):491-504.
    The commercialization of academic science has come to be understood as economically desirable for institutions, individual researchers, and the public. Not surprisingly, commercial activity, particularly that which results from patenting, appears to be producing changes in the standards used to evaluate scientists’ performance and contributions. In this context, concerns about a gender gap in patenting activity have arisen and some have argued for the need to encourage women to seek more patents. They believe that because academic advancement is (...)
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  42.  16
    Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More? [REVIEW]Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):491-504.
    The commercialization of academic science has come to be understood as economically desirable for institutions, individual researchers, and the public. Not surprisingly, commercial activity, particularly that which results from patenting, appears to be producing changes in the standards used to evaluate scientists’ performance and contributions. In this context, concerns about a gender gap in patenting activity have arisen and some have argued for the need to encourage women to seek more patents. They believe that because academic advancement is (...)
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  43. A Bitter Living: Women, Markets, and Social Capital in Early Modern Germany.Sheilagh Ogilvie - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    What role did women play in the pre-industrial European economy? Was it brought about by biology, culture, social institutions, or individual choices? And what were its consequences - for women, for men, for society at large? Women were key to the changes in the European economy between 1600 and 1800 that paved the way for industrialization. But we still know little about this female 'shadow economy' - and nothing quantitative or systematic.This book tackles these questions in a (...)
     
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  44. Hayatıni Seçen Kadın: ".Nermin Abadan-Unat - 2010 - Doğan Kitap.
  45. Hannah Arendt: Der Weg Einer Grossen Denkerin.Kurt Sontheimer - 2005 - Piper.
  46. Revolutions in Knowledge: Feminism in the Social Sciences.Sue Rosenberg Zalk & Janice Gordon-Kelter (eds.) - 1992 - Westview Press.
  47.  32
    The Use and Abuse of Scientific Studies.Kathryn Paxton George - 1992 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (2):217-233.
    In response to Evelyn Pluhar'sWho Can Be Morally Obligated to Be a Vegetarian? in this journal issue, the author has read all of Pluhar's citations for the accuracy of her claims and had these read by an independent nutritionist. Detailed analysis of Pluhar's argument shows that she attempts to make her case by consistent misappropriation of the findings and conclusions of the studies she cites. Pluhar makes sweeping generalizations from scanty data, ignores causal explanations given by scientists, equates hypothesis (...)
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  48.  51
    The Ethics of Moral Compromise for Stem Cell Research Policy.Zubin Master & G. K. D. Crozier - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):50-65.
    In the US, stem cell research is at a moral impasse—many see this research as ethically mandated due to its potential for ameliorating major diseases, while others see this research as ethically impermissible because it typically involves the destruction of embryos and use of ova from women. Because their creation does not require embryos or ova, induced pluripotent stem cells offer the most promising path for addressing the main ethical objections to stem cell research; however, this technology is still (...)
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  49.  5
    Anthropological Comprehension of a Woman-Author as the Subject of Culture Through the Prism of Language and Literature.I. A. Koliieva & T. A. Kuptsova - 2019 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 15:123-133.
    _Purpose._ To study the phenomenon of a woman-author as a subject of culture and philosophy from a development of literary aspect in the works both Western and Ukrainian scientists. To define the significance of the philosophical representation of the gender stereotypes to reconsider their place and role in the socio cultural discourse. _Theoretical basis._ To investigate the theoretical framework in the postmodern philosophy the cross-disciplinary approach is used. The comparative approach is methodologically important to clarify the problems concerning a (...)
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  50.  26
    Decision Theoretic Model of the Productivity Gap.Liam Kofi Bright - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (2):421-442.
    Using a decision theoretic model of scientists’ time allocation between potential research projects I explain the fact that on average women scientists publish less research papers than men scientists. If scientists are incentivised to publish as many papers as possible, then it is necessary and sufficient for a productivity gap to arise that women scientists anticipate harsher treatment of their manuscripts than men scientists anticipate for their manuscripts. I present evidence that (...) do expect harsher treatment and that scientists’ are incentivised to publish as many papers as possible, and discuss some epistemological consequences of this conjecture. (shrink)
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