Results for 'Women's rights'

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  1.  39
    Women’s Rights to Property in Marriage, Divorce, and Widowhood in Uganda: The Problematic Aspects. [REVIEW]Anthony Luyirika Kafumbe - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (2):199-221.
    This article examines women’s rights to property in marriage, upon divorce, and upon the death of a spouse in Uganda, highlighting the problematic aspects in both the state-made (statutory) and non-state-made (customary and religious) laws. It argues that, with the exception of the 1995 Constitution, the subordinate laws that regulate the distribution, management, and ownership of property during marriage, upon divorce, and death of a spouse are discriminatory of women. It is shown that even where the relevant statutory laws (...)
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  2. Human Rights, Women's Rights, Gender Mainstreaming, and Diversity: The Language Question.Yvanka B. Raynova - 2015 - In Community, Praxis, and Values in a Postmetaphysical Age: Studies on Exclusion and Social Integration in Feminist Theory and Contemporary Philosophy. Axia Academic Publishers. pp. 38-89.
    In the following study the author goes back to the beginnings of the Women's Rights movements in order to pose the question on gender equality by approaching it through the prism of language as a powerful tool in human rights battles. This permits her to show the deep interrelation between women's struggle for recognition and some particular women rights, like the "feminization" of professional titles and the implementation of a gender sensitive language. Hence she argues (...)
     
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  3.  62
    Women's Rights and Cultural Differences.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2004 - Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):111-133.
    The rights of women in fundamentalist Muslim countries has become a cause celebre for many North American women; however, the problem of how to balance respect for women's rights and respect for cultural differences remains in dispute, even within feminist theory. This paper explores how U.S. feminists who are serious about supporting the struggles of women across cultural borders might best adjudicate the seeming tension between women's rights and cultural autonomy. Upon examining 4 representative approaches (...)
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  4.  31
    The Constitution of Afghanistan and Women’s Rights.Niaz A. Shah - 2005 - Feminist Legal Studies 13 (2):239-258.
    This article argues that women’s human rights were and are being violated in Afghanistan regardless of who governs the country: Kings, secular rulers, Mujahideen or Taliban, or the incumbent internationally backed government of Karzai. The provisions of the new constitution regarding women’s rights are analysed under three categories: neutral, protective and discriminatory. It is argued that the current constitution is a step in the right direction but, far from protecting women’s rights effectively, it requires substantial revamping. The (...)
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  5.  15
    Development of Women's Rights in Lithuania: Recognition of Women Political Rights.Toma Birmontienė & Virginija Jurėnienė - 2009 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 116 (2):23-44.
    The article discusses the problems of development of women’s political rights in Lithuania in the legal historical aspect starting from the 16th century, when some property and individual rights were enshrined in the first codifications of the laws of the Great Duchy of Lithuania. The aim of the article is to show that women’s struggle for political equality and suffrage at the end of the 19th and at the turn of the 20th century correlates with the movement for (...)
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  6.  38
    Exposing Violences: Using Women's Human Rights Theory to Reconceptualize Food Rights[REVIEW]Anne C. Bellows - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):249-279.
    Exposing food violences – hunger,malnutrition, and poisoning from environmentalmismanagement – requires policy action thatconfronts the structured invisibility of theseviolences. Along with the hidden deprivation offood is the physical and political isolation ofcritical knowledge on food violences and needs,and for policy strategies to address them. Iargue that efforts dedicated on behalf of ahuman right to food can benefit from thetheoretical analysis and activist work of theinternational Women's Rights are Human Rights(WRHR) movement. WRHR focuses on women andgirls; the food (...)
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  7.  20
    “It’s Another Way Of Making A Really Big Fuss” Human Rights And Women’s Activism In The United Kingdom: An Interview With Tania Pouwhare. [REVIEW]Tania Pouwhare & Emily Grabham - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):97-112.
    Following the “Encountering Human Rights” conference in January 2007, Emily Grabham interviewed Tania Pouwhare, a women’s rights activist working at the Women’s Resource Centre in London. Their discussion engaged with the professionalisation of activism, funding constraints and New Labour policies and their impact on immigrant women. Against a background of financial insecurity and huge demand for their services, many women’s organisations in the United Kingdom struggle to use human rights law to advance women’s rights. Nevertheless, the (...)
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  8. Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women's Human Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Yale University Press.
    How can women’s rights be seen as a universal value rather than a Western value imposed upon the rest of the world? Addressing this question, Eileen Hunt Botting offers the first comparative study of writings by Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. Although Wollstonecraft and Mill were the primary philosophical architects of the view that women’s rights are human rights, Botting shows how non-Western thinkers have revised and internationalized their original theories since the nineteenth century. Botting explains (...)
     
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  9.  32
    Faith in the State? Asian Women’s Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K.Pragna Patel - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, and (...)
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  10.  26
    Democracy, Human Rights and Women's Health.Jalil Safaei - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):134.
    Significant improvements in human rights and democracy have been made since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations in 1948. Yet, human rights, especially women's rights, are still being violated in many parts of the developing world. The adverse effects of such violations on women's and children's health are well known, but they are rarely measured. This study uses cross-national data from over 145 countries to estimate the impact (...)
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  11.  90
    The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW]Sohail H. Hashmi - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's (...), but members of the more conservative religious establishment have typically curbed or rejected these efforts. Muslim women themselves have established various responses to the question of Islam's compatibility with women's rights. While some embrace the value and compatibility of both, others reject the propriety of either Western conceptions of rights, or the Islamic tradition, as harmful for women. Muslim reformers and feminists have much to learn from comparative studies with other faith communities that have undergone similar struggles and transformations. (shrink)
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  12. The Ethics of Abortion: Women’s Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice.Christopher Kaczor - 2010 - Routledge.
    Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published. _The Ethics of Abortion_ critically evaluates all the major grounds for denying fetal personhood, including the views of those who defend not only abortion but also infanticide. It also provides several justifications for the conclusion that all human beings, including those in utero, should be respected as persons. This book also critiques the view that abortion is not wrong even (...)
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  13. Women's Rights Human Rights International Feminist Perspectives.Julie Peters & Andrea Wolper - 1995
  14.  42
    Towards Cosmopolitan Citizenship? Women’s Rights in Divided Turkey.Nora Fisher Onar & Hande Paker - 2012 - Theory and Society 41 (4):375-394.
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  15. Feminism and the Third Republic Women's Political and Civil Rights in France, 1918-1945.Paul Smith - 1996
  16. Women's Political and Civil Rights in the French Third Republic, 1918-1940.Paul Smith - 1992
     
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  17.  76
    Right to Food; Right to Feed; Right to Be Fed. The Intersection of Women's Rights and the Right to Food.Penny Van Esterik - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):225-232.
    This paper explores conceptual and practical linkages between women and food, and argues that food security cannot be realized until women are centrally included in policy discussions about food. Women's special relationship with food is culturally constructed and not a natural division of labor. Women's identity and sense of self is often based on their ability to feed their families and others; food insecurity denies them this right. Thus the interpretation of food as a human right requires that (...)
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  18.  20
    A “Quick and Dirty” Approach to Women’s Emancipation and Human Rights?1.Sari Kouvo - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):37-46.
    During the past decade, women’s and human rights ‘language’ has moved from the margins to the ‘mainstream’ of international law and politics. In this paper, the author argues that while feminists and human rights activists criticise the ‘mainstream’s interpretation of women’s and human rights, ‘we’ do not question what becoming part of the mainstream and the cosmopolitan classes has meant for us. Drawing on examples of how women’s and human rights arguments have been used in the (...)
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  19.  49
    Cross-Border Trafficking in Nepal and India—Violating Women’s Rights.Tameshnie Deane - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (4):491-513.
    Human trafficking is both a human rights violation and the fastest growing criminal industry in the world. This article examines cross-border trafficking of girls and women in Nepal to India. It gives a brief explanation of what is meant by trafficking and then looks at the reasons behind trafficking. In Nepal, women and children are trafficked internally and to India and the Middle East for commercial sexual exploitation or forced marriage, as well as to India and within the country (...)
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  20.  19
    Women’s Rights in Islamic Shari’A: Between Interpretation, Culture and Politics.Dina Mansour - 2014 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 11 (1):1-24.
    This article analyses existing biases – whether due to misinterpretation, culture or politics – in the application of women’s rights under Islamic Shari’a law. The paper argues that though in its inception, one purpose of Islamic law may have aimed at elevating the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, biases in interpreting such teachings have failed to free women from discrimination and have even added “divinity” to their persistent subjugation. By examining two case studies – Saudi Arabia and Egypt (...)
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  21. The Right to Culture and the Culture of Rights: A Critical Perspective on Women’s Sexual Rights in Africa. [REVIEW]Sylvia Tamale - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):47-69.
    The opposition of ‘culture’ and ‘rights’ is not uncommon in feminist legal discourse. This article argues that such an approach is fraught with danger as it creates an extremely restrictive framework within which African women can challenge domination; it limits our strategic interventions for transforming society and essentially plays into the hands of those seeking to perpetuate and solidify the existing structures of patriarchy. Drawing examples from a parallel research on Gender, Law and Sexuality, I propose that a more (...)
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  22.  12
    Iranian Law and Women's Rights.Mehrangiz Kar - 2007 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 4 (1).
    Agitation for women's rights in Iran is entwined with broader movements for freedom and reform that critique the Islamic Republic's shari'a law as discriminatory. Despite the foundation of these reform efforts in the social realities of contemporary Iran, anyone who critiques laws governing the rights of women is prone to the charge of insulting the sanctity and foundation of Islam and subject to harsh penalties. Reform efforts will be hamstrung until there is a foundation for open discourse (...)
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  23.  40
    Under Western Eyes: On Farris's In the Name of Women's Rights.Baraneh Emadian - 2019 - Critique: Journal of Socialist Theory 47 (1):143-158.
    This essay reflects upon the category of femonationalism as theorised in Sara Farris's book, In the Name of Women's Rights: The Rise of Femonationalism, with a focus on her critique of theories of populism. Farris's approach, it is argued, productively pinpoints the exceptional position of Muslim and non-western migrant women in the reproduction of the material conditions of social reproduction in western Europe. However, the force of Farris's Marxist theorisation of femonationalism is partly undermined by the absence of (...)
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  24.  69
    Westernization and Women’s Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting & Sean Kronewitter - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (4):466-496.
    The publication in 1869 of Mill's Subjection ofWomen gave rise to philosophical and political responses beyond Western Europe on the relationship between Westernization and women's rights in developing, colonial, and post-colonial countries. Through the first comparative study of the Subjection of Women alongside the forewords to six of its earliest non-Western European editions, we explore how this book provoked local intellectuals in Russia, Chile, and India to engage its liberal utilitarian, imperial, Orientalist, and feminist ideas. By showing how (...)
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  25.  46
    Can Human Rights Accommodate Women's Rights? Towards an Embodied Account of Social Norms, Social Meaning, and Cultural Change.Moira Gatens - 2004 - Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):275-299.
    The paper is in four parts. The first part offers a brief reminder of the historical context for human rights as women's rights. The second part notes the relative lack of attention in human rights theory to the roles of social meaning and what has been called the ‘social imaginary’. The third part suggests that the social imaginary — understood in terms of the always present backdrop to meaningful social action — may be seen as a (...)
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  26. Feminism, Family, and Women's Rights: A Hermeneutic Realist Perspective.Don Browning - 2003 - Zygon 38 (2):317-332.
    In this article I apply the insights of hermeneutic realism to a practical-theological ethics that addresses the international crisis of families and women’s rights. Hermeneutic realism affirms the hermeneutic philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer but enriches it with the dialectic of participation and distanciation developed by Paul Ricoeur. This approach finds a place for sciences such as evolutionary psychology within a hermeneutically informed ethic. It also points to a multidimensional model of practical reason that views it as implicitly or explicitly (...)
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  27.  32
    ‘Take Your Rosaries Out of Our Ovaries:’ Women's Rights in Argentina and Bolivia.Caitlin Guse - 2010 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 1 (2).
    Despite being neighbouring countries, Bolivia and Argentina appear to be a world apart in terms of economics, international relations, and women’s rights. Historically, women’s rights have been fairly similar in both countries, but while one country seemingly made “progress,” the other country appeared to be stagnating. By exploring violence against women, and the current state of contraception and abortion laws it becomes apparent that “progress” does not necessarily bring about social change.
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  28.  28
    Religion and Women’s Rights: Susan Moller Okin, Mary Wollstonecraft, and the Multiple Feminist Liberal Traditions.Eileen Hunt Botting & Ariana Zlioba - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1169-1188.
    ABSTRACTWe trace Susan Moller Okin’s reception of Mary Wollstonecraft with respect to the relationship between religion and feminist liberalism, by way of manuscripts housed at Somerville College, Oxford and Harvard University. These unpublished documents – dated from 1967 to 1998 – include her Somerville advising file, with papers dated from 1967 to 1979; her 1970 Oxford B.Phil. thesis on the feminist political theory of Wollstonecraft, William Thompson, and J.S. Mill; her teaching notes on Wollstonecraft originating in 1978, for her course (...)
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  29. When Equality Justifies Women's Subjection: Luce Irigaray's Critique of Equality and the Fathers' Rights Movement.Serene J. Khader - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 48-74.
    The “fathers’ rights” movement represents policies that undermine women’s reproductive autonomy as furthering the cause of gender equality. Khader argues that this movement exploits two general weaknesses of equality claims identified by Luce Irigaray. She shows that Irigaray criticizes equality claims for their appeal to a genderneutral universal subject and for their acceptance of our existing symbolic repertoire. This article examines how the plaintiffs’ rhetoric in two contemporary “fathers’ rights” court cases takes advantage of these weaknesses.
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  30. Rizal’s Letter to the Malolos Young Women: A Vindication of Filipino Women’s Rights During His Time.Rosallia Domingo - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2).
    The author argues that Jose Rizal’s “Letter to the young women of Malolos” is a vindication of Filipino women’s rights during his time. The author examines the situation of the Filipino women as depicted in the “Letter.” Then she presents Mary Wollstonecraft’s notion of vindication of women’s rights to demonstrate that Rizal’s “Letter” is an instance of such a vindication as it calls for Filipina empowerment.
     
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  31.  33
    Globalizing Women’s Rights: Overcoming the Apartheid.María Pía Lara - 2004 - Thesis Eleven 78 (1):61-84.
    This article deals with the empirical example of how social subjects, in this case women, have appropriated the language of rights in order to demand social inclusion. Since there are many different points of view in feminist theory with regard to how to deal with the idea of women’s rights, this article is divided into three sections. In the first section, I focus on how some important normative contents about democracy and rights have already been accepted by (...)
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  32.  40
    Women's Rights in Muslim Societies: Lessons From the Moroccan Experience.N. Guessous - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (4-5):525-533.
    Major changes have taken place in Muslim societies in general during the last decades. Traditional family and social organizational structures have come into conflict with the perceptions and needs of development and modern state-building. Moreover, the international context of globalization, as well as changes in intercommunity relations through immigration, have also deeply affected social and cultural mutations by facilitating contact between different cultures and civilizations. Of the dilemmas arising from these changes, those concerning women’s and men’s roles were the most (...)
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  33.  23
    Abortion Needs or Abortion Rights? Claiming State Accountability for Women’s Reproductive Welfare: Family Planning Association of Northern Ireland V. Minister for Health, Social Services and Public Safety.Ruth Fletcher - 2005 - Feminist Legal Studies 13 (1):123-134.
    The Family Planning Association Northern Ireland has recently been successful in holding the state accountable for its duty to safeguard women’s reproductive health and welfare, and clarify the circumstances in which abortion is lawful. By demanding that the Minister for Health investigate abortion provision and produce abortion guidance, F.P.A.N.I. hope to improve the quality of abortion services and alleviate the situation of those women who are legally entitled to abortion in Northern Ireland but cannot access it there. This action has (...)
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  34.  49
    Trafficking and Women's Rights: Beyond the Sex Industry to 'Other Industries'.Christien van den Anker - 2006 - Journal of Global Ethics 2 (2):163 – 182.
    In this article I put forward three lines of argument. Firstly, the current debate on trafficking in human beings focuses narrowly on exploitation in the sex industry. This has produced a stand-off between moralists and liberals which is detrimental to developing strategies to combat trafficking. Moreover, this narrow focus leads to missing out the large numbers of women who are trafficked into other industries. It also masks some of the root causes of trafficking. In this article I therefore compare the (...)
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  35.  18
    In Vitro Veritas: New Reproductive and Genetic Technologies and Women's Rights in Contemporary France.Sandra Reineke - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):91-125.
    This study examines recent French bioethics laws governing the uses of new reproductive and genetic technologies (NRGTs)—including in-vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood, prenatal diagnostics, sex selection, and cloning—in light of feminist claims to women's rights, especially a woman's right to reproductive freedom. To this end, the study explores two interrelated questions: First, to what extent have French feminists supported NRGT development and treatment? Second, to what extent do French national bioethics debates, laws, and policies reflect feminist reactions to NRGTs? (...)
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  36.  15
    Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights.G. B. Levey - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):144-146.
    Book Information Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights. By Ayelet Shachar. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 2001. Pp. xiv + 193. Hardback, Aus.$140. Paperback, $48.95.
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  37.  13
    Gender Mainstreaming and the Framing of Women's Rights in Europe: The Contribution of the Council of Europe. [REVIEW]Jill Lovecy - 2002 - Feminist Legal Studies 10 (3):271-283.
    Drawing on published materials from the Committee of Ministers, Assembly and expert working groups of the Council of Europe, this paper investigates the distinctive contribution made to the framing of women's rights over the last two decades by this regional organisation, which recent studies of the `Europeanisation' of public policies have largely neglected. Elements of congruence are identified between the major mobilising themes of second wave feminism and the Council's emphasis on protecting individual rights, and its sensitivity (...)
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  38.  17
    Gender Jihad: Muslim Women, Islamic Jurisprudence, and Women's Rights.Melanie P. Mejia - 2007 - Kritike 1 (1):1-24.
    Muslim women's rights have been a topic of discussion and debate over the past few decades, and with a good reason. Islamic Law is considered by many as patriarchal and particularly oppressive to women, and yet there are also others-Muslim women-who have rigorously defended their religion by claiming that Islam is the guarantor par excellence of women's rights. A big question begs to be answered: is Islam particularly oppressive to women?The Qur'an has addressed women's issues (...)
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  39.  10
    "The Most Belligerent Non-Resistant": Lucretia Mott on Women's Rights.Lisa Pace Vetter - 2015 - Political Theory 43 (5):600-630.
    Lucretia Mott is widely recognized as a moral and spiritual leader in the abolitionist and early women’s rights movements. She has been characterized as a disciple of William Lloyd Garrison, a proliferator of Mary Wollstonecraft’s ideas, and a religious promoter of human rights whose efforts were surpassed by the theoretically sophisticated and politically astute Elizabeth Cady Stanton. These portrayals paradoxically elevate Mott’s status while understating the originality of her views. This analysis examines Mott’s speeches and writings in detail (...)
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  40.  49
    Women’s Right to Autonomy and Identity in European Human Rights Law: Manifesting One’s Religion.Jill Marshall - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (3):177-192.
    Freedom of religious expression is to many a fundamental element of their identity. Yet the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Islamic headscarf issue does not refer to autonomy and identity rights of the individual women claimants. The case law focuses on Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides a legal human right to freedom of religious expression. The way that provision is interpreted is critically contrasted here with the (...)
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  41.  18
    A Critique of the Rhetoric, Ambivalence, and Promise in the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa.’Dejo Olowu - 2006 - Human Rights Review 8 (1):78-101.
    The desire to formulate a viable treaty framework for women’s rights that will meet the challenges of the sociocultural peculiarities in Africa led to the emergence of the original draft Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women in the twilight years of the Organization of African Unity (OAU). Without doubt, the recent adoption of the African Women’s Protocol by the Assembly of African Heads of State and Government in July (...)
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  42.  9
    Islam and Women's Sexual Health and Rights in Senegal.Codou Bop - 2005 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 2 (1).
    The objective of this study is to analyse the tensions between conceptualizations about Islam, women's sexual health and rights in Senegal. Sexual rights are defined here as the right to choose a partner, the right to enjoy sex without fear of violence or disease, and the right to physical integrity. These rights are examined through legal, Islamic and International frameworks in the context of their relevance to Senegal. The general population's, and Ulamas', positions, attitudes and behaviours (...)
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  43.  29
    Women’s Right to Asylum: Protecting the Rights of Female Asylum Seekers in Europe? [REVIEW]Jane Freedman - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):413-433.
    Criticisms have been made against international laws and conventions on asylum and refugees, arguing that these have been based on a male model of definition, which have ignored women’s persecutions. This article will argue that recent developments in European asylum policy have the potential to deepen this discrimination and to further reduce the rights of female asylum seekers. Although there have been some positive developments in jurisprudence that have recognised that gender-specific persecution may be the basis for granting asylum, (...)
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  44.  22
    Women’s Right To Asylum: Protecting The Rights Of Female Asylum Seekers In Europe?Jane Freedman - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):413-433.
    Criticisms have been made against international laws and conventions on asylum and refugees, arguing that these have been based on a male model of definition, which have ignored women’s persecutions. This article will argue that recent developments in European asylum policy have the potential to deepen this discrimination and to further reduce the rights of female asylum seekers. Although there have been some positive developments in jurisprudence that have recognised that gender-specific persecution may be the basis for granting asylum, (...)
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  45. Feminism, Women's Human Rights, and Cultural Differences.Susan Moller Okin - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (2):32 - 52.
    The recent global movement for women's human rights has achieved considerable re-thinking of human rights as previously understood. Since many of women's rights violations occur in the private sphere of family life, and are justified by appeals to cultural or religious norms, both families and cultures (including their religious aspects) have come under critical scrutiny.
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  46.  6
    Are the Powers of Traditional Leaders in South Africa Compatible with Women’s Equal Rights?: Three Conceptual Arguments.Kristina A. Bentley - 2005 - Human Rights Review 6 (4):48-68.
    This paper is about conflicts of rights, and the particularly difficult challenges that such conflicts present when they entail women’s equality and claims of cultural recognition. South Africa since 1994 has presented a series of challenging—but by no means unique—circumstances many of which entail conflicting claims of rights. The central aim of this paper is, to make sense of the idea that the institution of traditional leadership can be sustained—and indeed given new, more concrete powers—in a democracy; and (...)
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  47.  15
    Women's Rights and Bioethics.Lorraine Dennerstein & Margret M. Baltes (eds.) - 2000 - UNESCO.
    This book, based on the Round Table on Bioethics and Women held at UNESCO during the Fourth Session of the International Bioethics Committee (IBC), presents the ...
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  48.  20
    From Human Wrongs to Universal Rights: Communication and Feminist Challenges for the Promotion of Women's Health in the Third World.Sirrku Kristiina Hellsten - 2001 - Developing World Bioethics 1 (2):98–115.
    This article argues that in the quest for global bioethics in its relation to the promotion of women's health and women's rights, the main challenge is to, first, rise above the relativist trap and second, to solve the false dilemma between individualism and collectivism. Particularly in order to improve women's position and advance their well‐being in many developing countries with patriarchal cultural practices, there is an urgent need to introduce modern medicine and to share more evenly (...)
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  49.  13
    When Equality Justifies Women's Subjection: Luce Irigaray's Critique of Equality and the Fathers' Rights Movement.Serene J. Khader - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):48-74.
    The “fathers’ rights” movement represents policies that undermine women's reproductive autonomy as furthering the cause of gender equality. Khader argues that this movement exploits two general weaknesses of equality claims identified by Luce Irigaray. She shows that Irigaray criticizes equality claims for their appeal to a genderneutral universal subject and for their acceptance of our existing symbolic repertoire. This article examines how the plaintiffs’ rhetoric in two contemporary “fathers’ rights” court cases takes advantage of these weaknesses.
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    Power and Rights in the Community: Paralegals as Leaders in Women’s Legal Empowerment in Tanzania.Helen Dancer - 2018 - Feminist Legal Studies 26 (1):47-64.
    What can an analysis of power in local communities contribute to debates on women’s legal empowerment and the role of paralegals in Africa? Drawing upon theories of power and rights, and research on legal empowerment in African plural legal systems, this article explores the challenges for paralegals in facilitating women’s access to justice in Tanzania, which gave statutory recognition to paralegals in the Legal Aid Act 2017. Land conflicts represent the single-biggest source of local legal disputes in Tanzania and (...)
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