Results for 'artha'

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  1. Artha: Meaning.Jonardon Ganeri - 2011 - Oxford University Press India.
    This book examines the theories of meaning or artha in different schools of philosophical thought highlighting the significant relationship between 'word' and 'meaning'. It demonstrates that classical Indian theory of language can inform and be informed by contemporary philosophy.
     
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    Artha: Meaning. By Jonardon Ganeri. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. Ix+ 258. Hardcover Rs 920.00. Buddhism in the Public Square: Reorienting Global Interdependence. By Peter D. Hershock. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. Pp. X+ 229. Price Not Given. [REVIEW]Ghazala Irfan Oxford - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):406-408.
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    Artha: Meaning.C. Goodman - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (3):455-458.
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    Meaning Without Words: The Contrast Between Artha and Ruta in Mahāyāna Sūtras.Ligeia Lugli - 2010 - Buddhist Studies Review 27:139-176.
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    19 the Doctrine Of'aham-Artha'.Rv Joshi - 1993 - In Alex Wayman & Rāma Karaṇa Śarmā (eds.), Researches in Indian and Buddhist Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Professor Alex Wayman. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. pp. 247.
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  6. The Concept of Dharma in Artha and K\={a} Ma Literature.Friedrich Wilhelm - 1978 - In Wendy Doniger & J. Duncan M. Derrett (eds.), The Concept of Duty in South Asia. Vikas Pub. House.
     
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  7. Artha =.Jonardon Ganeri - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This second volume in the Foundations of Philosophy in India series is an important contribution to the philosophy of language. Here Jonardon Ganeri highlights the significant relationship between semantic power and epistemic power to understand the important philosophical category of meaning.
     
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  8. Chapter VI. Kautilya's Artha-Śāstra.Charles A. Moore & Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan - 1957 - In Charles A. Moore & Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan (eds.), A Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 193-224.
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  9. Bibliography on Dharma and Artha in Ancient and Mediaeval India.Ludo Rocher & Ludwik Sternbach - 1975 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (3):564.
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    Hindu Philosophy.Shyam Ranganathan - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The compound “Hindu philosophy” is ambiguous. Minimally it stands for a tradition of Indian philosophical thinking. However, it could be interpreted as designating one comprehensive philosophical doctrine, shared by all Hindu thinkers. The term “Hindu philosophy” is often used loosely in this philosophical or doctrinal sense, but this usage is misleading. There is no single, comprehensive philosophical doctrine shared by all Hindus that distinguishes their view from contrary philosophical views associated with other Indian religious movements such as Buddhism or Jainism (...)
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  11. Understanding a Philosophical Text: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to the Problem of “Meaning' in Jayanta's Nyāyamañjarī, Book 5”.Elisa Freschi & Artemij Keidan - forthcoming - In Patrick McAllister & Helmut Krasser (eds.), Jayanta on Buddhist Nominalism.
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    Retrieving the Hidden Meaning: Jain Commentarial Techniques and the Art of Memory. [REVIEW]Mari Jyväsjärvi - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (2):133-162.
    One of the peculiar characteristics of the vast body of Jain commentarial literature is the primacy given to artha , meaning, over sūtra , the root text itself. It is the task of the commentator—or, in a pedagogical context, the teacher—to retrieve and explain a text’s true, hidden meaning, which often appears to stretch and even contradict its apparent meaning. This article examines the interpretive processes in one of the most important Jain commentaries on monastic discipline, the Bṛhatkalpabhāṣya attributed (...)
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    Ecology and Indian Culture.Abha Singh - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:139-145.
    Since time immemorial Indian culture has been upholding a symbiotic relationship between man and environment. It has led to the all round evolution of Indian culture as an integral whole. This assimilation has been possible due to the spiritual vision of Indian seers. Every Culture is based upon certain values. In India values are usually discussed in the context of the principal ends of human life (chatuspurusartha): dharma (moral value), artha (political and economic values), kama (sensual value) and moksha (...)
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    Sens Ja. Koncepcja podmiotu w filozofii indyjskiej (sankhja-joga).Jakubczak Marzenna - 2013 - Kraków, Poland: Ksiegarnia Akademicka.
    The Sense of I: Conceptualizing Subjectivity: In Indian Philosophy (Sāṃkhya-Yoga) This book discusses the sense of I as it is captured in the Sāṃkhya-Yoga tradition – one of the oldest currents of Indian philosophy, dating back to as early as the 7th c. BCE. The author offers her reinterpretation of the Yogasūtra and Sāṃkhyakārikā complemented with several commentaries, including the writings of Hariharānanda Ᾱraṇya – a charismatic scholar-monk believed to have re-established the Sāṃkhya-Yoga lineage in the early 20th century. The (...)
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  15. Epicureanism, Charvaka and Consumerism: A Search for Philosophy of Happiness.Desh Raj Sirswal - manuscript
    Epicurus was a Greek philosopher and more interested in pleasure or its pursuit than other ideals. He said, “No pleasure is a bad thing in itself, but the things which produce certain pleasures entail disturbances many times greater than the pleasures themselves.” Epicurus tells us that wisdom is the knowledge of which pleasures are good for us. While at times this led to a negative view of his philosophy, the reality is his thinking was very advanced and developed, leading to (...)
     
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