Results for 'consonants'

56 found
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  1.  11
    Orthographic Distinctiveness of Consonants and Recognition Learning.Donald H. Kauser & Edward J. Pavur - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):435.
  2.  10
    Immediate Memory for Consonants as a Function of Frequency of Occurrence and Frequency of Appearance.James H. Korn & Richard H. Lindley - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (2):149.
  3.  8
    Linguistic Constraints on Statistical Word Segmentation: The Role of Consonants in Arabic and English.Itamar Kastner & Frans Adriaans - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):494-518.
    Statistical learning is often taken to lie at the heart of many cognitive tasks, including the acquisition of language. One particular task in which probabilistic models have achieved considerable success is the segmentation of speech into words. However, these models have mostly been tested against English data, and as a result little is known about how a statistical learning mechanism copes with input regularities that arise from the structural properties of different languages. This study focuses on statistical word segmentation in (...)
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  4.  18
    Input Limitations for Cortical Combination-Sensitive Neurons Coding Stop-Consonants?Christoph E. Schreiner - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):284-284.
    A tendency of auditory cortical neurons to respond at the beginning of major transitions in sounds rather than providing a continuously updated spectral-temporal profile may impede the generation of combination-sensitivity for certain classes of stimuli. Potential consequences of the cortical encoding of voiced stop-consonants on representational principles derived from orderly output constraints are discussed.
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  5.  30
    Primate Feedstock for the Evolution of Consonants.Adriano R. Lameira, Ian Maddieson & Klaus Zuberbühler - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (2):60-62.
  6.  5
    Rule Learning Over Consonants and Vowels in a Non-Human Animal.Daniela M. de la Mora & Juan M. Toro - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):307-312.
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  7.  23
    Use of Phonetic Specificity During the Acquisition of New Words: Differences Between Consonants and Vowels.Thierry Nazzi - 2005 - Cognition 98 (1):13-30.
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  8.  1
    Adult Learning of Novel Words in a Non-Native Language: Consonants, Vowels, and Tones.Silvana Poltrock, Hui Chen, Celia Kwok, Hintat Cheung & Thierry Nazzi - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  9.  25
    Structural Generalizations Over Consonants and Vowels in 11-Month-Old Infants.Ferran Pons & Juan M. Toro - 2010 - Cognition 116 (3):361-367.
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  10.  5
    Vowels, Then Consonants: Early Bias Switch in Recognizing Segmented Word Forms.Léo-Lyuki Nishibayashi & Thierry Nazzi - 2016 - Cognition 155:188-203.
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  11.  17
    Processing Interactions Between Phonology and Melody: Vowels Sing but Consonants Speak.Régine Kolinsky, Pascale Lidji, Isabelle Peretz, Mireille Besson & José Morais - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):1-20.
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  12.  27
    Effects of Categorical Speech Perception During Active Discrimination of Stop-Consonants and Vowels Within the Left Superior Temporal Cortex.Altmann Christian, Uesaki Maiko, Ono Kentaro, Matsuhashi Masao, Mima Tatsuya & Fukuyama Hidenao - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  13.  13
    Final Phonem Consonants In Dialects Of Turkey Turkish.Özkan Aydoğdu - 2009 - Journal of Turkish Studies 4:576-597.
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  14.  6
    Reanalysis of controversial aspects of chedungun spoken in Alto Biobío phonology: phonetic and phonological status of the interdental consonants.Gastón F. Salamanca Gutiérrez, Jaime Patricio Soto-Barba, Juan Héctor Painequeo Paillán & Manuel Jesús Jiménez Mardones - 2017 - Alpha (Osorno) 45:273-289.
    Resumen: Este artículo tiene como foco de estudio la fonología segmental del mapudungun, en general, y el estatus de los fonos interdentales /en el chedungun hablado en Alto Biobío, en particular. Se elicitó una lista léxica adaptada de Croese, 30 colaboradores adultos, bilingües de chedungun y español, pertenecientes a 10 localidades pehuenches de esta comuna. Mediante evidencia cuantitativa, visual, palatográfica y de contraste en ambiente análogo, se concluye que dichos fonos tienen estatus fonémico en la zona señalada.: This article focuses (...)
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  15.  11
    Language Specific Listening of Japanese Geminate Consonants: A Cross-Linguistic Study.Makiko Sadakata, Mizuki Shingai, Simone Sulpizio, Alex Brandmeyer & Kaoru Sekiyama - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  16.  13
    Same-Different Reaction Time to the Sequential Visual Presentation of Vowels and Consonants.Kimberly D. Peterson, J. Richard Simon & Jyh-Hone Wang - 1986 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (4):248-250.
  17.  7
    On the Doubling of Consonants in the Seam of Certain Pāli CompoundsOn the Doubling of Consonants in the Seam of Certain Pali Compounds.Franklin Edgerton - 1921 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 41:462.
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  18.  7
    Chaucer's Double Consonants and Final E.Kemp Malone - 1956 - Mediaeval Studies 18 (1):204-207.
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  19.  4
    The Situation Of Remaining Devoicing Or Sonarisation Of The Devoicing-Explosive Consonants In The Last Sound In ‘Miftahu’L Ferec’.Osman Yildiz - 2011 - Journal of Turkish Studies 6:157-168.
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  20.  4
    Vowels, Consonants, Speech, and Nonspeech.Anthony E. Ades - 1977 - Psychological Review 84 (6):524-530.
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  21.  3
    Perception of the Turkish Consonants by Korean Speakers.Mevlüt Erdem - 2013 - Journal of Turkish Studies 8.
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  22.  3
    The Presence Of Vowels And Consonants Of Türkiye Turkısh Dıalect.Mukim SAĞIR - 2008 - Journal of Turkish Studies 3:563-578.
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  23.  5
    Perception Mirrors Production in 14- and 18-Month-Olds: The Case of Coda Consonants.Clara C. Levelt - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):174-179.
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  24.  2
    Intervocalic Euphonic Consonants in Turkish with a Synchronic View.Fevzi Karademi̇r - 2011 - Journal of Turkish Studies 6:561-598.
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  25.  3
    Notes on the Consonants in the Greek of Asia Minor.D. Emrys Evans - 1918 - Classical Quarterly 12 (3-4):162-.
    The change of the Greek aspirates into the voiceless spirants of the modern language was already beginning to appear in some of the ancient dialects. The intermediate stage in this development is naturally that of affricates, ph, th, kh, becoming pf, tp, kx respectively, a stage seen in such spellings as μετνλλακχóτα. The evidence of the inscriptions shows that the change was not readily effected in Attic, and the clearest mark of this conservatism is the interchange of aspirates and tenues.
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  26.  2
    Vowels and Consonants as Targets in the Search of Single Words.Carlton T. James - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):402-404.
  27.  1
    Setting of Russian Sonorant Consonants [L–l'] Pronunciation in a Bulgarian Audience.N. D. Peneva - 2013 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 2 (4):349.
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  28.  14
    Cross‐Situational Learning of Minimal Word Pairs.Paola Escudero, Karen E. Mulak & Haley A. Vlach - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):455-465.
    Cross-situational statistical learning of words involves tracking co-occurrences of auditory words and objects across time to infer word-referent mappings. Previous research has demonstrated that learners can infer referents across sets of very phonologically distinct words, but it remains unknown whether learners can encode fine phonological differences during cross-situational statistical learning. This study examined learners’ cross-situational statistical learning of minimal pairs that differed on one consonant segment, minimal pairs that differed on one vowel segment, and non-minimal pairs that differed on two (...)
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  29.  46
    The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech Production.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):499-511.
    The species-specific organizational property of speech is a continual mouth open-close alternation, the two phases of which are subject to continual articulatory modulation. The cycle constitutes the syllable, and the open and closed phases are segments framescontent displays that are prominent in many nonhuman primates. The new role of Broca's area and its surround in human vocal communication may have derived from its evolutionary history as the main cortical center for the control of ingestive processes. The frame and content components (...)
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  30.  59
    A Study in Phonetic Symbolism.E. Sapir - 1929 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (3):225.
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  31.  26
    An Experimental Investigation of Memory Span.R. Brener - 1940 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (5):467-482.
  32.  3
    Complexité, éléments et groupes consonantiques en berbère tachelhit.Mohamed Lahrouchi - 2018 - Corela. Cognition, Représentation, Langage 16.
    Cet article apporte des arguments supplémentaires en faveur de l’hypothèse tête-complément dans les racines verbales en tachelhit. Initialement proposée pour rendre compte de la distribution des consonnes dans les racines trilitères ainsi que de la gémination au thème de l’inaccompli, cette hypothèse stipule que les racines contenant une suite obstruante-sonante possèdent une structure hiérarchique binaire où l’obstruante est la tête de la racine et la sonante son complément. Pour justifier le rôle de tête des consonnes obstruantes, cet article évoque le (...)
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  33.  2
    Representation of Speech Sounds in Precategorical Acoustic Storage.Robert G. Crowder - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):14.
  34.  6
    Natural Class, Complementary Distribution, and Speech Perception.Danny D. Steinberg - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (2p1):195.
  35.  7
    Different Roles of Acoustic and Articulatory Information in Short-Term Memory.Chao-Ming Cheng - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):614.
  36.  17
    Eye Movements Reveal Solution Knowledge Prior to Insight.Jessica J. Ellis, Mackenzie G. Glaholt & Eyal M. Reingold - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):768-776.
    In two experiments, participants solved anagram problems while their eye movements were monitored. Each problem consisted of a circular array of five letters: a scrambled four-letter solution word containing three consonants and one vowel, and an additional randomly-placed distractor consonant. Viewing times on the distractor consonant compared to the solution consonants provided an online measure of knowledge of the solution. Viewing times on the distractor consonant and the solution consonants were indistinguishable early in the trial. In contrast, (...)
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  37.  47
    Cross-Modal Iconicity: A Cognitive Semiotic Approach to Sound Symbolism.Felix Ahlner & Jordan Zlatev - 2010 - Sign Systems Studies 38 (1/4):298-346.
    It is being increasingly recognized that the Saussurean dictum of “the arbitrariness of the linguistic sign” is in conflict with the pervasiveness of the phenomenon commonly known as “sound symbolism”. After first presenting a historical overview of the debate, however, we conclude that both positions have been exaggerated, and that an adequate explanation of sound symbolism is still lacking. How can there, for example, be similarity between expressionsand contents across different sensory modalities? We offer an answer, based on the Peircian (...)
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  38.  16
    A SPoARC in the Dark: Spatialization in Verbal Immediate Memory.Alessandro Guida, Aurélie Leroux, Magali Lavielle-Guida & Yvonnick Noël - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):2108-2121.
    In 2011, van Dijck and Fias described a positional SNARC effect: the SPoARC. To-be-remembered items presented centrally on a screen seemed to acquire a left-to-right spatial dimension. If confirmed, this spatialization could be crucial for immediate memory theories. However, given the intricate links between visual and spatial dimensions, this effect could be due to the visual presentation, which could have probed the left-to-right direction of reading/writing. To allow a generalization of this effect, we adapted van Dijck and Fias's task using (...)
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  39.  5
    Sign Systems: The Dawn of Earliest Mankind.Aarne Ruben - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (229):41-54.
    The early Pleistocene hunt scene was instant: when an antelope jerked in the water edge, the first “drivers” of the hunt were already in motion; the moment of outburst after a long ambush lasted less than second. The sudden hunt movements were typical of every prey-abundant landscape since even earlier geological periods. The analysis of Laetoli footprints made by our evolutionary ancestors more than three millions years ago indicates that in a randomly chosen moment, the landscape was full of animals (...)
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  40.  3
    Masculine Men Articulate Less Clearly.Vera Kempe, David A. Puts & Rodrigo A. Cárdenas - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):461-475.
    In previous research, acoustic characteristics of the male voice have been shown to signal various aspects of mate quality and threat potential. But the human voice is also a medium of linguistic communication. The present study explores whether physical and vocal indicators of male mate quality and threat potential are linked to effective communicative behaviors such as vowel differentiation and use of more salient phonetic variants of consonants. We show that physical and vocal indicators of male threat potential, height (...)
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  41.  43
    Conditional Reasoning with Negations: Implicit and Explicit Affirmation or Denial and the Role of Contrast Classes.Walter Schroyens, Niki Verschueren, Walter Schaeken & Gery D'Ydewalle - 2000 - Thinking and Reasoning 6 (3):221 – 251.
    We report two studies on the effect of implicitly versus explicitly conveying affirmation and denial problems about conditionals. Recently Evans and Handley (1999) and Schroyens et al. (1999b, 2000b) showed that implicit referencing elicits matching bias: Fewer determinate inferences are made, when the categorical premise (e.g., B) mismatches the conditional's referred clause (e.g., A). Also, the effect of implicit affirmation (B affirms not-A) is larger than the effect of implicit denial (B denies A). Schroyens et al. hypothesised that this interaction (...)
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  42.  56
    Simplifying Reading: Applying the Simplicity Principle to Reading.Janet I. Vousden, Michelle R. Ellefson, Jonathan Solity & Nick Chater - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (1):34-78.
    Debates concerning the types of representations that aid reading acquisition have often been influenced by the relationship between measures of early phonological awareness (the ability to process speech sounds) and later reading ability. Here, a complementary approach is explored, analyzing how the functional utility of different representational units, such as whole words, bodies (letters representing the vowel and final consonants of a syllable), and graphemes (letters representing a phoneme) may change as the number of words that can be read (...)
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  43.  9
    Phonological status of interdental phones / in the Mapudungun spoken in the coastal area, Budi, Araucanía Region, Chile.Juan Héctor Painequeo Paillán, Gastón F. Salamanca Gutiérrez & Manuel Jesús Jiménez Mardones - 2018 - Alpha (Osorno) 46:111-128.
    Resumen Este artículo se ocupa del estatus fonético-fonológico de las consonantes interdentales, en el Mapudungun hablado en el sector costa de isla Huapi, IX Región de La Araucanía. Después del análisis de pares mínimos, cuantificación de los segmentos interdentales versus alveolares, y la consciencia fonológica de los hablantes encuestados, se pudo concluir la vigencia de estos segmentos en tanto fonos y en tanto fonemas. Es decir, en esta zona son fonemas.This article deals with the phonetic-phonological status of the interdental (...) ],, in the Mapudungun spoken in the Coastal area of the Huapi Island, IX Region of Araucania. After analyzing minimal pairs, quantification of interdental segments versus alveolar, and the phonological awareness of the assessed speakers, the validity of these segments could be concluded both as phones and as phonemes. That is to say,, are phonemes in this area. (shrink)
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  44.  40
    Baby Talk and the Emergence of First Words.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):517-518.
    Words denoting “mother” in baby talk and in languages usually include nasal sounds, supporting Falk's suggestion that infant nasalized demand vocalizations might have motivated a first word. The linguistic contrast between maternal terms and paternal terms, which favor oral consonants, and the simple phonetic patterns of parental terms in both baby talk and languages also suggest parental terms could have been first words.
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  45.  10
    Locus Equations and Pattern Recognition.Terrance M. Nearey - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):277-277.
    Although the relations between second formant (F2) onset and F2 vowel are extremely regular and contain important information about place of articulation of the voiced stops, they are not sufficient for its identification. Using quadratic discriminant analysis of a new data set, it is shown that F3 onset and F3 vowel can also contribute substantial additional information to help identify the consonants.
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  46.  26
    Effect of Retroflex Sounds on the Recognition of Hindi Voiced and Unvoiced Stops.Amita Dev - 2009 - AI and Society 23 (4):603-612.
    As development of the speech recognition system entirely depends upon the spoken language used for its development, and the very fact that speech technology is highly language dependent and reverse engineering is not possible, there is an utmost need to develop such systems for Indian languages. In this paper we present the implementation of a time delay neural network system (TDNN) in a modular fashion by exploiting the hidden structure of previously phonetic subcategory network for recognition of Hindi consonants. (...)
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  47.  13
    Morphophonemic Variation Among Kinamayo Dialects: A Case Study.Rennie Cajetas Saranza - 2014 - Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 6 (1).
    This study analyzes the morphophonemic variations among Kinamayo dialects. Purposeful sampling, in-depth interviews, sorting and classifying of words according to phonological and morphological structures in data analysis were used. Results revealed that the phonemic inventory of the Kinamayo dialects consisted of twenty segmental phonemes, fifteen consonants: /n/, /g/, /d/, /s/, /l/, /w/, /r/, /p/, /m/, /k/, /t/, /y/, /h/, /b/, /ŋ/; five basic vowels: /a/,/,/i/, /ɪ/, /u, /ʊ/; vowel lengthening: /a:/, /u:/ and three diphthongs: /aʊ/, /aɪ/, /ᴐɪ/. Consonant clusters (...)
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  48.  24
    Listening to Speech in the Dark.Robert E. Remez - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):281-282.
    This commentary questions the proposed resemblance between the auditory mechanisms of localization and those of the sensory registration of speech sounds. Comparative evidence, which would show that the neurophysiology of localization is adequate to the task of categorizing consonants, does not exist. In addition, Sussman et al. do not offer sensory or perceptual evidence to confirm the presence in humans of processes promoting phoneme categorization that are analogous to the neurophysiology of localization. Furthermore, the computational simulation of the linear (...)
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  49.  13
    Does Locus-Equation Linearity Really Matter in Consonant Perception?Lawrence Brancazio - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):261-261.
    This commentary focuses on the claim that perceptual demands have caused the linearity exhibited by locus equations. I discuss results of an experiment demonstrating that, contrary to Sussman et al.'s claims, locus equations do not have relevance for the perception of stop consonants. I therefore argue against the plausibility of the orderly output constraint.
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  50.  20
    Acoustic Correlates and Perceptual Cues in Speech.James R. Sawusch - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):283-284.
    Locus equations are supposed to capture a perceptual invariant of place of articulation in consonants. Synthetic speech data show that human classification deviates systematically from the predictions of locus equations. The few studies that have contrasted predictions from competing theories yield mixed results, indicating that no current theory adequately characterizes the perceptual mapping from sound to phonetic symbol.
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