Results for 'developmental temporalities'

999 found
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  1.  9
    China as a Complex Risk Society.Chang Kyung-Sup - 2017 - Temporalités. Revue de Sciences Sociales Et Humaines 26.
    This paper analyzes post-Mao China as a complex risk society in which social, economic, and ecological risk syndromes pertaining to highly diverse levels and systems of development are manifested simultaneously. Complex risk society is a theoretical extension of Ulrich Beck’s thesis on risk society, focusing on complex developmental temporalities that are pervasively symptomatic of rapidly but asymmetrically developing political economies. In my earlier study, Korea was defined as a complex risk society in which risk syndromes of developed, undeveloped, (...)
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  2.  99
    Human Nature and Cognitive–Developmental Niche Construction.Karola Stotz - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):483-501.
    Recent theories in cognitive science have begun to focus on the active role of organisms in shaping their own environment, and the role of these environmental resources for cognition. Approaches such as situated, embedded, ecological, distributed and particularly extended cognition look beyond ‘what is inside your head’ to the old Gibsonian question of ‘what your head is inside of’ and with which it forms a wider whole—its internal and external cognitive niche. Since these views have been treated as a radical (...)
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  3. The Proximate–Ultimate Distinction and Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Causal Irrelevance Versus Explanatory Abstraction.Massimo Pigliucci & Raphael Scholl - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):653-670.
    Mayr’s proximate–ultimate distinction has received renewed interest in recent years. Here we discuss its role in arguments about the relevance of developmental to evolutionary biology. We show that two recent critiques of the proximate–ultimate distinction fail to explain why developmental processes in particular should be of interest to evolutionary biologists. We trace these failures to a common problem: both critiques take the proximate–ultimate distinction to neglect specific causal interactions in nature. We argue that this is implausible, and that (...)
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  4. Typology Now: Homology and Developmental Constraints Explain Evolvability.Ingo Brigandt - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):709-725.
    By linking the concepts of homology and morphological organization to evolvability, this paper attempts to (1) bridge the gap between developmental and phylogenetic approaches to homology and to (2) show that developmental constraints and natural selection are compatible and in fact complementary. I conceive of a homologue as a unit of morphological evolvability, i.e., as a part of an organism that can exhibit heritable phenotypic variation independently of the organism’s other homologues. An account of homology therefore consists in (...)
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  5. Developmental Systems Theory.Paul Griffiths & Adam Hochman - 2015 - eLS:1-7.
    Developmental systems theory (DST) is a wholeheartedly epigenetic approach to development, inheritance and evolution. The developmental system of an organism is the entire matrix of resources that are needed to reproduce the life cycle. The range of developmental resources that are properly described as being inherited, and which are subject to natural selection, is far wider than has traditionally been allowed. Evolution acts on this extended set of developmental resources. From a developmental systems perspective, development (...)
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  6.  58
    Evolutionary Morphology, Innovation, and the Synthesis of Evolutionary and Developmental Biology.Alan C. Love - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):309-345.
    One foundational question in contemporarybiology is how to `rejoin evolution anddevelopment. The emerging research program(evolutionary developmental biology or`evo-devo) requires a meshing of disciplines,concepts, and explanations that have beendeveloped largely in independence over the pastcentury. In the attempt to comprehend thepresent separation between evolution anddevelopment much attention has been paid to thesplit between genetics and embryology in theearly part of the 20th century with itscodification in the exclusion of embryologyfrom the Modern Synthesis. This encourages acharacterization of evolutionary developmentalbiology as the (...)
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  7. Discussion: Three Ways to Misunderstand Developmental Systems Theory. [REVIEW]Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):417-425.
    Developmental systems theory (DST) is a general theoretical perspective on development, heredity and evolution. It is intended to facilitate the study of interactions between the many factors that influence development without reviving `dichotomous' debates over nature or nurture, gene or environment, biology or culture. Several recent papers have addressed the relationship between DST and the thriving new discipline of evolutionary developmental biology (EDB). The contributions to this literature by evolutionary developmental biologists contain three important misunderstandings of DST.
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  8. Developmental Phenotypic Plasticity: Where Internal Programming Meets the External Environment.Massimo Pigliucci - 1998 - Current Biology 1:87-91.
    Developmental plasticity as the nexus between genetics and ecology.
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  9.  39
    Are Developmental Disorders Like Cases of Adult Brain Damage? Implications From Connectionist Modelling.Michael Thomas & Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):727-750.
    It is often assumed that similar domain-specific behavioural impairments found in cases of adult brain damage and developmental disorders correspond to similar underlying causes, and can serve as convergent evidence for the modular structure of the normal adult cognitive system. We argue that this correspondence is contingent on an unsupported assumption that atypical development can produce selective deficits while the rest of the system develops normally (Residual Normality), and that this assumption tends to bias data collection in the field. (...)
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  10. Darwinism and Developmental Systems.Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray - 2001 - In Susan Oyama, Paul Griffiths, Gray E. & D. Russell (eds.), Cycles of Contingency: Developmental Systems and Evolution. MIT Press. pp. 195--218.
  11. How Similar Are Fluid Cognition and General Intelligence? A Developmental Neuroscience Perspective on Fluid Cognition as an Aspect of Human Cognitive Ability.Blair Clancy - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):109-125.
    This target article considers the relation of fluid cognitive functioning to general intelligence. A neurobiological model differentiating working memory/executive function cognitive processes of the prefrontal cortex from aspects of psychometrically defined general intelligence is presented. Work examining the rise in mean intelligence-test performance between normative cohorts, the neuropsychology and neuroscience of cognitive function in typically and atypically developing human populations, and stress, brain development, and corticolimbic connectivity in human and nonhuman animal models is reviewed and found to provide evidence of (...)
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  12.  67
    The Developmental Systems Perspective: Organism-Environment Systems as Units of Development and Evolution.Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray - 2002 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Katherine Preston (eds.), Phenotypic Integration: Studying the Ecology and Evolution of Complex Phenotypes. Oxford University Press. pp. 409.
    Developmental systems theory is an attempt to sum up the ideas of a research tradition in developmental psychobiology that goes back at least to Daniel Lehrman’s work in the 1950s. It yields a representation of evolution that is quite capable of accommodating the traditional themes of natural selection and also the new results that are emerging from evolutionary developmental biology. But it adds something else - a framework for thinking about development and evolution without the distorting dichotomization (...)
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  13. Developmental Systems Theory as a Process Theory.Paul Edmund Griffiths & Karola Stotz - forthcoming - In Daniel J. Nicholson & John Dupre (eds.), Everything Flows: Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 00-00.
    Griffiths and Russell D. Gray (1994, 1997, 2001) have argued that the fundamental unit of analysis in developmental systems theory should be a process – the life cycle – and not a set of developmental resources and interactions between those resources. The key concepts of developmental systems theory, epigenesis and developmental dynamics, both also suggest a process view of the units of development. This chapter explores in more depth the features of developmental systems theory that (...)
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  14.  9
    Ecological Developmental Biology: Interpreting Developmental Signs.Scott F. Gilbert - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (1):51-60.
    Developmental biology is a theory of interpretation. Developmental signals are interpreted differently depending on the previous history of the responding cell. Thus, there is a context for the reception of a signal. While this conclusion is obvious during metamorphosis, when a single hormone instructs some cells to proliferate, some cells to differentiate, and other cells to die, it is commonplace during normal development. Paracrine factors such as BMP4 can induce apoptosis, proliferation, or differentiation depending upon the history of (...)
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  15. A Developmental Systems Account of Human Nature.Karola Stotz & Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2018 - In Tim Lewens & Elizabeth Hannon (eds.), Why We Disagree About Human Nature. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 00-00.
    It is now widely accepted that a scientifically credible conception of human nature must reject the folkbiological idea of a fixed, inner essence that makes us human. We argue here that to understand human nature is to understand the plastic process of human development and the diversity it produces. Drawing on the framework of developmental systems theory and the idea of developmental niche construction we argue that human nature is not embodied in only one input to development, such (...)
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  16.  21
    Ephestia: The Experimental Design of Alfred Kühn's Physiological Developmental Genetics. [REVIEW]Hans-Jörg Rheinberger - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):535-576.
    Much of the early history of developmental and physiological genetics in Germany remains to be written. Together with Carl Correns and Richard Goldschmidt, Alfred Kühn occupies a special place in this history. Trained as a zoologist in Freiburg im Breisgau, he set out to integrate physiology, development and genetics in a particular experimental system based on the flour moth Ephestia kühniella Zeller. This paper is meant to reconstruct the crucial steps in the experimental pathway that led Kühn and his (...)
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  17. How Development Changes Evolution: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Stavros Ioannidis - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):567-578.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) is a new and rapidly developing field of biology which focuses on questions in the intersection of evolution and development and has been seen by many as a potential synthesis of these two fields. This synthesis is the topic of the books reviewed here. Integrating Evolution and Development (edited by Roger Sansom and Robert Brandon), is a collection of papers on conceptual issues in Evo-Devo, while From Embryology to Evo-Devo (edited by Manfred Laubichler and Jane (...)
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  18.  44
    Critical Notice: Cycles of Contingency – Developmental Systems and Evolution. [REVIEW]James Griesemer, Matthew H. Haber, Grant Yamashita & Lisa Gannett - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):517-544.
    The themes, problems and challenges of developmental systems theory as described in Cycles of Contingency are discussed. We argue in favor of a robust approach to philosophical and scientific problems of extended heredity and the integration of behavior, development, inheritance, and evolution. Problems with Sterelny's proposal to evaluate inheritance systems using his `Hoyle criteria' are discussed and critically evaluated. Additional support for a developmental systems perspective is sought in evolutionary studies of performance and behavior modulation of fitness.
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  19.  19
    Why Are There Developmental Stages in Language Learning? A Developmental Robotics Model of Language Development.Anthony F. Morse & Angelo Cangelosi - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):32-51.
    Most theories of learning would predict a gradual acquisition and refinement of skills as learning progresses, and while some highlight exponential growth, this fails to explain why natural cognitive development typically progresses in stages. Models that do span multiple developmental stages typically have parameters to “switch” between stages. We argue that by taking an embodied view, the interaction between learning mechanisms, the resulting behavior of the agent, and the opportunities for learning that the environment provides can account for the (...)
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  20.  50
    A Developmental Perspective on Moral Emotions.Tina Malti & Sebastian P. Dys - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):453-459.
    This article outlines a developmental approach to the study of moral emotions. Specifically, we describe our developmental model on moral emotions, one in which emotions and cognitions about morality get increasingly integrated and coordinated with development, while acknowledging inter-individual variation in developmental trajectories across the lifespan. We begin with a conceptual clarification of the concept of moral emotions. After a brief review of our own developmental approach to the study of moral emotions, we provide a selective (...)
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  21.  24
    Enhancing Research Ethics Review Systems in Egypt: The Focus of an International Training Program Informed by an Ecological Developmental Approach to Enhancing Research Ethics Capacity.Hillary Anne Edwards, Tamer Hifnawy & Henry Silverman - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):199-207.
    Recently, training programs in research ethics have been established to enhance individual and institutional capacity in research ethics in the developing world. However, commentators have expressed concern that the efforts of these training programs have placed ‘too great an emphasis on guidelines and research ethics review’, which will have limited effect on ensuring ethical conduct in research. What is needed instead is a culture of ethical conduct supported by national and institutional commitment to ethical practices that are reinforced by upstream (...)
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  22.  31
    The Use of Natural Kinds in Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Jessica Bolker - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (2):121-129.
    Evolutionary developmental biologists categorize many different kinds of things, from ontogenetic stages to modules of gene activity. The process of categorization—the establishment of “kinds”—is an implicit part of describing the natural world in consistent, useful ways, and has an essentially practical rather than philosophical basis. Kinds commonly serve one of three purposes: they may function (1) as practical tools for communication; (2) to support prediction and generalization; or (3) as a basis for theoretical discussions. Beyond the minimal requirement that (...)
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  23.  46
    DDS: Dynamics of Developmental Systems. [REVIEW]Evelyn Fox Keller - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):409-416.
    The acronym Developmental systems theory (DST) has been introduced into the literature on development in at least three different contexts in recent years – twice for DST, and before that, for Dynamical Systems Theory – and in all cases, to designate a new perspective for understanding development. Subtle but significant differences in argument and aims distinguish these uses, and confound the difficulty of saying just what DST is. My aim in this paper is to disambiguate these different terms – (...)
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  24.  45
    How to Be an Anti-Reductionist About Developmental Biology: Response to Laubichler and Wagner.Greg Frost-Arnold - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):75-91.
    Alexander Rosenberg recently claimed (1997) that developmental biology is currently being reduced to molecular biology. cite several concrete biological examples that are intended to impugn Rosenberg's claim. I first argue that although Laubichler and Wagner's examples would refute a very strong reductionism, a more moderate reductionism would escape their attacks. Next, taking my cue from the antireductionist's perennial stress on the importance of spatial organization, I describe one form an empirical finding that refutes this moderate reductionism would take. Finally, (...)
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  25. Developmental Systems Theory: What Does It Explain, and How Does It Explain It?Paul E. Griffiths & James G. Tabery - 2013 - In Richard M. Lerner & Janette B. Benson (eds.), Embodiment and Epigenesis: Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Understanding the Role of Biology Within the Relational Developmental System Part A: Philosophical, Theoretical, and Biological Dimensions. Elsevier. pp. 65--94.
     
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  26.  65
    Time, Change, and Sociocultural Communication.Thomas J. Bruneau - 2007 - Sign Systems Studies 35 (1-2):89-116.
    The temporal orientations of any sociocultural grouping are major factors comprising its central identity. The manner in which the past (memories), the present (perception), and the future (anticipation/expectation) are commonly articulated also concern cultural identity. The identity of a cultural group is altered by developmental changes in time keeping and related objective, scientific temporalities.Three modes of temporality, objective, narrative, and transcendental, congruent with different kinds of brain processes, are common throughout our planet. Objective temporality tends to alter and (...)
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  27. Introduction: What is Developmental Systems Theory?Susan Oyama, Paul Griffiths, Gray E. & D. Russell - 2001 - In Susan Oyama, Paul Griffiths, Gray E., D. Russell, Kim Sterelny, Robert Wilson & A. (eds.), Cycle of Contingency: Developmental Systems and Evolution. MIT Press.
     
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  28.  29
    Stages in the Development of a Model Organism as a Platform for Mechanistic Models in Developmental Biology: Zebrafish, 1970–2000.Robert Meunier - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):522-531.
    Model organisms became an indispensable part of experimental systems in molecular developmental and cell biology, constructed to investigate physiological and pathological processes. They are thought to play a crucial role for the elucidation of gene function, complementing the sequencing of the genomes of humans and other organisms. Accordingly, historians and philosophers paid considerable attention to various issues concerning this aspect of experimental biology. With respect to the representational features of model organisms, that is, their status as models, the main (...)
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  29.  48
    Introduction: Reassessing Developmental Systems Theory.Anouk Barberousse, Francesca Merlin & Thomas Pradeu - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):199-201.
    The Developmental Systems Theory (DST) presented by its proponents as a challenging approach in biology is aimed at transforming the workings of the life sciences from both a theoretical and experimental point of view (see, in particular, Oyama [1985] 2000; Oyama et al. 2001). Even though some may have the impression that the enthusiasm surrounding DST has faded in very recent years, some of the key concepts, ideas, and visions of DST have in fact pervaded biology and philosophy of (...)
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  30.  29
    The Inadvertent Emergence of a Phenomenological Perspective in the Philosophy of Cognitive Psychology and Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology.Michael W. Barclay - 2000 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):140-166.
    The phenomenological perspective described by M. Merleau-Ponty seems to be emerging in the context of contemporary developmental research, theories of communication, metaphor theory, and cognitive neuroscience. This emergence is not always accompanied by reference to Merleau-Ponty, however, or appropriate interpretation. On some cases, the emergence of the perspective seems rather inadvertent. The purpose of this essay is to ferret out some of the points which contemporary thinking has in common with Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology. Though it may appear that the examples (...)
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  31.  5
    Experiencing as Developmental Category: Learning From a Fisherman Who is Becoming a Teacher-in-a-Village-School.Thurídur Jóhannsdóttir & Wollf-Michael Roth - 2014 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 15 (3):54-78.
    In this study, we take up L. S. Vygotsky’s challenge to study learning and development in terms of categories, irreducible units that preserve the characteristics of the whole. One such category is experiencing [pereživanie], a process that integrates over the relation of person and environment. Using a case study from Iceland, we theorize the process of “becoming as a teacher-in-a-village school” in terms of experiencing [pereživanie]. The case describes a stage of development in the life of a person who becomes (...)
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  32.  5
    A Gramscian Perspective on Developmental Work Research: Contradictions, Power and the Role of Researchers Reconsidered.Tiina Kontinen - 2013 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 14 (2):106-129.
    The article presents a Gramscian reading of organisational interventions within the framework of developmental work research. Developmental work research is based on Engeström’s concepts of activity system and expansive learning cycle. It utilizes the theoretical vocabulary provided by Marx and Ilyenkov and is situated in the traditions of cultural-historical and critical research. In recent years, critical commentaries have pointed to a need to reconsider questions related to transformation, contradictions and power within the approach. The Gramscian reading here suggests (...)
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  33.  2
    After a Decade: What Remains of a Kindergarten Developmental Arts Education Project?Saila Nevanen, Antti Juvonen & Heikki Ruismäki - 2014 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 15 (3):4-21.
    This article focuses on the long-term impacts and effects of developmental work that began as an arts education project in Helsinki in 2000. Ten years later, five kindergarten leaders were interviewed to gather information about the impacts of the project. The aim was to determine the long-term effects of the project and examine in which ways the impact could still be seen in the daily work in kindergartens. We also explored the reasons and prerequisites for the impacts still showing, (...)
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  34. Dynamics and Indeterminism in Developmental and Social Processes.Alan Fogel, Maria C. D. P. Lyra & Jaan Valsiner (eds.) - 1997 - L. Erlbaum.
    One of the most profound insights of the dynamic systems perspective is that new structures resulting from the developmental process do not need to be planned in advance, nor is it necessary to have these structures represented in genetic or neurological templates prior to their emergence. Rather, new structures can emerge as components of the individual and the environment self-organize; that is, as they mutually constrain each other's actions, new patterns and structures may arise. This theoretical possibility brings into (...)
     
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  35.  17
    The Stage Question in Cognitive-Developmental Theory.Charles J. Brainerd - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):173.
  36.  76
    Homology in Comparative, Molecular, and Evolutionary Developmental Biology: The Radiation of a Concept.Ingo Brigandt - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Zoology (Molecular and Developmental Evolution) 299:9-17.
    The present paper analyzes the use and understanding of the homology concept across different biological disciplines. It is argued that in its history, the homology concept underwent a sort of adaptive radiation. Once it migrated from comparative anatomy into new biological fields, the homology concept changed in accordance with the theoretical aims and interests of these disciplines. The paper gives a case study of the theoretical role that homology plays in comparative and evolutionary biology, in molecular biology, and in evolutionary (...)
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  37. Understanding Other Minds Perspectives From Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience.Simon Baron-Cohen, Helen Tager-Flusberg & Donald J. Cohen - 2000
  38.  16
    Aristotle on Constitutive, Developmental, and Resultant Moral Luck.Nafsika Athanassoulis - forthcoming - In Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Psychology of Luck. Abington: Routledge. pp. 13-24.
    This chapter offers a definition of luck from Aristotle's Physics, considers how this definition of luck from the Physics relates to Aristotle's treatment of luck in his works on ethics and the good life, as well as how it compares with the modern understanding of moral luck.
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  39.  82
    How Molecular is Molecular Developmental Biology? A Reply to Alex Rosenberg's Reductionism Redux: Computing the Embryo. [REVIEW]Manfred D. Laubichler & Günter P. Wagner - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):53-68.
    This paper argues in defense of theanti-reductionist consensus in the philosophy ofbiology. More specifically, it takes issues with AlexRosenberg's recent challenge of this position. Weargue that the results of modern developmentalgenetics rather than eliminating the need forfunctional kinds in explanations of developmentactually reinforce their importance.
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  40.  11
    Expanding the Temporal Dimensions of Developmental Biology: The Role of Environmental Agents in Establishing Adult-Onset Phenotypes.Scott F. Gilbert - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (1):65-72.
  41.  62
    Historical Temporalities of Capital: An Anti-Historicist Perspective.Massimiliano Tomba - 2009 - Historical Materialism 17 (4):44-65.
  42.  20
    Unmodern Synthesis: Developmental Hierarchies and the Origin of Phenotypes.Richard Gawne, Kenneth Z. McKenna & H. Frederik Nijhout - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (1):1600265.
    The question of whether the modern evolutionary synthesis requires an extension has recently become a topic of discussion, and a source of controversy. We suggest that this debate is, for the most part, not about the modern synthesis at all. Rather, it is about the extent to which genetic mechanisms can be regarded as the primary determinants of phenotypic characters. The modern synthesis has been associated with the idea that phenotypes are the result of gene products, while supporters of the (...)
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  43.  6
    Von ‚Fehlanpassungen‘ und ‚metabolischen Ghettos‘: Zur Konzeptualisierung globaler Gesundheitsunterschiede im Feld der Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.Michael Penkler & Ruth Müller - 2018 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 41 (3):258-278.
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  44. Developmental Mechanisms.Alan Love - 2018 - In S. Glennan & P. Illari (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Mechanisms. New York: Routledge.
    The Routledge Handbook of Mechanisms and Mechanical Philosophy is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems, and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising over thirty chapters by a team of international contributors, the Handbook is divided into four Parts: -/- Historical perspectives on mechanisms The nature of mechanisms Mechanisms and the philosophy of science Disciplinary perspectives on mechanisms. -/- Within these Parts central topics and problems are examined, including the rise (...)
     
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  45.  29
    Associating, Mobilizing, Politicizing: Local Developmental Agency From Without. [REVIEW]László Bruszt & Balázs Vedres - 2013 - Theory and Society 42 (1):1-23.
  46.  62
    Developmental Theism: From Pure Will to Unbounded Love – by Peter Forrest. [REVIEW]Graham Oppy - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (4):549-553.
  47. Developmental Psychology: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives.Richard M. Lerner (ed.) - 1983 - L. Erlbaum Associates.
  48.  13
    Discrete-Trial Instrumental Performance Related to Reward Schedule and Developmental Level.Thomas J. Ryan, Christopher Orton & June B. Pimm - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (1):31.
  49.  9
    [The work of Richard Goldschmidt: an attempt at a synthesis of genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary theory surrounding the concept of homeosis].S. Schmitt - 1999 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):381-399.
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  50.  5
    Developmental Change in the Relative Values of Social and Non-Social Reinforcement.Michael Lewis, A. Martin Wall & Justin Aronfreed - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (2):133.
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