Results for 'forestry companies'

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  1.  16
    The Evolution of Corporate Social Responsiveness An Exploratory Study of Finnish and Canadian Forestry Companies.Juha Nasi, Salme Nasi, Nelson Phillips & Stelios Zyglidopoulos - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (3):296-321.
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  2.  26
    Managerial Views of Corporate Impacts and Dependencies on Ecosystem Services: A Case of International and Domestic Forestry Companies in China.D. D’Amato, M. Wan, N. Li, M. Rekola & A. Toppinen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1011-1028.
    A line of research is emerging investigating the private sector impacts and dependencies on critical biodiversity and ecosystem services, and related business risks and opportunities. While the ecosystem services narrative is being forwarded globally as a key paradigm for promoting business sustainability, there is scarce knowledge of how these issues are considered at managerial level. This study thus investigates managerial views of corporate sustainability after the ecosystem services concept. We analyse interviews conducted with 20 managers from domestic and international (...) companies operating with a plantation-based business model in China. Content analysis was employed to analyse the data, with a focus on four key areas: interviewee familiarity with the ecosystem services concept; their views of corporate dependencies and impacts on ecosystem services; related business risks and opportunities; and viability of existing instruments and practices that can be employed in detecting and addressing business impacts and dependencies on ecosystem services. Through an inductive approach to the empirical findings, we refined a framework that holds operational value for developing company response strategies to ecosystem services impact/dependence assessment, ensuring that all issues are addressed comprehensively, and that related risks and opportunities are properly acknowledged. (shrink)
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  3. The Evolution of Corporate Social Responsiveness: An Exploratory Study of Finnish and Canadian Forestry Companies.Juha Näsi, Salme Näsi, M. Phallus & Stelios Zyglidopoulos - 1997 - Business and Society 36:296-321.
     
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  4.  18
    Corporate Ethics and Indigenous People: Finnish Pulp Companies’ Role in the Land Conflicts of Northeastern Brazil.Susanna Myllylä & Tuomo Takala - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:282-288.
    Finland is currently undergoing a fundamental structural transformation in the forestry sector, with factories closing in the Global North and production being shifted to the Global South (see also Carrere & Lohmann 1996; Cossalter & Pye-Smith 2003). This is accompanied by Finnish mass movements protesting unemployment and demanding corporate social responsibility (CSR) from theforest industry. The difficult domestic situation, however, seems to overshadow the circumstances of the new production regions in the South. What do we actually know about the (...)
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  5.  44
    Managing Biodiversity Through Stakeholder Involvement: Why, Who, and for What Initiatives?Olivier Boiral & Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):403-421.
    The increasing pressures to conserve biodiversity—particularly for industries based on the exploitation of natural resources—have reinforced the need to implement specific measures in this area. Corporate commitment to preserving biodiversity is increasingly scrutinized by stakeholders and now represents an important aspect of business ethics. Although stakeholder involvement is often essential to the management of biodiversity, very few studies in the literature have focused on the details of this involvement. The objective of this paper is to analyze how mining and (...) companies can manage biodiversity issues through stakeholder involvement based on a content analysis of 430 sustainability reports using the Global Reporting Initiative framework. The paper elucidates the reasons for such involvement, the nature of stakeholders involved, and the types of measures employed to manage biodiversity. Stakeholders’ motives for becoming involved revolve around four main issues: complexity and knowledge management; self-regulation and relationships with public authorities; legitimacy and social responsiveness; and commercial and strategic objectives. The stakeholders involved in biodiversity initiatives are essentially non-governmental organizations, experts and universities, public authorities, and coalitions of companies. In the end, the initiatives identified can be grouped into three categories: management practices, socio-political actions, and research and conservation measures. The paper provides various examples of these initiatives and shows how they can be implemented in collaboration with different stakeholders depending on the company’s objectives. The contributions the study makes to the literature on biodiversity management and the managerial implications of the study are analyzed in the discussion section. (shrink)
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  6.  17
    Trayectoria de las relaciones entre empresas forestales y comunidades mapuche en Chile . Aportes para la reconstrucción etnográfica del desarrollo económico en contextos interétnicos.Noelia Carrasco - 2012 - Polis: Revista Latinoamericana 31.
    En los últimos quince años, en el territorio centro sur de Chile se evidencia una gama de situaciones que definen a las relaciones entre empresas forestales y comunidades mapuche a partir de principios de tensión, confrontación, atisbos de diálogo, e incluso, acuerdos de trabajo conjunto. En el marco de estos procesos, se ha puesto de manifiesto la plasticidad de los posicionamientos tanto de las comunidades, como también de las empresas que han debido situarse desde nuevas coordenadas jurídicas y ético – (...)
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  7.  59
    Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach.David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239-254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to Canada, (...)
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  8.  16
    Mapping Research Topics and Theories in Private Regulation for Sustainability in Global Value Chains.Antje Wahl & Gary Q. Bull - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (4):585-608.
    The globalization of production and trade has contributed to the rise in complex global value chains where the reach of state regulation is limited. As an alternative, private regulation, developed and administered by companies, industry associations, and nongovernmental organizations, has emerged to safeguard economic, environmental, and social sustainability in producer countries and along the value chain. The academic literature on private regulation in global value chains has grown over the last decade, but currently few major reviews of the research (...)
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  9.  20
    Cultural Competences: An Important Resource in the Industry–NGO Dialog.Maria Joutsenvirta & Liisa Uusitalo - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):379-390.
    This article explores the concept of cultural competence and its relevance as an organizational resource in ethical disputes. Empirically, we aim to reveal the cultural competences that a global forest industry company, StoraEnso, and a global environmental nongovernmental organization (NGO), Greenpeace, utilized in forestry conflicts during 1985–2001. Our study is based on data which were collected from corporate and NGO communication outlets and which have gone through a detailed discourse-semiotic analysis. Our reinterpretation of the discourses identified three cultural competences: (...)
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  10.  13
    Evolving Corporate Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Mysore Paper Mills Limited. [REVIEW]Alice Mani - 2014 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):41-56.
    In 1987, the World Commission on Economic Development popularized the term “sustainable development” in its well-cited report, Our Common Future. According to this report, sustainable development is defined as “the development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The WCED asserted that sustainable development required simultaneous adoption of environmental, economical, and equity principles. Bansal, 197–218, 2005) has conducted a study of Canadian firms in the oil and gas, mining, (...)
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  11.  11
    Global–Local Amazon Politics.AndrÈa Zhouri - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (2):69-89.
    The Amazon rainforest is one of the most important topics of transnational activism. Based on the assumption that the consumption of timber in the Northern hemisphere is largely responsible for deforestation, campaigners have focused on the global timber trade. From a strategy of boycotting tropical timber in the 1980s, environmentalists shifted their approach to one influenced by a discourse on ‘sustainable development’ in the 1990s. Believing that they could persuade loggers to use less predatory practices, the mainstream NGOs developed a (...)
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  12. Classical Proof Forestry.Willem Heijltjes - 2010 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 161 (11):1346-1366.
    Classical proof forests are a proof formalism for first-order classical logic based on Herbrand’s Theorem and backtracking games in the style of Coquand. First described by Miller in a cut-free setting as an economical representation of first-order and higher-order classical proof, defining features of the forests are a strict focus on witnessing terms for quantifiers and the absence of inessential structure, or ‘bureaucracy’.This paper presents classical proof forests as a graphical proof formalism and investigates the possibility of composing forests by (...)
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  13.  74
    Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. [REVIEW]Debra Z. Basil, Mary S. Runte, M. Easwaramoorthy & Cathy Barr - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):387 - 398.
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer's (2006, 'Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility', Harvard Business Review, 78-92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing (...)
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  14. Bad Company Tamed.Øystein Linnebo - 2009 - Synthese 170 (3):371 - 391.
    The neo-Fregean project of basing mathematics on abstraction principles faces “the bad company problem,” namely that a great variety of unacceptable abstraction principles are mixed in among the acceptable ones. In this paper I propose a new solution to the problem, based on the idea that individuation must take the form of a well-founded process. A surprising aspect of this solution is that every form of abstraction on concepts is permissible and that paradox is instead avoided by restricting what concepts (...)
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  15.  85
    Bad Company Generalized.Gabriel Uzquiano - 2009 - Synthese 170 (3):331 - 347.
    The paper is concerned with the bad company problem as an instance of a more general difficulty in the philosophy of mathematics. The paper focuses on the prospects of stability as a necessary condition on acceptability. However, the conclusion of the paper is largely negative. As a solution to the bad company problem, stability would undermine the prospects of a neo-Fregean foundation for set theory, and, as a solution to the more general difficulty, it would impose an unreasonable constraint on (...)
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  16.  56
    The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction.Wayne C. Booth - 1988 - University of California Press.
    Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature.
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  17.  69
    Do Company Ethics Training Programs Make a Difference? An Empirical Analysis.John Thomas Delaney & Donna Sockell - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (9):719 - 727.
    The authors analyze results of a survey of members of the Columbia University Graduate School of Business classes of 1953–1987 in order to assess the potential effectiveness of firms' ethics training programs. Results suggest that such training has a positive effect, but that relatively few firms provide such programs (about one-third of the respondents worked for firms with such programs). Although the sample is not representative of American employees and managers generally, the results suggest that it may be worthwhile for (...)
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  18.  29
    Company Delistings From the UN Global Compact: Limited Business Demand or Domestic Governance Failure? [REVIEW]Jette Steen Knudsen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):331-349.
    While a substantial amount of the literature describes corporate benefits of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, the literature is silent concerning why some companies announce CSR initiatives, yet fail to implement them. The article examines company delistings from the UN Global Compact. Delistings are surprising because the CSR agenda is seen as having won the battle of ideas. The analysis proceeds in two parts. I first analyze firm-level characteristics focusing on geography while controlling for sector and size; I find (...)
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  19.  18
    The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction.Richard Eldridge - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):98-100.
    In _The Company We Keep_, Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature. But the questions he asks are not confined to morality. Returning ethics to its root sense, Booth proposes that the ethical critic will be interested in any effect on the ethos, the total character or quality of tellers and listeners. Ethical criticism will risk talking about the quality of _this_ particular encounter with _this_ particular work. Yet it will (...)
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  20.  9
    Company–Community Agreements, Gender and Development.J. C. Keenan, D. L. Kemp & R. B. Ramsay - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):607-615.
    Company–community agreements are widely considered to be a practical mechanism for recognising the rights, needs and priorities of peoples impacted by mining, for managing impacts and ensuring that mining-derived benefits are shared. The use and application of company–community agreements is increasing globally. Notwithstanding the utility of these agreements, the gender dimensions of agreement processes in mining have rarely been studied. Prior research on women and mining demonstrates that women are often more adversely impacted by mining than men, and face greater (...)
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  21.  36
    Pharmaceutical Company Funding and its Consequences: A Qualitative Systematic Review.Sergio Sismondo - manuscript
    This article systematically reviews published studies of the association of pharmaceutical industry funding and clinical trial results, as well a few closely related studies. It reviews two earlier results, and surveys the recent literature. Results are clear: Pharmaceutical company sponsorship is strongly associated with results that favor the sponsors' interests.
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  22.  55
    Companies' Use of Whistle-Blowing to Detect Fraud: An Examination of Corporate Whistle-Blowing Policies. [REVIEW]Gladys Lee & Neil Fargher - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):283-295.
    In order to provide an effective whistle-blowing system, it is expected that companies would provide employees with a high level of disclosure regarding the whistle-blowing process. This study investigates variation in the extent of whistle-blowing disclosures. As a measure of whistle-blowing implementation, this study further examines the provision of a hotline channel. The results suggest that the extent of whistle-blowing disclosures is positively associated with the permissibility of anonymous reporting and organisational support for whistle-blowing, the number of external directors (...)
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  23.  27
    No Company is an Island. Sector-Related Responsibilities as Elements of Corporate Social Responsibility.Lisa Herzog - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):135-148.
    In this paper, I analyze the moral responsibili- ties that companies have with regard to the development of their sector, especially when there are path dependences that can lead sectors on more or less morally accept- able paths, e.g., with regard to market access for disad- vantaged groups. The interdependencies between companies in a sector are underexplored in the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR). Reflections on the normative status of profit-seeking and on the normative bases of CSR, (...)
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  24.  63
    Bad Company Objection to Joongol Kim’s Adverbial Theory of Numbers.Namjoong Kim - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3389-3407.
    Kim :1099–1112, 2013) defends a logicist theory of numbers. According to him, numbers are adverbial entities, similar to those denoted by “frequently” and “at 100 mph”. He even introduces new adverbs for numbers: “1-wise”, “2-wise”, and so on. For example, “Fs exist 2-wise” means that there are two Fs. Kim claims that, because we can derive Dedekind–Peano axioms from his definition of numbers as adverbial entities, it is a new form of logicism. In this paper, I will, however, argue that (...)
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  25. Strengthening Stakeholder–Company Relationships Through Mutually Beneficial Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives.C. B. Bhattacharya, Daniel Korschun & Sankar Sen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):257-272.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) continues to gain attention atop the corporate agenda and is by now an important component of the dialogue between companies and their stakeholders. Nevertheless, there is still little guidance as to how companies can implement CSR activity in order to maximize returns to CSR investment. Theorists have identified many company-favoring outcomes of CSR; yet there is a dearth of research on the psychological mechanisms that drive stakeholder responses to CSR activity. Borrowing from the literatures (...)
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  26.  35
    Exclusive Company: Only and the Dynamics of Vertical Inference.L. Horn - 1996 - Journal of Semantics 13 (1):1-40.
    The semantics of only says this: it asserts that no proposition from the set of relevant contrasts C other than the one expressed by its sister sentence α is true. There is in addition an implicature that α is in fact true. There is an industry devoted to the issue of whether the latter ingredient is an implicature (conversational or conventional), a presupposition, or part of the truth-conditions…For our purposes, we don't need to decide.
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  27.  48
    Pharmaceutical Companies Vs. The State: Who Is Responsible for Post-Trial Provision of Drugs in Brazil?Daniel Wei L. Wang & Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):188-196.
    This paper discusses the post-trial access to drugs for patients who participated in clinical trials in Brazil. The ethical guidance for clinical trials in Brazil is arguably one of the clearest in the world in attributing to research sponsors the responsibility for providing post-trial drugs to patients who participated in their experiments. The Federal Constitution recognizes health as a fundamental right to be fulfilled by the State. Based on the Brazilian constitution and on the National Health Council resolutions, courts have (...)
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  28.  4
    Forestry Experimental Stations: Russian Proposals of the 1870s.Anastasia Fedotova - 2014 - Centaurus 56 (4):254-274.
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  29.  7
    Forestry, the Arts and Value as Use.Dominic G. Hyde - 2003 - AQ 75 (1):13-16.
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  30.  11
    Great Planting Disasters: Pitfalls in Technical Assistance in Forestry[REVIEW]Louise Fortmann - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (1-2):49-60.
    Social forestry, in contrast to traditional forestry, is intended to meet biological/environmental, procedural and equity goals. Social forestry projects may not fulfill this multiplicity of goals either because priority is given to a single goal or because various factors including the structure and norms of implementing institutions and the distribution of local power overwhelm procedural and distributive intentions. Thus, despite participatory and equitable project designs, social forestry projects may result in the distribution of benefits to the (...)
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  31.  70
    Company Growth and Board Attitudes to Corporate Social Responsibility.Coral B. Ingley - 2008 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):17.
    Companies are beginning to recognise the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility as presenting a new business model and an opportunity for building innovative forms of competitive advantage. Boards are instrumental in shaping and overseeing such strategies and active engagement around what it means to be a responsible and responsive enterprise can strengthen the Board's potential as a strategic influence on long-term value creation. Yet many companies align with Friedman's contention that adopting and practising CSR is a distraction from (...)
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  32.  19
    Pharmaceutical Companies Vs. The State: Who is Responsible for Post-Trial Provision of Drugs in Brazil?Daniel Wei L. Wang & Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):188-196.
    This paper discusses so-called post-trial access to drugs for patients who participated in clinical trials in Brazil. Brazil is currently a relevant country for the pharmaceutical industry due to the dimensions of its actual and potential market. As a consequence, the number of pharmaceutical trials has been rising. It is the largest market for pharmaceutical companies in Latin America, the 8th biggest in the world and second only to China among the so-called BRICS’s emerging countries. The demand for pharmaceutical (...)
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  33.  33
    Green Companies or Green Con‐Panies: Are Companies Really Green, or Are They Pretending to Be?Monica Saha & Geoffrey Darnton - 2005 - Business and Society Review 110 (2):117-157.
  34.  33
    Pharmaceutical Companies and Global Lack of Access to Medicines: Strengthening Accountability Under the Right to Health.Anand Grover, Brian Citro, Mihir Mankad & Fiona Lander - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):234-250.
    Many medicines currently available on the market are simply too expensive for millions around the world to afford. Many medicines available in the developing world are only available to a small percentage of the population due to economic inequities. The profit-seeking behavior of pharmaceutical companies exacerbates this problem. In most cases, the price reductions required to make drugs affordable to a broader class of people in the developing world are not offset by the resultant increase in sales volume. Simply (...)
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  35.  24
    The Interdisciplinary Decision Problem : Popperian Optimism and Kuhnian Pessimism in Forestry.Johannes Persson, Henrik Thorén & Lennart Olsson - forthcoming - Ecology and Society 23 (3).
    Interdisciplinary research in the fields of forestry and sustainability studies often encounters seemingly incompatible ontological assumptions deriving from natural and social sciences. The perceived incompatibilities might emerge from the epistemological and ontological claims of the theories or models directly employed in the interdisciplinary collaboration, or they might be created by other epistemological and ontological assumptions that these interdisciplinary researchers find no reason to question. In this paper we discuss the benefits and risks of two possible approaches, Popperian optimism and (...)
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  36.  9
    Public Companies as Social Institutions.Janice Dean - 2001 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 10 (4):302–310.
    Many UK public companies invest considerable resources in charitable donations and community involvement. Using semi‐structured interviews with public company officers, the author sought to investigate the motivations behind this activity. Was it undertaken because of an expectation of commercial benefit, out of a sense of obligation, or for other reasons? It appeared that public companies were increasingly anxious to make connections between corporate activity in the community and business activities. Public companies linked with local communities clearly felt (...)
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  37.  13
    Green Companies or Green Con-Panies: Are Companies Really Green, or Are They Pretending to Be?Monica Saha & Geoffrey Darnton - 2005 - Business and Society Review 110 (2):117-157.
  38.  39
    Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating Among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
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  39. Building Forestry Rule Systems.K. Vongadow - 1988 - South African Journal of Philosophy-Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Wysbegeerte 7 (2):132-138.
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  40.  9
    Pharmaceutical Companies and Global Lack of Access to Medicines: Strengthening Accountability Under the Right to Health.Anand Grover, Brian Citro, Mihir Mankad & Fiona Lander - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):234-250.
    Approximately two billion people lack access to medicines globally. People living with HIV, cancer patients, those suffering from tuberculosis or malaria, and other populations in desperate need of life-saving medicines are increasingly unable to access existing preventative, curative, and life-prolonging treatments. In many cases, treatment may be unavailable or inaccessible for even some of the most common and readily treatable health concerns, such as hypertension. In the developing world, many of the factors that contribute to making the world’s most vulnerable (...)
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  41. Bad Company and Neo-Fregean Philosophy.Matti Eklund - 2009 - Synthese 170 (3):393-414.
    A central element in neo-Fregean philosophy of mathematics is the focus on abstraction principles, and the use of abstraction principles to ground various areas of mathematics. But as is well known, not all abstraction principles are in good standing. Various proposals for singling out the acceptable abstraction principles have been presented. Here I investigate what philosophical underpinnings can be provided for these proposals; specifically, underpinnings that fit the neo-Fregean's general outlook. Among the philosophical ideas I consider are: general views on (...)
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  42.  5
    The Balanced Company: A Theory of Corporate Integrity.Muel Kaptein - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a cohesive overview of the most important theories and insights in the field of business ethics. At the same time, it further tailors these theories to the situation in which organizations function, presenting criteria that can be used to measure, assess, improve and report on corporate integrity.
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  43.  61
    Un/Ethical Company and Brand Perceptions: Conceptualising and Operationalising Consumer Meanings. [REVIEW]Katja H. Brunk - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):551-565.
    Based on three empirical studies, this research sets out to conceptualise and subsequently operationalise the construct of consumer perceived ethicality (CPE) of a company or brand. Study 1 investigates consumer meanings of the term ethical and reveals that, contrary to philosophical scholars' exclusively consequentialist or nonconsequentialist positions, consumers' ethical judgments are a function of both these evaluation principles, illustrating that not any one scholarly definition of ethics alone is capable of capturing the content domain. The resulting conceptualisation identifies six key (...)
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  44.  31
    Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture.Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):617-631.
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis this paper (...)
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  45.  33
    Ancient Forestry Olli Makkonen: Ancient Forestry, an Historical Study. Part I: Facts and Information on Trees. Part Ii: The Procurement and Trade of Forest Products. (Acta Forestalia Fennica, 82, 95.) Pp. 84, 46. Helsinki: Akateeminen Kirjakauppa, 1967, 1969. Paper. [REVIEW]R. Meiggs - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (03):446-448.
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  46.  1
    Forestry and the Art of Frying Small Fish.D. Russell - 1998 - Environmental Values 7 (3):281-289.
    This paper is in the form of a narrative exploration of trees and woods. It embraces both the rational and the non-rational dimensions of experience, and mingles science with a little fancy. It begins by questioning some contemporary attitudes towards woods, then proceeds to consider how they function, it continues with some reflections on the cultural significance of trees and woods, and concludes with some ideas on the implications for woodland management.
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  47.  50
    Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds – Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99 - 129.
    >With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporations long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a companys long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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  48.  12
    Company Legitimacy in the New Millennium.Richard Warren - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (4):214–224.
    The relationship between business and society changes over time, and periodically there is a ‘legitimization crisis’. The paper will briefly explore some important questions about company legitimacy: why is company legitimacy important; why do legitimacy crises occur; and finally, are we in a crisis at the moment, and if so how can it be solved? The legal institutionalization of business firms prescribes narrow accountabilities and limited responsibilities: the challenge for business in the new millennium is to open these up and (...)
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    Corruption and Companies: The Use of Facilitating Payments.Antonio Argandoña - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):251-264.
    Making use of facilitating payments is a very widespread form of corruption. These consist of small payments or gifts made to a person – generally a public official or an employee of a private company – to obtain a favour, such as expediting an administrative process; obtaining a permit, licence or service; or avoiding an abuse of power. Unlike the worst forms of corruption, facilitating payments do not usually involve an outright injustice on the part of the payer as they (...)
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    Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds? Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99-129.
    With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporation's long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a company's long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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