Results for 'forgetting'

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  1. Forgetting.Matthew Frise - 2018 - In Kourken Michaelian, Dorothea Debus & Denis Perrin (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. Routledge. pp. 223-240.
    Forgetting is importantly related to remembering, evidence possession, epistemic virtue, personal identity, and a host of highly-researched memory conditions. In this paper I examine the nature of forgetting. I canvass the viable options for forgetting’s ontological category, type of content, characteristic relation to content, and scale. I distinguish several theories of forgetting in the philosophy and psychology of memory literatures, theories that diverge on these options. The best theories from the literature, I claim, fail two critical (...)
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  2.  30
    The Forgetting of Air in Martin Heidegger.Luce Irigaray - 1999 - University of Texas Press.
    French theorist Luce Irigaray has become one of the twentieth century's most influential feminist thinkers. Among her many writings are three books (with a projected fourth) in which she challenges the Western tradition's construals of human beings' relations to the four elements--earth, air, fire, and water--and to nature. In answer to Heidegger's undoing of Western metaphysics as a "forgetting of Being," Irigaray seeks in this work to begin to think out the Being of sexedness and the sexedness of Being. (...)
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  3.  32
    How Forgetting Aids Heuristic Inference.Lael J. Schooler & Ralph Hertwig - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):610-628.
    Some theorists, ranging from W. James to contemporary psychologists, have argued that forgetting is the key to proper functioning of memory. The authors elaborate on the notion of beneficial forgetting by proposing that loss of information aids inference heuristics that exploit mnemonic information. To this end, the authors bring together 2 research programs that take an ecological approach to studying cognition. Specifically, they implement fast and frugal heuristics within the ACT-R cognitive architecture. Simulations of the recognition heuristic, which (...)
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  4. “Forget Time”: Essay Written for the FQXi Contest on the Nature of Time.Carlo Rovelli - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (9):1475-1490.
    Following a line of research that I have developed for several years, I argue that the best strategy for understanding quantum gravity is to build a picture of the physical world where the notion of time plays no role at all. I summarize here this point of view, explaining why I think that in a fundamental description of nature we must “forget time”, and how this can be done in the classical and in the quantum theory. The idea is to (...)
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  5. Introspective Forgetting.Hans van Ditmarsch, Andreas Herzig, Jérôme Lang & Pierre Marquis - 2009 - Synthese 169 (2):405-423.
    We model the forgetting of propositional variables in a modal logical context where agents become ignorant and are aware of each others’ or their own resulting ignorance. The resulting logic is sound and complete. It can be compared to variable-forgetting as abstraction from information, wherein agents become unaware of certain variables: by employing elementary results for bisimulation, it follows that beliefs not involving the forgotten atom(s) remain true.
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  6. Responsibility for Forgetting.Samuel Murray, Elise D. Murray, Gregory Stewart, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (5):1177-1201.
    In this paper, we focus on whether and to what extent we judge that people are responsible for the consequences of their forgetfulness. We ran a series of behavioral studies to measure judgments of responsibility for the consequences of forgetfulness. Our results show that we are disposed to hold others responsible for some of their forgetfulness. The level of stress that the forgetful agent is under modulates judgments of responsibility, though the level of care that the agent exhibits toward performing (...)
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  7.  80
    Is Forgetting Reprehensible? Holocaust Remembrance and the Task of Oblivion.Björn Krondorfer - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):233-267.
    "Forgetting" plays an important role in the lives of individuals and communities. Although a few Holocaust scholars have begun to take forgetting more seriously in relation to the task of remembering—in popular parlance as well as in academic discourse on the Holocaust—forgetting is usually perceived as a negative force. In the decades following 1945, the terms remembering and forgetting have often been used antithetically, with the communities of victims insisting on the duty to remember and a (...)
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  8. The Epistemology of Forgetting.Kourken Michaelian - 2011 - Erkenntnis 74 (3):399-424.
    The default view in the epistemology of forgetting is that human memory would be epistemically better if we were not so susceptible to forgetting—that forgetting is in general a cognitive vice. In this paper, I argue for the opposed view: normal human forgetting—the pattern of forgetting characteristic of cognitively normal adult human beings—approximates a virtue located at the mean between the opposed cognitive vices of forgetting too much and remembering too much. I argue, first, (...)
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  9.  57
    Forgetting Your Scruples.Adam Bugeja - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (11):2889-2911.
    It can sound absurd to report that you have forgotten a moral truth. Described cases in which people who have lost moral beliefs exhibit the behavioural and phenomenological symptoms of forgetting can seem similarly absurd. I examine these phenomena, and evaluate a range of hypotheses that might be offered to explain them. These include the following proposals: that it is hard to forget moral truths because they are believed on the basis of intuition; that moral forgetting seems puzzling (...)
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  10. Sleeping Beauty and the Forgetful Bayesian.Bradley Monton - 2002 - Analysis 62 (1):47–53.
    Adam Elga takes the Sleeping Beauty example to provide a counter-example to Reflection, since on Sunday Beauty assigns probability 1/2 to H, and she is certain that on Monday she will assign probability 1/3. I will show that there is a natural way for Bas van Fraassen to defend Reflection in the case of Sleeping Beauty, building on van Fraassen’s treatment of forgetting. This will allow me to identify a lacuna in Elga’s argument for 1/3. I will then argue, (...)
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  11.  6
    Forgive, Forget or Regret? The Dao of Education in Times of Catastrophe.Ruyu Hung - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (13):1358-1363.
    Volume 52, Issue 13, December 2020, Page 1358-1363.
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  12. Forget and Forgive: A Practical Approach to Forgotten Evidence.Sinan Dogramaci - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    We can make new progress on stalled debates in epistemology if we adopt a new practical approach, an approach concerned with the function served by epistemic evaluations. This paper illustrates how. I apply the practical approach to an important, unsolved problem: the problem of forgotten evidence. Section 1 describes the problem and why it is so challenging. Section 2 outlines and defends a general view about the function of epistemic evaluations. Section 3 then applies that view to solve the problem (...)
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  13.  13
    Forget Evil: Autonomy, the Physician–Patient Relationship, and the Duty to Refer.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):313-317.
    Aulisio and Arora argue that the moral significance of value imposition explains the moral distinction between traditional conscientious objection and non-traditional conscientious objection. The former objects to directly performing actions, whereas the latter objects to indirectly assisting actions on the grounds that indirectly assisting makes the actor morally complicit. Examples of non-traditional conscientious objection include objections to the duty to refer. Typically, we expect physicians who object to a practice to refer, but the non-traditional conscientious objector physician refuses to refer. (...)
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  14. Forget Foucault.Jean Baudrillard & Sylvère Lotringer - 2007 - Semiotext(E).
  15. Forget About the Future: Effects of Thought Suppression on Memory for Imaginary Emotional Episodes.Nathan A. Ryckman, Donna Rose Addis, Andrew J. Latham & Anthony J. Lambert - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):200-206.
    Whether intentional suppression of an unpleasant or unwanted memory reduces the ability to recall that memory subsequently is a contested issue in contemporary memory research. Building on findings that similar processes are recruited when individuals remember the past and imagine the future, we measured the effects of thought suppression on memory for imagined future scenarios. Thought suppression reduced the ability to recall emotionally negative scenarios, but not those that were emotionally positive. This finding suggests that intentionally avoiding thoughts about emotionally (...)
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  16. Autobiographical Forgetting, Social Forgetting and Situated Forgetting.Celia B. Harris, John Sutton & Amanda Barnier - 2010 - In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Forgetting. Psychology Press. pp. 253-284.
    We have a striking ability to alter our psychological access to past experiences. Consider the following case. Andrew “Nicky” Barr, OBE, MC, DFC, (1915 – 2006) was one of Australia’s most decorated World War II fighter pilots. He was the top ace of the Western Desert’s 3 Squadron, the pre-eminent fighter squadron in the Middle East, flying P-40 Kittyhawks over Africa. From October 1941, when Nicky Barr’s war began, he flew 22 missions and shot down eight enemy planes in his (...)
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  17. Forget About the ‘Correspondence Theory of Truth’.David K. Lewis - 2001 - Analysis 61 (4):275–280.
    There is no distinct correspondence theory of truth, truth is correspondence to fact. If facts are taken to be true propositions, we wind up with just another version of the correspondence theory's ostensible competitor, the redundancy theory of truth. If instead facts are taken to be Armstrong's states of affairs, or Tractarian facts, or Mellor's _facta<D>, we get a _truthmaker<D> principle, that for every truth there is a truthmaker; something whose existence implies the proposition in question. Truthmaker principles are interesting (...)
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  18.  23
    Forgetting of Foreign‐Language Skills: A Corpus‐Based Analysis of Online Tutoring Software.Ridgeway Karl, C. Mozer Michael & R. Bowles Anita - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):924-949.
    We explore the nature of forgetting in a corpus of 125,000 students learning Spanish using the Rosetta Stone® foreign-language instruction software across 48 lessons. Students are tested on a lesson after its initial study and are then retested after a variable time lag. We observe forgetting consistent with power function decay at a rate that varies across lessons but not across students. We find that lessons which are better learned initially are forgotten more slowly, a correlation which likely (...)
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  19.  28
    Forget the Folk: Moral Responsibility Preservation Motives and Other Conditions for Compatibilism.Cory J. Clark, Bo M. Winegard & Roy F. Baumeister - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    For years, experimental philosophers have attempted to discern whether laypeople find free will compatible with a scientifically deterministic understanding of the universe, yet no consensus has emerged. The present work provides one potential explanation for these discrepant findings: People are strongly motivated to preserve free will and moral responsibility, and thus do not have stable, logically rigorous notions of free will. Seven studies support this hypothesis by demonstrating that a variety of logically irrelevant features influence compatibilist judgments. In Study 1, (...)
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  20.  64
    Forgetting and the Task of Seeing: Ordinary Oblivion, Plato, and Ethics.Jennifer R. Rapp - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):680-730.
    The gaps, fissures, and lapses of attention in a life—what I call “ordinary oblivions”—are fertile fragilities that present a compelling source for ethics. Plato, not Aristotle, is the ancient philosopher specially poised to speak to this feature of human life. Drawing upon poet C. K. Williams's idea that forgetting is a “looking away” that makes possible “beginning again,” I present a Platonic approach to ethics as an alternative to Aristotelian or virtue ethics. Plato's Phaedrus is a key source text (...)
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  21. On Forgetting the Difference Between Right and Wrong.G. Ryle - 1958 - In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press.
     
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  22. Forgetting Our Personal Past: Socially Shared Retrieval-Induced Forgetting of Autobiographical Memories.Charles Stone - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1084-1099.
    People often talk to others about their personal past. These discussions are inherently selective. Selective retrieval of memories in the course of a conversation may induce forgetting of unmentioned but related memories for both speakers and listeners (Cuc, Koppel, & Hirst, 2007). Cuc et al. (2007) defined the forgetting on the part of the speaker as within-individual retrieval-induced forgetting (WI-RIF) and the forgetting on the part of the listener as socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting (SS-RIF). However, (...)
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  23.  17
    Forget About the 'Correspondence Theory of Truth'.D. Lewis - 2001 - Analysis 61 (4):275-280.
  24.  14
    Introspective Forgetting.Hans Ditmarsch, Andreas Herzig, Jérôme Lang & Pierre Marquis - 2009 - Synthese 169 (2):405-423.
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  25. Catastrophic Forgetting in Connectionist Networks.R. French - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):128-135.
  26. On the Blameworthiness of Forgetting.Sven Bernecker - 2018 - In Dorothea Debus Kourken Michaelian (ed.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. London: Routledge. pp. 241-258.
    It is a mistake to think that we cannot be morally responsible for forgetting because, as a matter of principle, forgetting is outside of our control. Sometimes we do have control over our forgetting. When forgetting is under our control there is no question that it is the proper object of praise and blame. But we can also be morally responsible for forgetting something when it is beyond our control that we forget that thing. The (...)
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  27.  19
    Instructed Forgetting: Hypnotic and Nonhypnotic.John F. Kihlstrom - 1983 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 112 (1):73-79.
  28.  28
    Forgetfulness and Misology in Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy.Antonio Donato - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):463 - 485.
    In book one of the Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius is portrayed as a man who suffers because he forgot philosophy. Scholars have underestimated the significance of this portrayal and considered it a literary device the goal of which is simply to introduce the discussion that follows. In this paper, I show that this view is mistaken since it overlooks that this portrayal of Boethius is the key for the understanding of the whole text. The philosophical therapy that constitutes the core (...)
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  29.  54
    Forgetting and the Law of Disuse.J. A. McGeoch - 1932 - Psychological Review 39 (4):352-370.
  30. Forgetting Machines: Knowledge Management Evolution in Early Modern Europe.Alberto Cevolini - 2016 - Brill.
    _Forgetting Machines. Knowledge Management Evolution in Early Modern Europe_ investigates the evolution of scholarly practices and the transformation of cognitive habits in the early modern age, focussing on the development of note-taking systems and data storage devices.
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  31. Memory, History, Forgetting.Paul Ricoeur - 2004 - University of Chicago Press.
  32. Forgetting Fatness: The Violent Co-Optation of the Body Positivity Movement.Cheryl Frazier & Nadia Mehdi - 2021 - Debates in Aesthetics 16 (1):13-28.
    In this paper we track the ‘body positivity’ movement from its origins, promoting radical acceptance of marginalized bodies, to its co-optation as a push for self-love for all bodies, including those bodies belonging to socially dominant groups. We argue that the new focus on the ‘body positivity’ movement involves a single-minded emphasis on beauty and aesthetic adornment, and that this undermines the original focus of social and political equality, pandering instead to capitalism and failing to rectify unjust institutions and policies. (...)
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  33.  10
    Forgetting in Immediate Serial Recall: Decay, Temporal Distinctiveness, or Interference?Klaus Oberauer & Stephan Lewandowsky - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (3):544-576.
  34.  16
    Directed Forgetting of Recently Recalled Autobiographical Memories.Amanda J. Barnier, Martin A. Conway, Lyndel Mayoh, Joanne Speyer, Orit Avizmil & Celia B. Harris - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (2):301-322.
  35. Forgetting Souls: Lyotard, Adorno, and the Trope of the Jew.Eric Chalfant - 2018 - Critical Research on Religion 6 (1):54-68.
    In this article, I engage in a criticism of Jean François Lyotard’s tropological approach to Judaism, arguing that his articulation of the “the jew” as figural projection serves to establish and rigidify a number of freighted binaries such as those between reason and myth, philosophy and theology, and modern and postmodern. In comparison, I posit Theodor Adorno’s approach to tropes of Judaism as one which encompasses Lyotard’s productive emphases on the role of forgetting in subject formation while loosening these (...)
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  36.  44
    Willed Forgetfulness: The Arts, Education and the Case for Unlearning.John Baldacchino - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):415-430.
    Established scholarship in arts education is invariably related to theories of development founded on notions of multiple intelligence and experiential learning. Yet when contemporary arts practice is retraced on a philosophical horizon, one begins to engage with other cases for learning. This state of affairs reveals art’s inherent paradox where the expectation of learning is substituted by forms of unlearning. This paper begins to approach unlearning through the tension between art and education, and more specifically through the dialectical relationship between (...)
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  37. Forgetting Ourselves: Epistemic Costs and Ethical Concerns in Mindfulness Exercises.Sahanika Ratnayake & David Merry - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (8):567-574.
    Mindfulness exercises are presented as being compatible with almost any spiritual, religious or philosophical beliefs. In this paper, we argue that they in fact involve imagining and conceptualising rather striking and controversial claims about the self, and the self’s relationship to thoughts and feelings. For this reason, practising mindfulness exercises is likely to be in tension with many people’s core beliefs and values, a tension that should be treated as a downside of therapeutic interventions involving mindfulness exercises, not unlike a (...)
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  38.  12
    Forgetting in Social Chains: The Impact of Cognition on Information Propagation.Jose Drost-Lopez & Alin Coman - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (3-4):390-409.
    Listening to a speaker selectively practicing previously encoded information leads to better memory for the practiced information, but at the same time results in induced forgetting of related memories. These effects have been found to occur due to the concurrent, and covert, retrieval of information on the part of the listener. Using a modified version of the method of serial reproduction, this study explored the degree to which rehearsal and retrieval-induced forgetting effects propagated in 64 3-person-chains of connected (...)
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  39.  14
    Cued Forgetting in Short-Term Memory: Response Selection.David G. Elmes, Carl Adams & Henry L. Roediger - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):103.
  40.  33
    Forgetting Dreams.D. M. Johnson - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):407 - 414.
    It is a familiar fact that dreams are hard to recall. Because of this, memory alone is not a reliable indication of what they are like. Consider the following examples. Some people claim that they never dream. The truth is, psychologists assure us, that they do not remember having dreamt. Researchers say that they can tell when someone is dreaming, by his rapid eye movements and a certain pattern of brain waves recorded on an electroencephalograph . When a sleeper's eyes (...)
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  41. Forgetting Fatness: The Violent Co-Optation of the Body Positivity Movement.Cheryl Frazier & Nadia Mehdi - forthcoming - Debates in Aesthetics.
    In this paper we track the ‘body positivity’ movement from its origins, promoting radical acceptance of marginalized bodies, to its co-optation as a push for self-love for all bodies, including those bodies belonging to socially dominant groups. We argue that the new focus on the ‘body positivity’ movement involves a single-minded emphasis on beauty and aesthetic adornment, and that this undermines the original focus of social and political equality, pandering instead to capitalism and failing to rectify unjust institutions and policies. (...)
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  42.  21
    Not Forgetting Sex: Simon on Gender Equality.Pam R. Sailors - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (1):75-82.
  43. We Remember, We Forget: Collaborative Remembering in Older Couples.Celia B. Harris, Paul Keil, John Sutton, Amanda Barnier & Doris McIlwain - 2011 - Discourse Processes 48 (4):267-303.
    Transactive memory theory describes the processes by which benefits for memory can occur when remembering is shared in dyads or groups. In contrast, cognitive psychology experiments demonstrate that social influences on memory disrupt and inhibit individual recall. However, most research in cognitive psychology has focused on groups of strangers recalling relatively meaningless stimuli. In the current study, we examined social influences on memory in groups with a shared history, who were recalling a range of stimuli, from word lists to personal, (...)
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  44. Knowledge Forgetting: Properties and Applications.Yan Zhang & Yi Zhou - 2009 - Artificial Intelligence 173 (16-17):1525-1537.
  45.  31
    "Forget About It": "Parallel Processing" in the Srebrenica Report.Eelco Runia - 2004 - History and Theory 43 (3):295–320.
    Dominick LaCapra has remarked that “when you study something, you always have a tendency to repeat the problems you are studying.” In psychoanalytic supervision this phenomenon is called “parallel processing.” Parallel processes are subconscious re-enactments of past events: when you are caught up in a parallel process, your behavior repeats key aspects of what there is to know about what you’re studying—in a way, however, that you yourself don’t understand. This article analyzes the extent to which the “NIOD Report,” the (...)
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  46. Forget the Virtual: Bergson, Actualism, and the Refraction of Reality. [REVIEW]John Mullarkey - 2004 - Continental Philosophy Review 37 (4):469-493.
    In this essay I critique a particular reading of Bergson that places an excessive weight on the concept of the ‘virtual’. Driven by the popularity of Deleuze’s use of the virtual, this image of Bergson (seen especially through his text of 1896, Matter and Memory, where the idea is introduced) generates an imbalance that fails to recognise the importance of concepts of actuality, like space or psychology, in his other works. In fact, I argue that the virtual is not the (...)
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  47.  54
    Forgetting Morality: Reflections on a Theme in Chuang Tzu.Antonio S. Cua - 1977 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):305-328.
  48.  21
    4 Forgetting in Memory Models.Gordon Da Brown & Stephan Lewandowsky - 2010 - In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Forgetting. Psychology Press.
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  49. Forgetting Memory Skepticism.Matthew Frise & Kevin McCain - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (2):253-263.
    Memory skepticism denies our memory beliefs could have any notable epistemic good. One route to memory skepticism is to challenge memory’s epistemic trustworthiness, that is, its functioning in a way necessary for it to provide epistemic justification. In this paper we develop and respond to this challenge. It could threaten memory in such a way that we altogether lack doxastic attitudes. If it threatens memory in this way, then the challenge is importantly self-defeating. If it does not threaten memory in (...)
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  50.  15
    The Forgetting of the Penetrable Body: Simone de Beauvoir, Silence, Omission in Jacques Derrida.Norman Roland Madarasz - 2017 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 62 (3):835.
    Jacques Derrida é conhecido por suas tentativas a incluir a perspectiva da mulher no seu trabalho filosófico. Seus esforços receberam o elogio de filósofas, apesar do fato de sua filosofia permanecer marcada pela omissão de qualquer menção ao trabalho de Simone de Beauvoir. O assunto deste artigo não será a mulher, como na conferência de 1972 Esporas, mas o falogocentrismo. Ou seja, a economia, dinâmica e os limites deste conceito enquanto crítica da história, isto é, a história da mentira, termo (...)
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