Results for 'ganglion'

22 found
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  1.  33
    Exploring Wavelet Transforms for Morphological Differentiation Between Functionally Different Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells.H. F. Jelinek, R. M. Cesar & J. J. G. Leandro - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (1):67-90.
    Cognition or higher brain activity is sometimes seen as a phenomenon greater than the sum of its parts. This viewpoint however is largely dependent on the state of the art of experimental techniques that endeavor to characterize morphology and its association to function. Retinal ganglion cells are readily accessible for this work and we discuss recent advances in computational techniques in identifying novel parameters that describe structural attributes possibly associated with specific function. These parameters are based on calculating wavelet (...)
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  2.  91
    20 Origins of Perception: Retinal Ganglion Cell Diversity and the Creation of Parallel Visual Pathways.Dennis Dacey - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press. pp. 281.
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  3. Concomitant Compressive Neuropathy of the Ulnar and Median Nerves in the Hand by Midpalmar Ganglion.Daniel A. Osei, Ariel A. Williams & Andrew J. Weiland - 2012 - In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. MIT Press. pp. 1--3.
     
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  4.  12
    A Study of the Neurofibrils in the Ganglion Cells of the Cerebral Cortex.George V. N. Dearborn - 1901 - Psychological Review 8 (6):650-651.
  5. Die Physiologie des Trigeminus nach Untersuchungen am Menschen, bei denen das Ganglion Gasseri entfernt worden ist.No Authorship Indicated - 1896 - Psychological Review 3 (3):347-347.
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  6. Exploring the Structure–Function Relationship of Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells Using Wavelets.H. Jelinek, R. M. Cesar Jr & J. J. G. Leandro - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (1):67-90.
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  7. Selective Visual Attention and Perceptual Coherence.John T. Serences & Steven Yantis - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):38-45.
  8.  53
    La théorie cérébrale d'un naturaliste spiritualiste, Henri-Marie Ducrotay de Blainville.Laurent Clauzade - 2012 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 65 (2):237-257.
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  9.  54
    Photons, Clocks, and Consciousness.George C. Brainard & John P. Hanifin - 2005 - Journal of Biological Rhythms 20 (4):314-325.
  10.  18
    Contextual Regularity and Complexity of Neuronal Activity: From Stand‐Alone Cultures to Task‐Performing Animals.A. Ayali, E. Fuchs, Y. Zilberstein, A. Robinson, O. Shefi, E. Hulata, I. Baruchi & E. Ben-Jacob - 2004 - Complexity 9 (6):25-32.
  11.  15
    B-Afferents: A Fundamental Division of the Nervous System Mediating Homeostasis?James C. Prechtl & Terry L. Powley - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):289-300.
    The peripheral nervous system has classically been separated into a somatic division composed of both afferent and efferent pathways and an autonomic division containing only efferents. J. N. Langley, who codified this asymmetrical plan at the beginning of the twentieth century, considered different afferents, including visceral ones, as candidates for inclusion in his concept of the “autonomic nervous system”, but he finally excluded all candidates for lack of any distinguishing histological markers. Langley's classification has been enormously influential in shaping modern (...)
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  12.  6
    The Autonomic Nervous System as a Factor in the Psychogalvanic Reflex.W. D. O'Leary - 1932 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (6):767.
  13. Liberal Representationalism: A Deflationist Defense.Marc Artiga - 2016 - Dialectica 70 (3):407-430.
    The idea that only complex brains can possess genuine representations is an important element in mainstream philosophical thinking. An alternative view, which I label ‘liberal representationalism’, holds that we should accept the existence of many more full-blown representations, from activity in retinal ganglion cells to the neural states produced by innate releasing mechanisms in cognitively unsophisticated organisms. A promising way of supporting liberal representationalism is to show it to be a consequence of our best naturalistic theories of representation. However, (...)
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  14.  32
    Why is There No Successful Whole Brain Simulation (Yet)?Klaus M. Stiefel & Daniel S. Brooks - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (2):122-130.
    With the advent of powerful parallel computers, efforts have commenced to simulate complete mammalian brains. However, so far none of these efforts has produced outcomes close to explaining even the behavioral complexities of animals. In this article, we suggest four challenges that ground this shortcoming. First, we discuss the connection between hypothesis testing and simulations. Typically, efforts to simulate complete mammalian brains lack a clear hypothesis. Second, we treat complications related to a lack of parameter constraints for large-scale simulations. To (...)
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  15.  26
    Central Inhibitory Dysfunctions: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications.Z. Wiesenfeld-Hallin, H. Aldskogius, G. Grant, J.-X. Hao, T. Hökfelt & X.-J. Xu - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):420-425.
    Injury to the central or peripheral nervous system is often associated with persistent pain. After ischemic injury to the spinal cord, rats develop severe mechanical allodynia-like symptoms, expressed as a pain-like response to innocuous stimuli. In its short-lasting phase the allodynia can be relieved with the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist baclofen, which also reverses the hyperexcitability of dorsal horn interneurons to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is a reduction in GABA immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of allodynic rats. Clinical neuropathic (...)
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  16. Mathematical Model and Simulation of Retina and Tectum Opticum of Lower Vertebrates.U. Heiden & G. Roth - 1987 - Acta Biotheoretica 36 (3).
    The processing of information within the retino-tectal visual system of amphibians is decomposed into five major operational stages, three of them taking place in the retina and two in the optic tectum. The stages in the retina involve (i) a spatially local high-pass filtering in connection to the perception of moving objects, (ii) separation of the receptor activity into ON- and OFF-channels regarding the distinction of objects on both light and dark backgrounds, (iii) spatial integration via near excitation and far-reaching (...)
     
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  17.  35
    Parallel Visual Pathways From the Retina to the Visual Cortex – How Do They Fit?Luiz Carlos L. Silveira - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):50-51.
    Which roles are played by subcortical pathways in models of cortical streams for visual processing? Through their thalamic relays, magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) projecting ganglion cells send complementary signals to V1, where their outputs are combined in several different ways. The synergic role of M and P cells in vision can be understood by estimating cell response entropy in all domains of interest.
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  18.  17
    Morphological Hopfield Networks.Luciano Fontoura Costdaa - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (1):91-105.
    This paper reports on the investigation of the effects of neuronal shape, at both individual cell and network level, on the behavior of neuronal systems. More specifically, two-dimensional biologically realistic neuronal networks are obtained that take explicity into account the position and morphology of neuronal cells, with the respective behavior for associative recall being simulated through a diluted version of Hopfield's model. While a specific probability density function is used for the placement of the cell bodies, images of real neuronal (...)
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  19.  12
    Lessons on Transplant Survival From a Successful Model System.Stacia B. Moffett - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):63-63.
    Studies on the snailMelampusreveal that connectivity is crucial to the survival of transplanted ganglia. Transplanted CNS ganglia can innervate targets or induce supernumerary structures. Neuron survival is optimized by the neural incorporation that occurs when a transplanted ganglion is substituted for an excised ganglion. Better provision for the trophic requirements of neurons will improve the success of mammalian fetal transplants.
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  20.  21
    Morphological Hopfield Networks.Luciano Fontoura Costdaa, Marconi Soares Barbosa, Vincent Coupez & Dietrich Stauffer - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (1):91-105.
    This paper reports on the investigation of the effects of neuronal shape, at both individual cell and network level, on the behavior of neuronal systems. More specifically, two-dimensional biologically realistic neuronal networks are obtained that take explicity into account the position and morphology of neuronal cells, with the respective behavior for associative recall being simulated through a diluted version of Hopfield's model. While a specific probability density function is used for the placement of the cell bodies, images of real neuronal (...)
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  21.  8
    Role of Capsaicin-Sensitive Afferent Nerves in Initiation and Maintenance of Pathological Pain.Gábor Jancsó, Mária Dux & Péter Sántha - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):454-455.
    This commentary provides experimental data in support of the critical role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers in the initiation and maintenance of pathological pain. The demonstration of capsaicin-induced, centrally-evoked cutaneous hyperalgesia, and of neuroplastic changes elicited by the degeneration of C-fiber primary afferent terminals following peripheral nerve damage, indicates a significant contribution of capsaicin-sensitive sensory ganglion neurons in the development of pathological pain conditions. [coderre & katz].
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  22.  3
    Mathematical Model and Simulation of Retina and Tectum Opticum of Lower Vertebrates.U. An der Heiden & G. Roth - 1987 - Acta Biotheoretica 36 (3):179-212.
    The processing of information within the retino-tectal visual system of amphibians is decomposed into five major operational stages, three of them taking place in the retina and two in the optic tectum. The stages in the retina involve a spatially local high-pass filtering in connection to the perception of moving objects, separation of the receptor activity into ON- and OFF-channels regarding the distinction of objects on both light and dark backgrounds, spatial integration via near excitation and far-reaching inhibition. Variation of (...)
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