Results for ' hippocampus'

272 found
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  1.  64
    Hippocampus, space, and memory.David S. Olton, James T. Becker & Gail E. Handelmann - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):313-322.
    We examine two different descriptions of the behavioral functions of the hippocampal system. One emphasizes spatially organized behaviors, especially those using cognitive maps. The other emphasizes memory, particularly working memory, a short-term memory that requires iexible stimulus-response associations and is highly susceptible to interference. The predictive value of the spatial and memory descriptions were evaluated by testing rats with damage to the hippocampal system in a series of experiments, independently manipulating the spatial and memory characteristics of a behavioral task. No (...)
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  2.  28
    Active hippocampus during nonconscious memories.Katharina Henke, Valerie Treyer, Eva Turi Nagy, Stefan Kneifel, Max Dürsteler, Roger M. Nitsch & Alfred Buck - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):31-48.
    The hippocampal formation is known for its importance in conscious, declarative memory. Here, we report neuroimaging evidence in humans for an additional role of the hippocampal formation in nonconscious memory. We maskedly presented combinations of faces and written professions such that subjects were not aware of them. Nevertheless, the masked presentations activated many of the brain regions that unmasked presentations of these stimuli did. To induce a nonconscious retrieval of the faces and face-associated occupational information, subjects were instructed to view (...)
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  3.  44
    Associations across time: The hippocampus as a temporary memory store.J. N. P. Rawlins - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):479-497.
    All recent memory theories of hippocampal function have incorporated the idea that the hippocampus is required to process items only of some qualitatively specifiahle kind, and is not required to process items of some complementary set. In contrast, it is now proposed that the hippocampus is needed to process stimuli of all kinds, but only when there is a need to associate those stimuli with other events that are temporally discontiguous. In order to form or use temporally discontiguous (...)
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  4. The hippocampus: hub of brain network communication for memory.Francesco P. Battaglia, Karim Benchenane, Anton Sirota, Cyriel M. A. Pennartz & Sidney I. Wiener - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):310-318.
    A complex brain network, centered on the hippocampus, supports episodic memories throughout their lifetimes. Classically, upon memory encoding during active behavior, hippocampal activity is dominated by theta oscillations (6-10Hz). During inactivity, hippocampal neurons burst synchronously, constituting sharp waves, which can propagate to other structures, theoretically supporting memory consolidation. This 'two-stage' model has been updated by new data from high-density electrophysiological recordings in animals that shed light on how information is encoded and exchanged between hippocampus, neocortex and subcortical structures (...)
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  5.  26
    The hippocampus seen in the context of declarative and procedural control.Frederick Toates - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):771-772.
    Various apparently incompatible theories of hippocampal function have been proposed but integration is now needed. It is argued that the involvement of the hippocampus is most clearly seen when the animal needs to extrapolate beyond current sensory information. Such control can involve both the initiation of behaviour in the absence of appropriate sensory input and the inhibition of behaviour that might otherwise be triggered by current sensory input.
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  6.  45
    Memory and the hippocampus: A synthesis from findings with rats, monkeys, and humans.Larry R. Squire - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):195-231.
  7. The role of the hippocampus in flexible cognition and social behavior.Rachael D. Rubin, Patrick D. Watson, Melissa C. Duff & Neal J. Cohen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8:104150.
    Successful behavior requires actively acquiring and representing information about the environment and people, and manipulating and using those acquired representations flexibly to optimally act in and on the world. The frontal lobes have figured prominently in most accounts of flexible or goal-directed behavior, as evidenced by often-reported behavioral inflexibility in individuals with frontal lobe dysfunction. Here, we propose that the hippocampus also plays a critical role by forming and reconstructing relational memory representations that underlie flexible cognition and social behavior. (...)
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  8.  43
    The hippocampus: A manifesto for change.Eleanor A. Maguire & Sinéad L. Mullally - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1180.
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  9.  22
    The hippocampus and path integration.Ian Q. Whishaw - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):467-467.
    Recent studies of the contribution made by the hippocampus to spatial behavior suggest that it plays a role in integrating and double integrating distance and direction information using cues generated by self-movement. This and other evidence that the hippocampus plays a central role in spatial behavior seems inconsistent with proposals that it is primarily involved in episodic memory.
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  10.  14
    The hippocampus and spatial constraints on mental imagery.Chris M. Bird, James A. Bisby & Neil Burgess - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  11.  75
    Précis of O'Keefe & Nadel's The hippocampus as a cognitive map.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):487-494.
    Theories of spatial cognition are derived from many sources. Psychologists are concerned with determining the features of the mind which, in combination with external inputs, produce our spatialized experience. A review of philosophical and other approaches has convinced us that the brain must come equipped to impose a three-dimensional Euclidean framework on experience – our analysis suggests that object re-identification may require such a framework. We identify this absolute, nonegocentric, spatial framework with a specific neural system centered in the (...).A consideration of the kinds of behaviours in which such a spatial mapping system would be important is followed by an analysis of the anatomy and physiology of this system, with special emphasis on the place-coded neurons recorded in the hippocampus of freely moving rats. A tentative physiological model for the hippocampal cognitive map is proposed. A review of lesion studies, in tasks as diverse as discrimination learning, avoidance, and extinction, shows that the cognitive map notion can adequately explain much of the data.The model is extended to humans by the assumption that spatial maps are built in one hemisphere, semantic maps in the other. The latter provide a semantic deep structure within which discourse comprehension and production can be achieved. Evidence from the study of amnesic patients, briefly reviewed, is consistent with this extension. (shrink)
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  12.  38
    How the Hippocampus Represents Memories: Making Sense of Memory Allocation Studies.Thiago F. A. França & José M. Monserrat - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (11):800068.
    In recent years there has been a wealth of studies investigating how memories are allocated in the hippocampus. Some of those studies showed that it is possible to manipulate the identity of neurons recruited to represent a given memory without affecting the memory's behavioral expression. Those findings raised questions about how the hippocampus represents memories, with some researchers arguing that hippocampal neurons do not represent fixed stimuli. Herein, an alternative hypothesis is argued. Neurons in high‐order brain regions can (...)
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  13.  14
    Are hippocampus and superior colliculus more related to each other than to other brain structures?J. Bureš & O. Burešová - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):120-121.
  14.  11
    The hippocampus, behavioral optimization, and working memory.L. S. Gambarian - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):329-330.
  15.  20
    Hippocampus, delay neurons, and sensory heterogeneity.Michael Colombo & Charles G. Gross - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):766-767.
    We raise three issues concerning the Eichenbaum, Otto & Cohen (1994) model. (1) We argue against the strict division of labor that Eichenbaum et al. attribute to neocortical and limbic regions. (2) We raise the possibility that the anterior and posterior portions of the hippocampus may be important for different types of information processing. (3) We argue that, rather than reflecting relational processing, different neural responses to “match” and “nonmatch” trials may relate to different required spatial responses.
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  16.  2
    Hippocampus, maps, and memory: toward a rapprochement.Arthur J. Nonneman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):339-339.
  17.  15
    Hippocampus, space, and relations.Lynn Nadel - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):490-491.
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  18.  20
    The hippocampus is not a geometric module: processing environment geometry during reorientation.Jennifer E. Sutton & Nora S. Newcombe - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  19.  7
    The hippocampus and “general” mnemonic function.Theodore W. Berger - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):323-324.
  20.  39
    The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map.C. S. Breathnach - 1980 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 27:263-267.
  21.  9
    Hippocampus and LTP: Here we go around again.C. H. Vanderwolf - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):633-634.
    A fundamental assumption in Shors & Matzel's target article is that brain activity can be related to the traditional categories of mentalistic psychology. This has led them to make numerous further assumptions that are contradicted by the available evidence.
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  22.  18
    Hippocampus and Parahippocampus Volume Reduction Associated With Impaired Olfactory Abilities in Subjects Without Evidence of Cognitive Decline.Satomi Kubota, Yuri Masaoka, Haruko Sugiyama, Masaki Yoshida, Akira Yoshikawa, Nobuyoshi Koiwa, Motoyasu Honma, Ryuta Kinno, Keiko Watanabe, Natsuko Iizuka, Masahiro Ida, Kenjiro Ono & Masahiko Izumizaki - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  23.  21
    Hippocampus, memory and movement.Abram Amsel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):494-495.
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  24.  36
    The hippocampus and operant behavior.Paul Ellen - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):500-501.
  25.  20
    Hippocampus and memory.Raymond P. Kesner - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):509-510.
  26.  15
    The hippocampus: a system for coping with environmental variability.Peter J. Livesey - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):336-337.
  27.  33
    Remembering the hippocampus.Stuart M. Zola & Larry R. Squire - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):469-471.
    The proposal that the hippocampus is important for the encoding of episodic information, but not familiarity-based recognition, is incompatible with the available data. An alternative way to think about functional specialization within the medial temporal lobe memory system is suggested, based on neuroanatomy.
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  28.  18
    The hippocampus: Relational processor or antiprocessor?Neil McNaughton - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):487-488.
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  29.  14
    Hippocampus and “general” mnemonic function: Only time will tell.Warren H. Meck - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):509-510.
  30.  31
    Relationships between the superior colliculus and hippocampus: Neural and behavioral considerations.Nigel Foreman & Robin Stevens - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):101-119.
    Theories of superior collicular and hippocampal function have remarkable similarities. Both structures have been repeatedly implicated in spatial and attentional behaviour and in inhibitory control of locomotion. Moreover, they share certain electrophysiological properties in their single unit responses and in the synchronous appearance and disappearance of slow wave activity. Both are phylogenetically old and the colliculus projects strongly to brainstem nuclei instrumental in the generation of theta rhythm in the hippocampal EECOn the other hand, close inspection of behavioural and electrophysiological (...)
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  31.  22
    The hippocampus, space, and human amnesia.Larry R. Squire - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):514-515.
  32.  24
    Hippocampus and superior colliculus: Interdependence or independence?Barry E. Stein - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):131-131.
  33.  48
    Such stuff as dreams are made on? Elaborative encoding, the ancient art of memory, and the hippocampus.Sue Llewellyn - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):589-607.
    This article argues that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming is elaborative encoding for episodic memories. Elaborative encoding in REM can, at least partially, be understood through ancient art of memory (AAOM) principles: visualization, bizarre association, organization, narration, embodiment, and location. These principles render recent memories more distinctive through novel and meaningful association with emotionally salient, remote memories. The AAOM optimizes memory performance, suggesting that its principles may predict aspects of how episodic memory is configured in the brain. Integration and segregation (...)
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  34.  15
    A Preliminary Report: The Hippocampus and Surrounding Temporal Cortex of Patients With Schizophrenia Have Impaired Blood-Brain Barrier.Eric L. Goldwaser, Randel L. Swanson, Edgardo J. Arroyo, Venkat Venkataraman, Mary C. Kosciuk, Robert G. Nagele, L. Elliot Hong & Nimish K. Acharya - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    Though hippocampal volume reduction is a pathological hallmark of schizophrenia, the molecular pathway responsible for this degeneration remains unknown. Recent reports have suggested the potential role of impaired blood-brain barrier function in schizophrenia pathogenesis. However, direct evidence demonstrating an impaired BBB function is missing. In this preliminary study, we used immunohistochemistry and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to investigate the state of BBB function in formalin-fixed postmortem samples from the hippocampus and surrounding temporal cortex of patients with schizophrenia and controls (...)
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  35.  5
    The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map.C. S. Breathnach - 1980 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 27:263-267.
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  36. Hippocampus.John O'Keefe - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
     
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  37.  53
    The hippocampus, a time machine that makes errors.Gianfranco Dalla Barba & Valentina La Corte - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):102-104.
  38.  11
    Hippocampus and memory for time.Raymond P. Kesner - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):485-486.
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  39.  33
    Perirhinal cortex and hippocampus mediate parallel processing of object and spatial location information.Raymond P. Kesner - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):455-455.
    An alternative to Aggleton & Brown's interpretation is presented suggesting that the perirhinal cortex and hippocampus mediate different attribute information, but use the same processes, supporting the idea of parallel processing based on attribute (visual object and spatial location) rather than process characteristics (item recognition and familiarity).
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  40.  27
    The hippocampus and time.Gordon Winocur - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):512-513.
  41.  14
    The hippocampus, synaptic enhancement, and intermediate-term memory.B. L. McNaughton & C. A. Barnes - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):507-508.
  42.  15
    The hippocampus and informational salience.John W. Moore - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):510-511.
  43.  18
    The hippocampus and attention.Gordon Winocur - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):132-133.
  44.  20
    The hippocampus as episodic encoder: Does it play tag?Robert H. I. Dale - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):499-500.
  45.  18
    The hippocampus and its apparent migration to the parietal lobe.Robert J. Douglas - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):498-499.
  46.  21
    Hippocampus, recognition, and recall: A new twist on some old data?Jonathan K. Foster - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):449-450.
    This commentary attempts to reconcile the predictions of Aggleton & Brown's theoretical framework with previous findings obtained from experimental tests of laboratory animals with selective hippocampal lesions. Adopting a convergent operations approach, the predictions of the model are also related to human neuroimaging data and to other complementary research perspectives (cognitive, computational, psychopharmacological).
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  47.  17
    The hippocampus is necessary for binding object identity to location in visual working memory.Pertzov Yoni & Husain Masud - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  48.  31
    Avian and mammalian hippocampus: No degrees of freedom in evolution of function.Michael Colombo - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):554-555.
    Aboitiz et al. suggest that the mammalian isocortex is derived from the dorsal cortex of reptiles and birds, and that there has been a major divergence in the connectivity patterns (and hence function) of the mammalian and reptilian/avian hippocampus. There is considerable evidence to suggest, however, that the avian hippocampus serves the exact same function as the mammalian hippocampus.
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  49.  34
    Thalamic amnesia and the hippocampus: Unresolved questions and an alternative candidate.Robert G. Mair, Joshua A. Burk, M. Christine Porter & Jessica E. Ley - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):458-459.
    Aggleton & Brown have built a convincing case that hippocampus-related circuits may be involved in thalamic amnesia. It remains to be established, however, that their model represents a distinct neurological system, that the distinction between recall and familiarity captures the roles of these pathways in episodic memory, or that there are no other systems that contribute to the signs of amnesia associated with thalamic disease.
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  50.  17
    On the hippocampus, time, and interference.Leonard E. Jarrard - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):503-504.
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