Results for 'motor control'

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  1.  71
    Skill and Motor Control: Intelligence All the Way Down.Ellen Fridland - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1-22.
    When reflecting on the nature of skilled action, it is easy to fall into familiar dichotomies such that one construes the flexibility and intelligence of skill at the level of intentional states while characterizing the automatic motor processes that constitute motor skill execution as learned but fixed, invariant, bottom-up, brute-causal responses. In this essay, I will argue that this picture of skilled, automatic, motor processes is overly simplistic. Specifically, I will argue that an adequate account of the (...)
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  2. The Concept of Simulation in Control-Theoretic Accounts of Motor Control and Action Perception.Mitchell Herschbach - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 315--20.
    Control theory is a popular theoretical framework for explaining cognitive domains such as motor control and “mindreading.” Such accounts frequently characterize their “internal models” as “simulating” things outside the brain. But in what sense are these “simulations”? Do they involve the kind of “replication” simulation found in the simulation theory of mindreading? I will argue that some but not all control -theoretic appeals to “simulation” involve R-simulation. To do so, I examine in detail a recent computational (...)
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  3.  25
    Motor Control and the Causal Relevance of Conscious Will: Libet’s Mind–Brain Theory.B. Ingemar B. Lindahl & Peter Århem - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 39 (1):46-59.
    This article examines three aspects of the problem of understanding Benjamin Libet’s idea of conscious will causally interacting with certain neural activities involved in generating overt bodily movements. The first is to grasp the notion of cause involved, and we suggest a definition. The second is to form an idea of by what neural structure(s) and mechanism(s) a conscious will may control the motor activation. We discuss the possibility that the acts of control have to do with (...)
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  4. The Concept of Voluntary Motor Control in the Recent Neuroscientific Literature.Paul Tibbetts - 2004 - Synthese 141 (2):247-76.
    The concept of voluntary motor control frequently appears in the neuroscientific literature, specifically in the context of cortically-mediated, intentional motor actions. For cognitive scientists, this concept of VMC raises a number of interesting questions: Are there dedicated, modular-like structures within the motor system associated with VMC? Or is it the case that VMC is distributed over multiple cortical as well as subcortical structures? Is there any one place within the so-calledhierarchy of motor control where (...)
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  5.  13
    Adaptability of Innate Motor Patterns and Motor Control Mechanisms.M. B. Berkinblit, A. G. Feldman & O. I. Fukson - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):585-599.
  6. The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception.Rick Grush - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies (...)
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  7.  31
    The Origin and Use of Positional Frames of Reference in Motor Control.Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):723-744.
  8.  9
    Changes in Motor Control and Individual Variations Under the Influence of 'Razzing.".D. A. Laird - 1923 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 6 (3):236.
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  9.  8
    Partial Visual Feedback of Component Motions as a Function of Difficulty of Motor Control.John D. Gould & Amy Schaffer - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):564.
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  10. Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review.Bill Faw - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.
    As an explicit organizing metaphor, memory aid, and conceptual framework, the prefrontal cortex may be viewed as a five-member ‘Executive Committee,’ as the prefrontal-control extensions of five sub-and-posterior-cortical systems: the ‘Perceiver’ is the frontal extension of the ventral perceptual stream which represents the world and self in object coordinates; the ‘Verbalizer’ is the frontal extension of the language stream which represents the world and self in language coordinates; the ‘Motivator’ is the frontal cortical extension of a subcortical extended-amygdala stream (...)
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  11.  11
    An Emotional Call to Action: Integrating Affective Neuroscience in Models of Motor Control.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):299-309.
    Intimate relationships between emotion and action have long been acknowledged, yet contemporary theories and experimental research within affective and movement neuroscience have not been linked into a coherent framework bridging these two fields. Accumulating psychological and neuroimaging evidence has, however, brought new insights regarding how emotions affect the preparation, execution, and control of voluntary movement. Here we review main approaches and findings on such emotion–action interactions. To assimilate key emotion concepts of action tendencies and motive states with fundamental constructs (...)
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  12.  50
    Schizotypal Personality Traits and Prediction of One’s Own Movements in Motor Control: What Causes an Abnormal Sense of Agency?Tomohisa Asai, Eriko Sugimori & Yoshihiko Tanno - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1131-1142.
    Background. Positive schizophrenic symptoms, especially passivity phenomena, including auditory hallucinations, may be caused by an abnormal sense of agency, which people with schizotypal personality traits also tend to exhibit. A sense of agency asserts that it is oneself who is causing or generating an action. It is possible that this abnormal sense of self-agency is attributable to the abnormal prediction of one’s own movements in motor control. Method. We conducted an experiment using the “disappeared cursor” paradigm in which (...)
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  13.  5
    Field Computation in Motor Control.Bruce MacLennan - unknown
    to small scales. Further, it is often useful to describe motor control and sensorimotor coordination in terms of external elds such as force elds and sensory images. We survey the basic concepts of eld computation, including both feed-forward eld operations and eld dynamics resulting from recurrent connections. Adaptive and learning mechanisms are discussed brie y. The application of eld computation to motor control is illustrated by several examples: external force elds associated with spinal neurons, population coding (...)
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  14.  9
    The Negative Feedback Dysregulation Effect: Losses of Motor Control in Response to Negative Feedback.Robert J. Klein & Michael D. Robinson - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (3):536-547.
    ABSTRACTNegative feedback has paradoxical features to it. This form of feedback can have informational value under some circumstances, but it can also threaten the ego, potentially upsetting behaviour as a result. To investigate possible consequences of the latter type, two experiments presented positive or negative feedback within a sequence-prediction task that could not be solved. Following feedback, participants had to control their behaviours as effectively as possible in a motor control task. Relative to positive feedback, negative feedback (...)
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  15.  36
    Perception, Action, and Motor Control: Interaction Does Not Necessarily Imply Common Structures.L. Pisella, A. Kritikos & Y. Rossetti - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):898-899.
    The Theory of Event Coding (TEC) provides a preliminary account of the interaction between perception and action, which is consistent with several recent findings in the area of motor control. Significant issues require integration and elaboration, however; particularly, distractor interference, automatic motor corrections, internal models of action, and neuroanatomical bases for the link between perception and action.
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  16.  31
    A Neuropsychological Approach to Motor Control and Imagery.Barbara Tomasino, Corrado Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Alessia Tessari, Caterina Spiezio & Raffaella Ida Rumiati - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):419-419.
    In his article Grush proposes a potentially useful framework for explaining motor control, imagery, and perception. In our commentary we will address two issues that the model does not seem to deal with appropriately: one concerns motor control, and the other, the visual and motor imagery domains. We will consider these two aspects in turn.
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  17.  5
    Kinematic Models Cannot Provide Insight Into Motor Control.Arnold B. Mitnitski - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):318-319.
    In Plamondon & Alimi's target article, a bell-shaped velocity profile typically observed in fast movements is used as a basis for the of motor control. In our opinion, kinematics is a necessary but insufficient ground for a theory of motor control. Relationships between different kinematic characteristics are an emergent property of the system dynamics controlled by the brain in a specific way. In particular, bell-shaped velocity profiles with or without additional waves are a trivial consequence of (...)
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  18. Skill and Motor Control: Intelligence All the Way Down.Ellen Fridland - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1539-1560.
    When reflecting on the nature of skilled action, it is easy to fall into familiar dichotomies such that one construes the flexibility and intelligence of skill at the level of intentional states while characterizing the automatic motor processes that constitute motor skill execution as learned but fixed, invariant, bottom-up, brute-causal responses. In this essay, I will argue that this picture of skilled, automatic, motor processes is overly simplistic. Specifically, I will argue that an adequate account of the (...)
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  19.  9
    Evidence From Optic Ataxia Does Not Support a Distinction Between Planning and Control Mechanisms in Human Motor Control.Roger Newport, Sally Pears & Stephen R. Jackson - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):45-46.
    Evidence from optic ataxic patients with bilateral lesions to the superior parietal lobes does not support the view that there are separate planning and control mechanisms located in the IPL and SPL respectively. The aberrant reaches of patients with bilateral SPL damage towards extrafoveal targets seem to suggest a deficit in the selection of appropriate motor programmes rather than a deficit restricted to on-line control.
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  20.  5
    Mechanisms of Control in Motor Performance: Closed-Loop Vs Motor Programming Control.Eric A. Roy & Ronald G. Marteniuk - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):985.
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  21.  66
    Computational Approaches to Motor Control.Daniel M. Wolpert - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (6):209-216.
  22.  42
    Causal Beliefs Lead to Toolmaking, Which Require Handedness for Motor Control.Lewis Wolpert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):242-242.
    Toolmaking requires motor skills that in turn require handedness, so that there is no competition between the two sides of the brain. Thus, handedness is not necessarily linked to vocalization but to the origin of causal beliefs required for making complex tools. Language may have evolved from these processes.
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  23.  8
    Eyeblink Conditioning, Motor Control, and the Analysis of Limbic-Cerebellar Interactions.Craig Weiss & John F. Disterhoft - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):479-481.
    Several target articles in this BBS special issue address the topic of cerebellar and olivary functions, especially as they pertain to motor earning. Another important topic is the neural interaction between the limbic system and the cerebellum during associative learning. In this commentary we present some of our data on olivo-cerebellar and limbic-cerebellar interactions during eyeblink conditioning. [HOUK et al.; SIMPSON et al.; THACH].
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  24.  5
    Microcomplexes: The Basic Unit of the Cerebellar Role in Adaptive Motor Control.Michael A. Arbib & Jacob Spoelstra - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):245-246.
    We offer a critique of the role of the parallel fiber beam as the unit of cerebellar computation, with the as its mode of operation. Instead we see the microcomplex linking cerebellar cortex and nuclei as the unit, with parallel fibers providing the means to coordinate the effects of microcomplexes in modulating various motor pattern generators (MPGs).
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  25.  3
    Motor Control of Serial Ordering of Speech.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (3):182-196.
  26.  14
    Motor Control: Which Themes Do We Orchestrate?J. A. S. Kelso & E. L. Saltzman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):554-557.
  27.  14
    Towards a Common Framework of Grounded Action Cognition: Relating Motor Control, Perception and Cognition.Antje Gentsch, Arne Weber, Matthis Synofzik, Gottfried Vosgerau & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2016 - Cognition 146:81-89.
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  28. Fundamentals of Motor Control, Kinesthesia and Spinal Neurons: In Search of a Theory.A. G. Feldman - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):735-737.
     
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  29. Is the Cerebellum a Motor Control Device?James M. Bower - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):714-715.
     
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  30.  19
    Consciousness and Motor Control.Arthur C. Danto - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):540-541.
  31.  9
    Control Theoretic Concepts and Motor Control.Gerald L. Gottlieb & Gyan C. Agarwal - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):546-547.
  32.  20
    Central Control and Reflex Regulation of Mechanical Impedance: The Basis for a Unified Motor-Control Scheme.J. A. Hoffer - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):548-549.
  33.  8
    Reflex Action in the Context of Motor Control.T. Richard Nichols - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):559-560.
  34.  4
    Motor Control: Models.Liana E. Brown & David A. Rosenbaum - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
  35.  7
    Decreased Modulation of EEG Oscillations in High-Functioning Autism During a Motor Control Task.Joshua B. Ewen, Balaji M. Lakshmanan, Ajay S. Pillai, Danielle McAuliffe, Carrie Nettles, Mark Hallett, Nathan E. Crone & Stewart H. Mostofsky - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  36.  35
    The Computational and Neural Basis of Voluntary Motor Control and Planning.Stephen H. Scott - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):541-549.
  37.  24
    Strong Functional Connectivity Among Homotopic Brain Areas Is Vital for Motor Control in Unilateral Limb Movement.Pengxu Wei, Zuting Zhang, Zeping Lv & Bin Jing - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  38.  1
    Synchrony in Joint Action Is Directed by Each Participant’s Motor Control System.Lior Noy, Netta Weiser & Jason Friedman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  39. Cognitive Resources Necessary for Motor Control in Older Adults Are Reduced by Walking and Coordination Training.Ben Godde & Claudia Voelcker-Rehage - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  40.  19
    Feedback Control of One’s Own Action: Self-Other Sensory Attribution in Motor Control.Tomohisa Asai - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 38:118-129.
  41.  12
    Systems Analysis in the Study of the Motor-Control System: Control Theory Alone is Insufficient.R. E. Kearney & I. W. Hunter - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):553-554.
  42.  65
    Neural Basis of Motor Control and its Cognitive Implications.Emilio Bizzi & Ferdinando A. Mussa-Ivaldi - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):97-102.
  43.  5
    The Role of Attention in Motor Control.Keith R. Lohse, Matt Jones, Alice F. Healy & David E. Sherwood - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):930-948.
  44.  23
    The Prerequisites for One-Jint Motor Control Theories.S. V. Adamovich & A. G. Feldman - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):210-211.
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  45.  17
    Motor Control and Sensory Feedback Enhance Prosthesis Embodiment and Reduce Phantom Pain After Long-Term Hand Amputation.David M. Page, Jacob A. George, David T. Kluger, Christopher Duncan, Suzanne Wendelken, Tyler Davis, Douglas T. Hutchinson & Gregory A. Clark - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  46.  5
    Losing Control, Literally: Relations Between Anger Control, Trait Anger, and Motor Control.Konrad Bresin & Michael D. Robinson - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):995-1012.
  47.  3
    Have You Herb About This; the Effect of Cholinergic Agonists on Motor Control.Maddison Weiss, Mitchell Longstaff & Steve Provost - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  48.  5
    Editorial: Motor Control of Gait and the Underlying Neural Network in Pediatric Neurology.Pieter Meyns, Maud van den Bogaart, Kyra Theunissen, Marjolein M. van der Krogt, Els Ortibus & Kaat Desloovere - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  49.  5
    Inhibitory Motor Control in Old Age: Evidence for De-Automatization?Elizabeth Ann Maylor, Kulbir Singh Birak & Friederike Schlaghecken - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  50. Neurobiological Modeling and Analysis-An Electromechanical Neural Network Robotic Model of the Human Body and Brain: Sensory-Motor Control by Reverse Engineering Biological Somatic Sensors.Alan Rosen & David B. Rosen - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 4232--105.
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