Results for 'motor tasks'

999 found
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  1.  14
    Blocking in Mental and Motor Tasks During a 65-Hour Vigil.N. Warren & B. Clark - 1937 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):97.
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  2.  21
    Voluntary Behavior in Cognitive and Motor Tasks.Heidi Kloos & Guy Van Orden - 2010 - Mind and Matter 8 (1):19-43.
    Many previous treatments of voluntary behavior have viewed intentions as causes of behavior. This has resulted in several dilemmas, including a dilemma concerning the origin of intentions. The present article circumvents traditional dilemmas by treating intentions as constraints that restrict degrees of freedom for behavior. Constraints self-organize as temporary dynamic structures that span the mind-body divide. This treatment of intentions and voluntary behavior yields a theory of intentionality that is consistent with existing findings and supported by current research.
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  3.  2
    Is the Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent fMRI Response to Motor Tasks Altered in Children After Neonatal Stroke?Mariam Al Harrach, François Rousseau, Samuel Groeschel, Stéphane Chabrier, Lucie Hertz-Pannier, Julien Lefevre & Mickael Dinomais - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  4.  12
    Visual-Motor Efficiency and the Information Transmitted in Visual-Motor Tasks.Barbara Sakitt - 1980 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (5):329-332.
  5.  18
    Manipulation Gesture Effect in Visual and Auditory Presentations: The Link Between Tools in Perceptual and Motor Tasks.Amandine E. Rey, Kévin Roche, Rémy Versace & Hanna Chainay - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  6.  9
    Modulation of Manual Preference Induced by Lateralized Practice Diffuses Over Distinct Motor Tasks: Age-Related Effects.Rosana M. Souza, Daniel B. Coelho & Luis A. Teixeira - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  7.  4
    On the Relation Between Similarity and Transfer of Training in the Learning of Discriminative Motor Tasks.R. M. Gagn?, Katherine E. Baker & Harriet Foster - 1950 - Psychological Review 57 (2):67-79.
  8.  10
    Spontaneous Gestures During Mental Rotation Tasks: Insights Into the Microdevelopment of the Motor Strategy.Mingyuan Chu & Sotaro Kita - 2008 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 137 (4):706-723.
  9.  2
    Primary Motor Cortex Activation During Action Observation of Tasks at Different Video Speeds Is Dependent on Movement Task and Muscle Properties.Takefumi Moriuchi, Daiki Matsuda, Jirou Nakamura, Takashi Matsuo, Akira Nakashima, Keita Nishi, Kengo Fujiwara, Naoki Iso, Hideyuki Nakane & Toshio Higashi - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  10.  20
    Brain Activation of Elite Race Walkers in Action Observation, Motor Imagery, and Motor Execution Tasks: A Pilot Study.Qihan Zhang, Peng Zhang, Lu Song, Yu Yang, Sheng Yuan, Yixin Chen, Shinan Sun & Xuejun Bai - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  11.  6
    Empirical Support for ‘Hastening-Through-Re-Automatization’ by Contrasting Two Motor-Cognitive Dual Tasks.Christine Langhanns & Hermann Müller - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  12.  3
    Motor Performance on Temporal Tasks as a Function of Sequence Length and Coherence.Don Trumbo, Merrill Noble, Frank Fowler & James Porterfield - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):397.
  13. Deictic Codes for the Embodiment of Cognition.Dana H. Ballard, Mary M. Hayhoe, Polly K. Pook & Rajesh P. N. Rao - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):723-742.
    To describe phenomena that occur at different time scales, computational models of the brain must incorporate different levels of abstraction. At time scales of approximately 1/3 of a second, orienting movements of the body play a crucial role in cognition and form a useful computational level embodiment level,” the constraints of the physical system determine the nature of cognitive operations. The key synergy is that at time scales of about 1/3 of a second, the natural sequentiality of body movements can (...)
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  14.  12
    Perceptual-Motor Performance Under Rotation of the Central Field.Daniel W. Smothergill, Richard Martin & Herbert L. Pick - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):64.
  15.  17
    The Role of Muscular Tension in the Recall of Interrupted Tasks.D. W. Forrest - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (2):181.
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  16.  16
    Associative Transfer in Motor Paired-Associate Learning as a Function of Amount of First-Task Practice.Charles C. Spiker & Ruth B. Holton - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):123.
  17.  13
    Self-Reinforcement and External Reinforcement in Visual-Motor Learning.Albert Marston - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (1):93-98.
  18.  15
    Through the Flat Canvas: The Motor Meaning of Realistic Paintings.Silvano Zipoli Caiani - 2016 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (2):197-217.
    It is well known that common objects in the environment can evoke possibilities of action, but what about their bi-dimensional representation? Do pictures or paintings that represent action-related objects evoke the same possibilities of actions of the objects that they represent? In contemporary cognitive science, there are two contrasting views on this issue. On the one hand, the ecological-dispositional approach to perception supports the idea that viewing depicted objects as endowed with the potential for action is nothing but an illusion. (...)
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  19.  11
    The Role of Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory.Diane Pecher - 2014 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 9.
    Motor affordances are important for object knowledge. Semantic tasks on visual objects often show interactions with motor actions. Prior neuro-imaging studies suggested that motor affordances also play a role in visual working memory for objects. When participants remembered manipulable objects greater premotor cortex activation was observed than when they remembered non-manipulable objects. In the present study participants held object pictures in working memory while performing concurrent tasks such as articulation of nonsense syllables and performing hand (...)
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  20.  10
    Changes in Distribution of Muscular Tension During Psychomotor Performance.Lee W. Gregg - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (1):70.
  21.  7
    The Effect of Difficulty of Task on Proactive Facilitation and Interference.Abram M. Barch - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (1):37.
  22.  6
    Speed/Accuracy Relations: The Kinetic–Kinematic Link and Predictions for Rapid Timing Tasks.Les G. Carlton & Yeou-Teh Liu - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):304-304.
    Recent accounts of the speed/accuracy relation for motor tasks have focused on the concept of motor output variability. We outline the advantages of this approach and the limitation of Plamondon's model in explaining movement error. We also examine and present complimentary data for rapid timing tasks. While these tasks do not meet the presented assumptions, the data still fit the model predictions.
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  23.  19
    A Spatially Oriented Decision Does Not Induce Consciousness in a Motor Task.Bruce Bridgeman & Valerie Huemer - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):454-464.
    Visual information follows at least two branches in the human nervous system, following a common input stage: a cognitive ''what'' branch governs perception and experience, while a sensorimotor ''how'' branch handles visually guided behavior though its outputs are unconscious. The sensorimotor system is probed with an isomorphic task, requiring a 1:1 relationship between target position and motor response. The cognitive system, in contrast, is probed with a forced qualitative decision, expressed verbally, about the location of a target. Normally, the (...)
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  24.  37
    Perceptual Decoupling or Motor Decoupling?James Head & William S. Helton - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):913-919.
    The current investigation was conducted to elucidate whether errors of commission in the Sustained Attention to Response Task are indicators of perceptual or motor decoupling. Twenty-eight participants completed SARTs with motor and perceptual aspects of the task manipulated. The participants completed four different SART blocks whereby stimuli location uncertainty and stimuli acquisition were manipulated. In previous studies of more traditional sustained attention tasks stimuli location uncertainty reduces sustained attention performance. In the case of the SART the (...) manipulation , but not the perceptual manipulation significantly reduced commission errors. The results suggest that the majority of SART commission errors are likely to be indicators of motor decoupling not necessarily perceptual decoupling. (shrink)
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  25. Structured Thoughts: The Spatial-Motor View.Benoit Hardy-Vallée & Pierre Poirier - 2005 - In Gerhard Schurz, Edouard Machery & Markus Werning (eds.), Applications to Linguistics, Psychology and Neuroscience. De Gruyter. pp. 229-250.
    Is thinking necessarily linguistic? Do we think with words, to use Bermudez’s (2003) phrase? Or does thinking occur in some other, yet to be determined, representational format? Or again do we think in various formats, switching from one to the other as tasks demand? In virtue perhaps of the ambiguous na- ture of first-person introspective data on the matter, philosophers have tradition- ally disagreed on this question, some thinking that thought had to be pictorial, other insisting that it could (...)
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  26.  10
    Understanding a-Not-B Errors as a Function of Object Representation and Deficits in Attention Rather Than Motor Memories.Ted Ruffman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):61-61.
    In this commentary, I raise several points. First, I argue that non-search tasks show that the A-not-B task is about object representation, even if perseveration can occur without objects. Second, I provide an alternative interpretation for the finding that changing body posture reduces A-not-B errors. Third, I provide an alternative interpretation for the finding of convergence in reaching behavior in two-target tasks. Fourth, I suggest attention deficits can explain the A-not-B error on their own with no necessity for (...)
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  27. Motor Simulation & the Effects of Energetic & Emotional Costs of Depicted Actions in Picture Perception.William Seeley - 2008 - Journal of Vision 8 (6):1041a.
    Psychological studies (Proffitt, 2006) have demonstrated that what one sees is influenced by one's goals, physiological state, and emotions. These studies demonstrate that there is a positive correlation between the physical demands (energetic cost) and perceived valence (emotional cost) of a task and the appearance of slant and egocentric distance in the environment. The studies are compelling. However, one can question whether their results are due to changes in the way participants perceived the orientation and extent of their environment or (...)
     
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  28.  44
    Does the Nervous System Use Equilibrium-Point Control to Guide Single and Multiple Joint Movements?E. Bizzi, N. Hogan, F. A. Mussa-Ivaldi & S. Giszter - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):603-613.
  29.  6
    Learning a Motor Task Under Varied Display Conditions.Norman B. Gordon - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (2):65.
  30.  19
    Development of Different Forms of Skill Learning Throughout the Lifespan.Ágnes Lukács & Ferenc Kemény - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (2):383-404.
    The acquisition of complex motor, cognitive, and social skills, like playing a musical instrument or mastering sports or a language, is generally associated with implicit skill learning . Although it is a general view that SL is most effective in childhood, and such skills are best acquired if learning starts early, this idea has rarely been tested by systematic empirical studies on the developmental pathways of SL from childhood to old age. In this paper, we challenge the view that (...)
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  31.  32
    The Role of Gesture in Supporting Mental Representations: The Case of Mental Abacus Arithmetic.Neon B. Brooks, David Barner, Michael Frank & Susan Goldin‐Meadow - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):554-575.
    People frequently gesture when problem-solving, particularly on tasks that require spatial transformation. Gesture often facilitates task performance by interacting with internal mental representations, but how this process works is not well understood. We investigated this question by exploring the case of mental abacus, a technique in which users not only imagine moving beads on an abacus to compute sums, but also produce movements in gestures that accompany the calculations. Because the content of MA is transparent and readily manipulated, the (...)
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  32.  33
    Consciousness and Choking in Visually-Guided Actions.Johan M. Koedijker & David L. Mann - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):333-348.
    Choking under pressure describes the phenomenon of people performing well below their expected standard under circumstances where optimal performance is crucial. One of the prevailing explanations for choking is that pressure increases the conscious attention to the underlying processes of the performer's task execution, thereby disrupting what would normally be a relatively automatic process. However, research on choking has focused mainly on the influence of pressure on motor performance, typically overlooking how it might alter the way that vision is (...)
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  33.  15
    Spatial Frames for Motor Control Would Be Commensurate with Spatial Frames for Vision and Proprioception, but What About Control of Energy Flows?Christopher C. Pagano & Geoffrey P. Bingham - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):773-773.
    The model identifies a spatial coordinate frame within which the sensorimotor apparatus produces movement. Its spatial nature simplifies its coupling with spatial reference frames used concurrently by vision and proprioception. While the positional reference frame addresses the performance of spatial tasks, it seems to have little to say about movements involving energy expenditure as the principle component of the task.
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  34.  5
    Predictive Movements and Human Reinforcement Learning of Sequential Action.Roy Kleijn, George Kachergis & Bernhard Hommel - forthcoming - Cognitive Science.
    Sequential action makes up the bulk of human daily activity, and yet much remains unknown about how people learn such actions. In one motor learning paradigm, the serial reaction time task, people are taught a consistent sequence of button presses by cueing them with the next target response. However, the SRT task only records keypress response times to a cued target, and thus it cannot reveal the full time-course of motion, including predictive movements. This paper describes a mouse movement (...)
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  35.  5
    The gift-reciprocity as motor of human development.Cristina Calvo - 2016 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 35:9-28.
    Por muchos años los economistas han afirmado que los individuos buscan maximizar la riqueza para maximizar su utilidad, porque "si somos más ricos, somos más felices". Es necesario reconocer que la vida buena, la felicidad, es la combinación de bienes materiales y de bienes relacionales. "Relaciones": es una gran preocupación, porque hoy el "bien escaso", son las relaciones genuinas, la confianza, la fraternidad. El "otro" como persona es, en sí mismo, un valor absoluto no sujeto a transacciones. La sociedad utilitarista (...)
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  36.  60
    A Robot That Walks; Emergent Behaviors From a Carefully Evolved Network.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    Most animals have significant behavioral expertise built in without having to explicitly learn it all from scratch. This expertise is a product of evolution of the organism; it can be viewed as a very long term form of learning which provides a structured system within which individuals might learn more specialized skills or abilities. This paper suggests one possible mechanism for analagous robot evolution by describing a carefully designed series of networks, each one being a strict augmentation of the previous (...)
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  37.  7
    Computational Domestication of Ignorant Entities.Lorenzo Magnani - forthcoming - Synthese:1-30.
    Eco-cognitive computationalism considers computation in context, following some of the main tenets advanced by the recent cognitive science views on embodied, situated, and distributed cognition. It is in the framework of this eco-cognitive perspective that we can usefully analyze the recent attention in computer science devoted to the importance of the simplification of cognitive and motor tasks caused in organic entities by the morphological features: ignorant bodies can be domesticated to become useful “mimetic bodies”, that is able to (...)
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  38.  6
    Driving and Dish-Washing: Failure of the Correspondence Metaphor for Memory.Keith S. Karn & Gregory J. Zelinsky - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):198-198.
    Koriat & Goldsmith restrict their definition of memory to “being about some past event,” which causes them to ignore the most common use of memory: everyday visual-motor tasks. New techniques make it possible to study memory in the context of these natural tasks with which memory is so tightly coupled. Memory can be more fully understood in the context of these actions.
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  39.  10
    Conservative or Nonconservative Control Schemes.Daniel M. Corcos & Kerstin Pfann - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):747-749.
    The conservative strategy proposed by the authors suggests a solution of the degrees-of-freedom problem of the controller. However, several simple motor control tasks cannot be explained by this strategy. A nonconservative strategy, in which more parameters of the control signal vary, can account for these simple motor tasks. However, the simplicity that distinguishes the proposed model from many others is lost.
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  40. Intention and Motor Representation in Purposive Action.Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Corrado Sinigaglia - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):119-145.
    Are there distinct roles for intention and motor representation in explaining the purposiveness of action? Standard accounts of action assign a role to intention but are silent on motor representation. The temptation is to suppose that nothing need be said here because motor representation is either only an enabling condition for purposive action or else merely a variety of intention. This paper provides reasons for resisting that temptation. Some motor representations, like intentions, coordinate actions in virtue (...)
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  41. The Representing Brain: Neural Correlates of Motor Intention and Imagery.Marc Jeannerod - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):187-202.
    This paper concerns how motor actions are neurally represented and coded. Action planning and motor preparation can be studied using a specific type of representational activity, motor imagery. A close functional equivalence between motor imagery and motor preparation is suggested by the positive effects of imagining movements on motor learning, the similarity between the neural structures involved, and the similar physiological correlates observed in both imaging and preparing. The content of motor representations can (...)
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  42.  91
    Skill and Motor Control: Intelligence All the Way Down.Ellen Fridland - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1-22.
    When reflecting on the nature of skilled action, it is easy to fall into familiar dichotomies such that one construes the flexibility and intelligence of skill at the level of intentional states while characterizing the automatic motor processes that constitute motor skill execution as learned but fixed, invariant, bottom-up, brute-causal responses. In this essay, I will argue that this picture of skilled, automatic, motor processes is overly simplistic. Specifically, I will argue that an adequate account of the (...)
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  43. Embodied Savoir-Faire: Knowledge-How Requires Motor Representations.Neil Levy - 2017 - Synthese 194 (2).
    I argue that the intellectualist account of knowledge-how, according to which agents have the knowledge-how to \ in virtue of standing in an appropriate relation to a proposition, is only half right. On the composition view defended here, knowledge-how at least typically requires both propositional knowledge and motor representations. Motor representations are not mere dispositions to behavior because they have representational content, and they play a central role in realizing the intelligence in knowledge-how. But since motor representations (...)
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  44. Motor Imagery and Action Execution.Bence Nanay - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    What triggers the execution of actions? What happens in that moment when an action is triggered? What mental state is there at the moment of action-execution that was not there a second before? My aim is to highlight the importance of a thus far largely ignored kind of mental state in the discussion of these old and much-debated questions: motor imagery. While there have been a fair amount of research in psychology and neuroscience on motor imagery in the (...)
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  45.  40
    Pictures, Action Properties and Motor Related Effects.Gabriele Ferretti - 2016 - Synthese 193 (12):3787-3817.
    The most important question concerning picture perception is: what perceptual state are we in when we see an object in a picture? In order to answer this question, philosophers have used the results of the two visual systems model, according to which our visual system can be divided into two streams, a ventral stream for object recognition, allowing one to perceive from an allocentric frame of reference, and a dorsal stream for visually guided motor interaction, thus allowing one to (...)
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  46. Dislocation, Not Dissociation: The Neuroanatomical Argument Against Visual Experience Driving Motor Action.Benjamin Kozuch - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (5):572-602.
    Common sense suggests that visual consciousness is essential to skilled motor action, but Andy Clark—inspired by Milner and Goodale's dual visual systems theory—has appealed to a wide range of experimental dissociations to argue that such an assumption is false. Critics of Clark's argument contend that the content driving motor action is actually within subjects' experience, just not easily discovered. In this article, I argue that even if such content exists, it cannot be guiding motor action, since a (...)
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  47.  46
    Tasks of Philosophy in the Present Age RIAS-Lecture, June 9, 1952.Cynthia R. Nielsen & Ian Alexander Moore - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):1-8.
    Translators’ Abstract: This is a translation of Hans-Georg Gadamer’s recently discovered 1952 Berlin speech. The speech includes several themes that reappear in Truth and Method, as well as in Gadamer’s later writings such as Reason in the Age of Science. For example, Gadamer criticizes positivism, modern philosophy’s orientation toward positivism, and Enlightenment narratives of progress, while presenting his view of philosophy’s tasks in an age of crisis. In addition, he discusses structural power, instrumental reason, the objectification of nature and (...)
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  48. Simon-Task Reveals Balanced Visuomotor Control in Experienced Video-Game Players.Andrew James Latham, Christine Westermann, Lucy L. M. Patston, Nathan A. Ryckman & Lynette J. Tippett - 2019 - Journal of Cognitive Enhancement 3 (1):104-110.
    Both short and long-term video-game play may result in superior performance on visual and attentional tasks. To further these findings, we compared the performance of experienced male video-game players (VGPs) and non-VGPs on a Simon-task. Experienced-VGPs began playing before the age of 10, had a minimum of 8 years of experience and a minimum play time of over 20 h per week over the past 6 months. Our results reveal a significantly reduced Simon-effect in experienced-VGPs relative to non-VGPs. However, (...)
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  49.  33
    The Origin and Use of Positional Frames of Reference in Motor Control.Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):723-744.
    A hypothesis about sensorimotor integration is described and applied to movement control and kinesthesia. The central idea is that the nervous system organizes positional frames of reference for the sensorimotor apparatus and produces active movements by shifting the frames in terms of spatial coordinates. Kinematic and electromyographic patterns are not programmed, but emerge from the dynamic interaction among the system s components, including external forces within the designated frame of reference. Motoneuronal threshold properties and proprioceptive inputs to motoneurons may be (...)
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  50. Motor Intentionality and the Case of Schneider.Rasmus Thybo Jensen - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):371-388.
    I argue that Merleau-Ponty’s use of the case of Schneider in his arguments for the existence of non-conconceptual and non-representational motor intentionality contains a problematic methodological ambiguity. Motor intentionality is both to be revealed by its perspicuous preservation and by its contrastive impairment in one and the same case. To resolve the resulting contradiction I suggest we emphasize the second of Merleau-Ponty’s two lines of argument. I argue that this interpretation is the one in best accordance both with (...)
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