Results for 'nerves'

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  1.  2
    Food, nerves, and fertility. Variations on the moral economy of the body, 1700–1920.Antonello La Vergata - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-30.
    In the literature investigating the long history of appeals to ‘nature’, in its multiple meanings, for rules of conduct or justification of social order, little attention has been paid to a long-standing tradition in which medical and physiological arguments merged into moral and social ones. A host of medical authors, biologists, social writers and philosophers assumed that nature spoke its moral language not only in its general economy, but also within and through the body. This is why, for instance, many (...)
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  2.  37
    Christopher Wren, Thomas Willis and the Depiction of the Brain and Nerves.Allister Neher - 2009 - Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (3):191-200.
    This paper is about Christopher Wren’s engravings for Thomas Willis’ The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves of 1664. It is a study in the intersection of medicine and art in 17th century Britain. Willis, an eminent English physician and anatomist, was a major figure in the development of modern neurology, and The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves was his most famous and influential book. Wren was Willis’ assistant and medical artist. I discuss the visual strategies employed (...)
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  3.  1
    Food, nerves, and fertility. Variations on the moral economy of the body, 1700–1920.Antonello La Vergata - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-30.
    In the literature investigating the long history of appeals to ‘nature’, in its multiple meanings, for rules of conduct or justification of social order, little attention has been paid to a long-standing tradition in which medical and physiological arguments merged into moral and social ones. A host of medical authors, biologists, social writers and philosophers assumed that nature spoke its moral language not only in its general economy, but also within and through the body. This is why, for instance, many (...)
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  4. Food, nerves, and fertility. Variations on the moral economy of the body, 1700–1920.Antonello La Vergata - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-30.
    In the literature investigating the long history of appeals to ‘nature’, in its multiple meanings, for rules of conduct or justification of social order, little attention has been paid to a long-standing tradition in which medical and physiological arguments merged into moral and social ones. A host of medical authors, biologists, social writers and philosophers assumed that nature spoke its moral language not only in its general economy, but also within and through the body. This is why, for instance, many (...)
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  5.  48
    The Nerves of Government: Models of Communication and Control.Stanley L. Fischer - 1965 - Ethics 75 (4):301-304.
  6. Body, Soul, and Nerves: Epicurus, Herophilus, Erasistratus, the Stoics, and Galen.Heinrich von Staden - 2002 - In John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.), Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
  7.  6
    Erasistratus’ Triplokia of Arteries, Veins and Nerves.David Leith - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (3):251-262.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  8.  4
    Bridging Psychiatric and Anthropological Approaches: The Case of “Nerves” in the United States.Britt Dahlberg, Frances K. Barg, Joseph J. Gallo & Marsha N. Wittink - 2009 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (3):282-313.
  9.  6
    Bridging Psychiatric and Anthropological Approaches: The Case of “Nerves” in the United States.Britt Dahlberg, Frances K. Barg, Joseph J. Gallo & Marsha N. Wittink - 2009 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (3):282-313.
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  10.  5
    Head, Rivers and Sherren on The Afferent Nervous System From a New Aspect, and Head and Sherron on The Consequences of Injury to the Peripheral Nerves in Man.Shepherd Ivory Franz - 1906 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (10):271.
  11.  22
    Elliot S. Valenstein. The War of the Soups and the Sparks: The Discovery of Neurotransmitters and the Dispute Over How Nerves Communicate. Xvii + 237 Pp., Illus., Notes, Index. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005. [REVIEW]Carl Craver - 2006 - Isis 97 (4):803-804.
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  12.  25
    Action Current Variation Along Nerves in Series.Gaylord Young - 1937 - Acta Biotheoretica 3 (2):149-152.
    Verteilung des Aktionsstromes längs zwei Nerven Die vonN. Rashevsky entwickelten Formeln für die Verteilung des Aktionsstromes in einer unendlichen Nervenfaser werden auf den Fall von zwei in Serie aneinander anliegenden Fasern verallgemeinert.Distribution du Courant d'action lelong de deux nerfs en série La théorie mathématique développée parN. Rashevsky pour le cas d'un nerf d'extension indéfinie est généralisée pour le cas d'un nerf aboutissant à distance finie à un autre nerf.
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  13.  15
    Ben Shephard. A War of Nerves: Soldiers and Psychiatrists in the Twentieth Century. Xiii + 487 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Originally Published in 2000. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003. $15.95. [REVIEW]Wade Pickren - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):753-754.
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  14. Concomitant Compressive Neuropathy of the Ulnar and Median Nerves in the Hand by Midpalmar Ganglion.Daniel A. Osei, Ariel A. Williams & Andrew J. Weiland - 2012 - In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. MIT Press. pp. 1--3.
     
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  15.  15
    Richardson's "Nerves": The Physiology of Sensibility in "Clarissa".Raymond Stephanson - 1988 - Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (2):267.
  16.  11
    Ben Shephard. A War of Nerves: Soldiers and Psychiatrists in the Twentieth Century. Xxiv + 487 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001. $27.95. [REVIEW]Mary Brown Parlee - 2002 - Isis 93 (3):519-520.
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  17.  5
    Reviews of Books and Periodicals / Chronique Bibliographique : Karl W. Deutsch, The Nerves of Government, Models of Political Commu Nication and Control. Collier-Macmillan, New York, 1963, 316 Pp. $ 6.50. [REVIEW]Alan Little - 1965 - Social Sciences Information 4 (4):197-198.
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  18.  7
    Forel's Hygiene of Nerves and Mind in Health and Disease.Joseph Jastrow - 1908 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (21):583.
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  19.  12
    Nerves: At the Intersection Between Science and Culture. [REVIEW]Richard C. Sha - 2006 - Metascience 15 (2):375-378.
  20.  7
    Pain Nerves.Herbert Nichols - 1896 - Psychological Review 3 (3):309-313.
  21.  15
    The Emergence of Nervennahrung: Nerves, Mind and Metabolism in the Long Eighteenth Century.Frank W. Stahnisch - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):405-417.
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  22.  8
    The War Of The Soups And The Sparks: The Discovery Of Neurotransmitters And The Dispute Over How Nerves Communicate. [REVIEW]Carl Craver - 2006 - Isis 97:803-804.
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  23.  8
    Role of Capsaicin-Sensitive Afferent Nerves in Initiation and Maintenance of Pathological Pain.Gábor Jancsó, Mária Dux & Péter Sántha - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):454-455.
    This commentary provides experimental data in support of the critical role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers in the initiation and maintenance of pathological pain. The demonstration of capsaicin-induced, centrally-evoked cutaneous hyperalgesia, and of neuroplastic changes elicited by the degeneration of C-fiber primary afferent terminals following peripheral nerve damage, indicates a significant contribution of capsaicin-sensitive sensory ganglion neurons in the development of pathological pain conditions. [coderre & katz].
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  24.  5
    W. T. Liberson. Collected Writings. Volume 1: 1941–1959. Compiled by, Cathryn Liberson. Introduction by, Robert Lovelace. Xii + 377 Pp., Illus. Union City, N.J.: Smyrna Press, 1998. $75 .Wladimir Theodore Liberson. Brain, Nerves, Muscles, and Electricity: My Life in Science. Compiled and Edited by, Robert Cohn and Cathryn W. Liberson. 186 Pp. Union City, N.J.: Smyrna Press, 1999. $15. [REVIEW]Patricia B. Swan - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):747-748.
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  25.  4
    Hygiene of Nerves and Mind in Health and Disease.August Forel - 1908 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (21):583-584.
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  26.  4
    Orel's Hygiene of Nerves and Mind in Health and Disease. [REVIEW]Joseph Jastrow - 1908 - Journal of Philosophy 5 (21):583.
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  27.  3
    Andreas Killen. Berlin Electropolis: Shock, Nerves, and German Modernity. Viii + 295 Pp., Apps., Bibl., Index. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. $49.95. [REVIEW]Daniel Morat - 2007 - Isis 98 (2):407-408.
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  28.  3
    Pain Nerves.Herbert Nichols - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (5):487-490.
  29.  3
    The Emergence of Nervennahrung: Nerves, Mind and Metabolism in the Long Eighteenth Century.Frank W. Stahnisch - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):405-417.
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  30.  1
    On the Inadequacy of the Cellular Theory of Development and on the Early Development of Nerves, Particularly the Third Nerve, and of the Sympathetic in Elasmobranchii.No Authorship Indicated - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (2):194-195.
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  31. "Shattered Nerves": Doctors, Patients, and Depression in Victorian England. Janet Oppenheim.Bonnie Ellen Blustein - 1992 - Isis 83 (3):507-508.
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  32. Invisible Anatomy: A Study of Nerves, Hysteria and Sex.E. Graham Howe, Edward Glover, John Layard & Robert R. Sears - 1946 - Mind 55 (220):346-356.
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  33. FOREL, A. -Hygiene of Nerves and Mind in Health and Disease. Trans. A. Aikins. [REVIEW]W. L. Mackenzie - 1908 - Mind 17:275.
     
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  34. Evolution of Nerves and Nervo-Systems.Romanes Romanes - 1877 - Mind 2:565.
     
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  35. Physical Pain and Pain Nerves.C. A. Strong - 1896 - Psychological Review 3 (1):64-68.
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  36.  4
    The Actions of Spirit and Appetite: Voluntary Motion in Galen.Julia Trompeter - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (2):176-207.
    Galen is criticized for combining Plato’s tripartition-cum-trilocation of the soul, in which each part constitutes its own source of motivation, with the demand that the faculty of voluntary motion is limited to the rational part, being the only one located in the brain and having access to the relevant nerves. While scholars have concentrated on small nerves as connective organs, this paper focuses on thepneuma, blood and innate heat. When the latter is increased, the irrational parts can affect (...)
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  37.  21
    The Nature of Acoustic Response: The Relation Between Sound Frequency and Frequency of Impulses in the Auditory Nerve.E. G. Wever & C. W. Bray - 1930 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (5):373.
  38.  30
    Whytt and the Idea of Power.Claire Etchegaray - 2013 - Early Science and Medicine 18 (4-5):381-404.
  39.  38
    The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System.István Aranyosi - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers of mind, both in the conceptual analysis tradition and in the empirical informed school, have been implicitly neglecting the potential conceptual role of the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) in understanding sensory and perceptual states. Instead, the philosophical as well as the neuroscientific literature has been assuming that it is the Central Nervous System (CNS) alone, and more exactly the brain, that should prima facie be taken as conceptually and empirically crucial for a philosophical analysis of such states This is (...)
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  40. Elegance in Science: The Beauty of Simplicity.Ian Glynn - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    The meaning of elegance -- Celestial mechanics : the route to Newton -- Bringing the heavens down to earth -- So what is heat? -- Elegance and electricity -- Throwing light on light : with the story of Thomas Young -- How do nerves work? -- Information handling in the brain -- The genetic code -- Epilogue : a cautionary tale.
     
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  41. The Physiology of the Sense Organs and Early Neo-Kantian Conceptions of Objectivity: Helmholtz, Lange, Liebmann.Scott Edgar - 2015 - In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: Approaches to Historical Epistemology. Boston Studies in Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.
    The physiologist Johannes Müller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies had a decisive influence on neo-Kantian conceptions of the objectivity of knowledge in the 1850s - 1870s. In the first half of the nineteenth century, Müller amassed a body of experimental evidence to support his doctrine, according to which the character of our sensations is determined by the structures of our own sensory nerves, and not by the external objects that cause the sensations. Neo-Kantians such as Hermann von Helmholtz, F.A. (...)
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  42.  59
    Expert System for the Diagnosis of Seventh Nerve Inflammation (Bell’s Palsy) Disease.Alaa Soliman Abu Mettleq, Ibtesam M. Dheir, Abeer A. Elsharif & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Information Systems Research (IJAISR) 3 (4):27-35.
    Background: The occurrence of any disturbance in the seventh facial nerve in the nerves of the brain called inflammation of the seventh nerve or paralysis in the face of half (Bell's paralysis), where paralysis affects one side of the face, and occurs when the seventh nerve, which controls the muscles of the face loses the patient control of the facial muscles on The side of inflammation is the seventh nerve because it controls the muscles on both sides of the (...)
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  43. Emil du Bois-Reymond Vs Ludimar Hermann.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2006 - Comptes Rendus Biologies 329 (5-6):340-347.
    This essay recounts a controversy between a pioneer electrophysiologist, Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896), and his student, Ludimar Hermann (1838–1914). Du Bois-Reymond proposed a molecular explanation for the slight electrical currents that he detected in frog muscles and nerves. Hermann argued that du Bois-Reymond's ‘resting currents’ were an artifact of injury to living tissue. He contested du Bois-Reymond's molecular model, explaining his teacher's observations as electricity produced by chemical decomposition. History has painted Hermann as the wronged party in this dispute. (...)
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  44.  10
    The Brain Takes Shape: An Early History.Robert L. Martensen - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    This fine book tells an important story of how long-standing notions about the body as dominated by spirit-like humors were transformed into scientific descriptions of its solid tissues. Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, Willis, and Locke all played roles in this transformation, as the cerebral hemispheres and cranial nerves began to take precedence over the role of spirit, passion, and the heart in human thought and behavior. Non of this occurred in a social vacuum, and the book describes the historical context (...)
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  45. Reasons as Causes in Bayesian Epistemology.Clark Glymour & David Danks - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy 104 (9):464-474.
    In everyday matters, as well as in law, we allow that someone’s reasons can be causes of her actions, and often are. That correct reasoning accords with Bayesian principles is now so widely held in philosophy, psychology, computer science and elsewhere that the contrary is beginning to seem obtuse, or at best quaint. And that rational agents should learn about the world from energies striking sensory inputs nerves in people—seems beyond question. Even rats seem to recognize the difference between (...)
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  46. Losing Touch: A Man Without His Body.Jonathan Cole - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    What is like to live without touch or movement/position sense? The only way to understand the importance of these senses, so familiar we cannot imagine their absence, is to ask someone in that position. Ian Waterman lost them below the neck over forty years ago, though pain and temperature perception and his peripheral movement nerves were unaffected. Without proprioceptive feedback and touch the movement brain was disabled. Completely unable to move, he felt disembodied and frightened. Then, slowly, he taught (...)
     
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  47.  66
    The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception: Immanuel Kant, Alonzo Church, and Neuroscience.Hermann G. W. Burchard - 2011 - Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to (...)
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  48.  54
    Somaesthetics and Burke's Sublime.Richard Shusterman - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):323-341.
    Burke is an important exception to Nietzsche's claim that philosophical aesthetics ignores physiology and the role of practical interest. Grounded on the powerful interest of survival, Burke's theory of the sublime also offers a physiological explanation of our feelings of sublimity that explicitly defines certain conditions of our nerves as the ‘efficient cause’ of such feelings. While his general account of sublimity is widely appreciated, its somatic dimension has been dismissed as hopelessly misguided. In examining Burke's views in relation (...)
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  49.  36
    Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue.R. S. W. Masters, J. M. Poolton & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.
    Implicit processes almost certainly preceded explicit processes in our evolutionary history, so they are likely to be more resistant to disruption according to the principles of evolutionary biology [Reber, A. S. . The cognitive unconscious: An evolutionary perspective. Consciousness and Cognition, 1, 93–133.]. Previous work . Knowledge, nerves and know-how: The role of explicit versus implicit knowledge in the breakdown of a complex motor skill under pressure. British Journal of Psychology, 83, 343–358.]) has shown that implicitly learned motor skills (...)
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  50.  31
    L’Homme in Psychology and Neuroscience.Gary Hatfield - 2016 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), Descartes' Treatise on Man and Its Reception. New York: Springer. pp. 269–285.
    L’Homme presents what has been termed Descartes’ “physiological psychology”. It envisions and seeks to explain how the brain and nerves might yield situationally appropriate behavior through mechanical means. On occasion in the past 150 years, this aim has been recognized, described, and praised. Still, acknowledgement of this aspect of Descartes’ writing has been spotty in histories of neuroscience and histories of psychology. In recent years, there has been something of a resurgence. This chapter argues that, in seeking to explain (...)
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