Results for 'non-human personhood'

997 found
Order:
  1.  24
    Consciousness, Language, and the Possibility of Non-Human Personhood: Reflections on Elephants.Don Ross - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (3-4):227-251.
    I investigate the extent to which there might be, now or in the future, non-human animals that partake in the kind of fully human-style consciousness that has been taken by many philosophers to be the basis of normative personhood. I first sketch a conceptual framework for considering the question, based on a range of philosophical literature on relationships between consciousness, language and personhood. I then review the standard basis for largely a priori skepticism about the possibility that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  7
    African Communalism, Persons, and the Case of Non-Human Animals.Kai Horsthemke - 2018 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 7 (2):60-79.
    “I am because we are, and since we are, therefore I am”, generally regarded as the guiding principle of African humanism, expresses the view that a person is a person through other persons and is closely associated but not identical with African communitarianism, or communalism. Against Ifeanyi Menkiti’s “unrestricted or radical or excessive communitarianism” Kwame Gyekye has proposed a “restricted or moderate communitarianism”. Whereas personhood, for Menkiti, is acquired over time, with increasing moral maturation, seniority and agency, Gyekye considers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  12
    Baker on Human Personhood.Eugene Mills - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Research 40:473-481.
    Lynne Rudder Baker offers an account of what it is to be a human person, involving what she calls a “first person perspective,” that is separable from her constitution-view of human persons and adaptable to a variety of rival views of personal ontology. I argue that this account fails, no matter what view of personal ontology it is coupled with, on account of giving biological humanity an absurd role in determining the personhood of both possible human and non-human (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  39
    Human Non-Persons, Feticide, and the Erosion of Dignity.Daryl Pullman - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):353-364.
    Feticide, the practice of terminating the life of an otherwise viable fetus in utero, has become an increasingly common practice in obstetric centres around the globe, a concomitant of antenatal screening technologies. This paper examines this expanding practice in light of the concept of human dignity. Although it is assumed from the outset that even viable human fetuses are not persons and as such do not enjoy full membership in the moral community, it is argued that the fact that these (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Human Nature, Personhood, and Ethical Naturalism.John Hacker-Wright - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):413-427.
    John McDowell has argued that for human needs to matter in practical deliberation, we must have already acquired the full range of character traits that are imparted by an ethical upbringing. Since our upbringings can diverge considerably, his argument makes trouble for any Aristotelian ethical naturalism that wants to support a single set of moral virtues. I argue here that there is a story to be told about the normal course of human life according to which it is no coincidence (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  32
    Against Anthropocentrism. Non-Human Otherness and the Post-Human Project.Roberto Marchesini - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (1):75-84.
    Technoscientific progress brings into question both anthropocentric epistemology and anthropocentric/humanistic ontology, which considers the human being as a self-constructing and self-sufficient entity. Even though, Darwinism recomposes the humanistic disjunction between reality and representation: by defining the human being as the result of an adaptive reflection, it reveals the idealistic character of post-Cartesian thought, which is the backbone of philosophical anthropocentrism. The non-human can be a dialogic entity if and only if it is considered not as “animal-by” but “animal-with”, that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Equilibrium Explanation as Structural Non-Mechanistic Explanation: The Case Long-Term Bacterial Persistence in Human Hosts.Javier Suárez & Roger Deulofeu - 2019 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 3 (38):95-120.
    Philippe Huneman has recently questioned the widespread application of mechanistic models of scientific explanation based on the existence of structural explanations, i.e. explanations that account for the phenomenon to be explained in virtue of the mathematical properties of the system where the phenomenon obtains, rather than in terms of the mechanisms that causally produce the phenomenon. Structural explanations are very diverse, including cases like explanations in terms of bowtie structures, in terms of the topological properties of the system, or in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  71
    International Soft Law, Human Rights and Non-State Actors: Towards the Accountability of Transnational Corporations? [REVIEW]Elena Pariotti - 2009 - Human Rights Review 10 (2):139-155.
    During this age of globalisation, the law is characterised by an ever diminishing hierarchical framework, with an increasing role played by non-state actors. Such features are also pertinent for the international enforceability of human rights. With respect to human rights, TNCs seem to be given broadening obligations, which approach the borderline between ethics and law. The impact of soft law in this context is also relevant. This paper aims to assess whether, and to what extent, this trend could be a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  18
    An Umbrella With Holes: Respect for Non-Derogable Human Rights During Declared States of Emergency, 1996–2004. [REVIEW]David L. Richards & K. Chad Clay - 2012 - Human Rights Review 13 (4):443-471.
    This paper examines the effects of non-derogability status for seven human rights during declared states of emergency from 1996 to 2004 in 195 countries. For this purpose, we create several original measures of countries’ state of emergency status. Our analysis finds the intended protections from the special legal status of non-derogable rights to be anemic, at best, during declared emergencies. This finding begs a reconsideration of both the utility of the “non-derogable” categorization in both international and municipal law, and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  42
    Automatic Behavior and Moral Agency: Defending the Concept of Personhood From Empirically Based Skepticism.C. D. Meyers - 2015 - Acta Analytica 30 (2):193-209.
    Empirical evidence indicates that much of human behavior is unconscious and automatic. This has led some philosophers to be skeptical of responsible agency or personhood in the moral sense. I present two arguments defending agency from these skeptical concerns. My first argument, the “margin of error” argument, is that the empirical evidence is consistent with the possibility that our automatic behavior deviates only slightly from what we would do if we were in full conscious control. Responsible agency requires only (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  45
    Brain Simulation and Personhood: A Concern with the Human Brain Project.Daniel Lim - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (2):77-89.
    The Human Brain Project (HBP) is a massive interdisciplinary project involving hundreds of researchers across more than eighty institutions that seeks to leverage cutting edge information and communication technologies to create a multi-level brain simulation platform (BSP). My worry is that some brain models running on the BSP will be persons. If this is right then not only will the in silico experiments the HBP envisions being carried on the BSP be unethical the mere termination of certain brain models running (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  79
    “Other Selves”: Moral and Legal Proposals Regarding the Personhood of Cryopreserved Human Embryos.E. Christian Brugger - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):105-129.
    This essay has two purposes. The first is to argue that our moral duties towards human embryos should be assessed in light of the Golden Rule by asking the normative question, “how would I want to be treated if I were an embryo?” Some reject the proposition “I was an embryo” on the basis that embryos should not be recognized as persons. This essay replies to five common arguments denying the personhood of human embryos: (1) that early human embryos (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  15
    If Embryos and Fetuses Have Rights.Michele GoodwIn - 2017 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 11 (2):189-224.
  14.  6
    The Role of Non‐Human Exemplars in Aquinas.Adam M. Willows - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1081):332-345.
    In this paper I discuss the role of non-humans in Aquinas’ account of moral learning. I intend to show that the entire created order can play an important role in demonstrating to us the life of virtue, and argue that non-human exemplars offer important advantages to the moral learner. I begin by addressing apparent problems with this approach, founded on the observation that human virtue, for Aquinas, is unique to humans. I resolve these by showing that Aquinas’ approach to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  24
    Human, Non-Human, and Beyond: Cochlear Implants in Socio-Technological Environments.Beate Ochsner, Markus Spöhrer & Robert Stock - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):237-250.
    The paper focuses on processes of normalization through which dis/ability is simultaneously produced in specific collectives, networks, and socio-technological systems that enable the construction of such demarcations. Our point of departure is the cochlear implant, a neuroprosthetic device intended to replace and/or augment the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which amplify sounds, the CI does the work of damaged hair cells in the inner ear by providing sound signals to the brain. We examine the processes of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  78
    Human Dignity and the Non-Utilitarist Consequentialist Ethics of Social Consequences.V. Gluchman - 2004 - Filozofia 59:502-506.
    Prominent critics of consequentialism hold that utilitarianism is not capable of accepting authentic human values, because the consequentialist viewpoint is impersonal. According to it consequentialist rationality has no axiological limits and it can think about doing the unthinkable. The main objective of the paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in the author’s conception of ethics of social consequences arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. The author argues that the ethics of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  79
    Should Trees Have Managerial Standing? Toward Stakeholder Status for Non-Human Nature.Mark Starik - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):207 - 217.
    Most definitions of the concept of stakeholder include only human entities. This paper advances the argument that the non-human natural environment can be integrated into the stakeholder management concept. This argument includes the observations that the natural environment is finally becoming recognized as a vital component of the business environment, that the stakeholder concept is more than a human political/economic one, and that non-human nature currently is not adequately represented by other stakeholder groups. In addition, this paper asserts (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  18. Collective Intentionality in Non-Human Animals.Robert A. Wilson - 2017 - In Marija Jankovic and Kirk Ludwig (ed.), Routledge Handbook on Collective Intentionality. New York, NY, USA: pp. 420-432.
    I think there is something to be said in a positive and constructive vein about collective intentionality in non-human animals. Doing so involves probing at the concept of collective intentionality fairly directly (Section 2), considering the various forms that collective intentionality might take (Section 3), showing some sensitivity to the history of appeals to that concept and its close relatives (Section 4), and raising some broader questions about the relationships between sociality, cognition, and institutions by discussing two different possible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Rationality and Metacognition in Non-Human Animals.Joëlle Proust - 2006 - In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press. pp. 247--274.
    The project of understanding rationality in non-human animals faces a number of conceptual and methodological difficulties. The present chapter defends the view that it is counterproductive to rely on the human folk psychological idiom in animal cognition studies. Instead, it approaches the subject on the basis of dynamic- evolutionary considerations. Concepts from control theory can be used to frame the problem in the most general terms. The specific selective pressures exerted on agents endowed with information-processing capacities are analysed. It (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  20.  9
    Naturecultures? Science, Affect and the Non-Human.Joanna Latimer & Mara Miele - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (7-8):5-31.
    Rather than focus on effects, the isolatable and measureable outcomes of events and interventions, the papers assembled here offer different perspectives on the affective dimension of the meaning and politics of human/non-human relations. The authors begin by drawing attention to the constructed discontinuity between humans and non-humans, and to the kinds of knowledge and socialities that this discontinuity sustains, including those underpinned by nature-culture, subject-object, body-mind, individual-society polarities. The articles presented track human/non-human relations through different domains, including: humans/non-humans (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21. A Reconsideration of Indirect Duties Regarding Non-Human Organisms.Toby Svoboda - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):311-323.
    According to indirect duty views, human beings lack direct moral duties to non-human organisms, but our direct duties to ourselves and other humans give rise to indirect duties regarding non-humans. On the orthodox interpretation of Kant’s account of indirect duties, one should abstain from treating organisms in ways that render one more likely to violate direct duties to humans. This indirect duty view is subject to several damaging objections, such as that it misidentifies the moral reasons we have to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  29
    Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture.Christian Smith - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    What kind of animals are human beings? And how do our visions of the human shape our theories of social action and institutions? In Moral, Believing Animals>, Christian Smith advances a creative theory of human persons and culture that offers innovative, challenging answers to these and other fundamental questions in sociological, cultural, and religious theory. Smith suggests that human beings have a peculiar set of capacities and proclivities that distinguishes them significantly from other animals on this planet. Despite the vast (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  23.  16
    The Ethical Justification for the Use of Non-Human Primates in Research: The Weatherall Report Revisited.Gardar Arnason - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):328-331.
    The Weatherall report on the use of non-human primates in research was published in 2006. Its main conclusion was that there is a strong scientific case for the use of non-human primates in some cases, but the report stressed the importance of evaluating each case in the light of the availability of alternatives. In addition to arguing for the scientific necessity of using non-human primates in research, the report also provided an ethical justification. As could be expected, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Differences in the Evaluation of Generic Statements About Human and Non‐Human Categories.Arber Tasimi, Susan Gelman, Andrei Cimpian & Joshua Knobe - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1934-1957.
    Generic statements express generalizations about categories. Current theories suggest that people should be especially inclined to accept generics that involve threatening information. However, previous tests of this claim have focused on generics about non-human categories, which raises the question of whether this effect applies as readily to human categories. In Experiment 1, adults were more likely to accept generics involving a threatening property for artifacts, but this negativity bias did not also apply to human categories. Experiment 2 examined an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  10
    Abduction: Can Non-Human Animals Make Discoveries?Mariana Vitti-Rodrigues & Claus Emmeche - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (2):295-313.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between information and abductive reasoning in the context of problem-solving, focusing on non-human animals. Two questions guide our investigation: What is the relation between information and abductive reasoning in the context of human and non-human animals? Do non-human animals perform discovery based on inferential processes such as abductive reasoning? In order to answer these questions, we discuss the semiotic concept of information in relation to the concept of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  48
    Harm in the Wild: Facing Non-Human Suffering in Nature. [REVIEW]Beril İdemen Sözmen - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1075-1088.
    The paper is concerned with whether the reductio of the natural-harm-argument can be avoided by disvaluing non-human suffering and death. According to the natural-harm-argument, alleviating the suffering of non-human animals is not a moral obligation for human beings because such an obligation would also morally prescribe human intervention in nature for the protection of non-human animal interests which, it claims, is absurd. It is possible to avoid the reductio by formulating the moral obligation to alleviate non-human (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  12
    A Flimsy Case for the Use of Non-Human Primates in Research: A Reply to Arnason.Catia Faria - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):332-333.
    The Weatherall Report claims that research on non-human primates is permitted and morally required. The argument rests on the following thought experiment: > The hospital fire : A hospital is on fire. Some of the residents are humans and others are non-human animals. You can only save one group. What do you do? Some people have the intuition that we should rescue the humans. According to the report, if we accept that human lives have priority over non-human (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  12
    Differentiating Between Human and Non-Human Interspecies Embryos.Calum MacKellar - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):284-285.
    Following the debate in the UK House of Lords, in December 2012, uncertainty remains as to the manner in which human and non-human interspecies embryos are differentiated in law.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  3
    In the Blink of an Eye: Human and Non-Human Animals, Movement, and Bio-Political Existence.Annalisa Colombino & Paolo Palladino - 2019 - Angelaki 24 (6):168-183.
    This paper examines the proposition that movement offers new insight into the relationship between human and non-human animals, a relationship that is important to understanding contemporar...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  46
    Moral Individualism, Moral Relationalism, and Obligations to Non‐Human Animals.Todd May - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):155-168.
    Moral individualists like Jeff McMahan and Peter Singer argue that our moral obligations to animals, both human and non‐human, are grounded in the morally salient capacities of those animals. By contrast, what might be called moral relationalists argue that our obligations to non‐human animals are grounded in our relationship to them. Moral relationalists are of various kinds, from relationalists regarding assistance to animals, such as Clare Palmer and Elizabeth Anderson, to relationalists grounded in a Wittgensteinian view of human practice, such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  16
    Dicent Symbols in Non-Human Semiotic Processes.João Queiroz - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):319-329.
    Against the view that symbol-based semiosis is a human cognitive uniqueness, we have argued that non-human primates such as African vervet monkeys possess symbolic competence, as formally defined by Charles S. Peirce. Here I develop this argument by showing that the equivocal role ascribed to symbols by “folk semiotics” stems from an incomplete application of the Peircean logical framework for the classification of signs, which describes three kinds of symbols: rheme, dicent and argument. In an attempt to advance in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  27
    Non-Human Primates: The Appropriate Subjects of Biomedical Research?M. Quigley - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (11):655-658.
    Following the publication of the Weatherall report on the use of non-human primates in research, this paper reflects on how to provide appropriate and ethical models for research beneficial to humankind. Two of the main justifications for the use of non-human primates in biomedical research are analysed. These are the “least-harm/greatest-good” argument and the “capacity” argument. This paper argues that these are equally applicable when considering whether humans are appropriate subjects of biomedical research.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33.  2
    Temporal Representation and Reasoning in Non-Human Animals.Angelica Kaufmann & Arnon Cahen - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Hoerl & McCormack argue that comparative and developmental psychology teaches us that “neither animals nor infants can think and reason about time.” We argue that the authors neglect to take into account pivotal evidence from ethology that suggests that non-human animals do possess a capacity to represent and reason about time, namely, work done on Sumatran orangutans’ long travel calls.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  19
    Comparative Metaphysics: The Development of Representing Natural and Normative Regularities in Human and Non-Human Primates.Hannes Rakoczy - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):683-697.
    How do human children come up to carve up and think of the world around them in its most general and abstract structure? And to which degree are these general forms of viewing the world shared by other animals, notably by non-human primates? In response to these questions of what could be called comparative metaphysics, this paper discusses new evidence from developmental and comparative research to argue for the following picture: human children and non-human primates share a basic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  19
    Sympathy and the Non-Human: Max Scheler’s Phenomenology of Interrelation.David Dillard-Wright - 2007 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2):1-9.
    German phenomenologist and sociologist Max Scheler accorded sympathy a central role in his philosophy, arguing that sympathy enables not only ethical behaviour, but also knowledge of animate and inanimate others. Influenced by Catholicism and especially St Francis, Scheler envisioned a broad, cosmic sympathy forming the hidden basis for all human values, with the “higher” religious, artistic, philosophic and other cultural values enabled by a more basic regard for non-human nature and insights gained from the human situation within the (...) world. Sympathy for the non-human is thus both integral and fundamental to the cultivation of other values in the development of both the human person and humanity in general. Scheler’s concept of sympathy is valuable for contemporary animal ethics because it insists on acknowledgement of and respect for difference as constitutive for the experience of sympathy. By thus allowing for sympathy to occur in the absence of complete knowledge of other subjectivities, Scheler’s phenomenology of sympathy eliminates the need for complete understanding of the consciousness of other animals as a prerequisite for interspecies sympathy. Despite their inability to completely inhabit non-human perspectives, humans can thus sympathize with other creatures. While Scheler is a foundational thinker and, to a large degree, maintains hierarchical structures contested by many contemporary animal theorists, he remains a valuable source for contemporary theory insofar as he acknowledges a “fundamental basis of connection” between species and affirms that all animal bodies are communicative. The occasioning of sympathy by gestural signification opens a path of insight that can increase human openness to non-human others. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology , Volume 7, Edition 2 September 2007. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  32
    Beyond Percept and Affect: Beckett's Film and Non-Human Becoming.Colin Gardner - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (4):589-600.
    Film, Samuel Beckett's 1964 short starring Buster Keaton, dubbed by Deleuze as ‘The Greatest Irish Film’, is a seminal text in the latter's cinematic canon as it helps us to extrapolate the transition from the Bergson-based movement-image of Cinema 1 to the Nietzschean time-image of Cinema 2. Film is unique insofar as its narrative traverses and progressively destroys the action-, perception- and affection-images that constitute the movement-image as a whole, using Keaton's body, and more importantly his face, as a means (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  13
    The Use of Non-Human Primates in Research.Kate Chatfield & David Norton - 2018 - In D. Schroeder, J. Cook, F. Hirsch, S. Fenet & V. Muthuswamy (eds.), Ethics Dumping: Case Studies from North-South Research Collaborations. Springer.
    The use of non-human primates in biomedical research is a contentious issue that raises serious ethical and practical concerns. In the European Union, where regulations on their use are very tight, the number of non-human primates used in research has been in decline over the past decade. However, this decline has been paralleled by an increase in numbers used elsewhere in the world, with less regard for some of the ethical issues. There is evidence that researchers from high-income (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  28
    Rawlsian Justice and Non-Human Animals.Robert Elliot - 1984 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):95-106.
    In his book, A Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues against the inclusion of non-human animals within the scope of the principles of justice developed therein. However, the reasons Rawls, and certain commentators, have advanced in support of this view do not adequately support it. Against Rawls' view that 'we are not required to give strict justice' to creatures lacking the capacity for a sense of justice, it is initially argued that (i) de facto inclusion should be accorded (...) animals since their exclusion strains just institutions, and (ii) Rawls' account of the sense of justice has implicit and undefended human chauvinist elements. Two further counter-arguments are then developed in more detail. First, the suggestion that some non-human animals do have a capacity for a sense of justice is explored. Second, the suggestion that the capacity for a sense of justice is unrealised in so many human beings that Rawls' basis for marking out a special place for them is undermined is explored. Attention is next given to Rawls' characterisation of the participants in the original position. It is claimed that there are no good reasons for disallowing the possibility that these individuals turn out to be non-human animals in the real world. If sound, this claim brings non-human animals directly within the scope of Rawlsian principles of justice. The claim is defended against three objections. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  13
    Transcending the Human/Non-Human Divide: The Geo-Politics and Body-Politics of Being and Perception, and Decolonial Art.Madina Tlostanova - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):25-37.
    This article focuses on the analysis of the geo-politics and body-politics of being, and perception as the key concepts in the decolonial option grounded in the spatiality and corporeality of our cognitive and perceptive mechanisms. Revived spatiality refers in this case not only to a physical space that we inhabit but also to our bodies as specific spatial entities – the privileged white male bodies or the damned, non-white, dehumanized and often gendered and sexualized bodies from the underside of modernity. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  20
    Undetachable Concepts in Non-Human Animals.Laura Danón - 2018 - Philosophies 3 (2):14-0.
    In this paper, I would like to explore the idea that some non-human animals may be incapable of detaching or separating some of their concepts both from other concepts and from the larger thought contents that they are part of. This, in turn, will make it impossible for them to recombine these undetachable concepts with others in every admissible way. I will begin by distinguishing three different ways in which one concept may be undetachable from others, and I will (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  47
    An Ethical Sinngebung Respectful of the Non-Human.Clarence W. Joldersma - 2013 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 17 (2):224-245.
    In the following paper, I connect Levinas’s notions of il y a and hypostasis to nature as alterity via Sallis’s interpretation of nature in its return. I interpret Levinas’s idea of the elemental as an unpossessable milieu, an excess with indirect traces, indicating alterity, something strange. I then turn to Levinas’s idea of the ruin of representation to argue for a contextual reversal in which meaning arises from the non-human other. This reversal uncovers the possibility of understanding non-human (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  74
    What About Non-Human Life? An "Ecological" Reading of Michel Henry's Critique of Technology.Christina M. Gschwandtner - 2012 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):116-138.
    This paper takes its departure from Michel Henry’s criticism of a technological view that “extends its reign to the whole planet, sowing desolation and ruin everywhere” ( I am the Truth , 271). It argues that although Henry’s critique of technology is helpful and important, it does not go far enough, inasmuch as it excludes all non-human beings from the Truth of “Life” he advocates against the destructive truths of technology and therefore cannot fully articulate the way in which (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  45
    Prospects for an Inclusive Theory of Justice: The Case of Non‐Human Animals.Brian Berkey - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):679-695.
    In this article, I argue that there are three widely accepted views within contemporary theorising about justice that present barriers to accepting that non-human animals possess direct entitlements of justice. These views are that the basis of entitlements of justice is either contribution to a cooperative scheme for mutual advantage or the capacity to so contribute; political liberalism, that is, the view that requirements for coercive state action can be justified only by appeal to the ideal of citizens as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  8
    Political Liberalism, the Non-Human Biotic and the Abiotic: A Response to Simon Hailwood.Brian Baxter - 2006 - Analyse & Kritik 28 (2):190-205.
    S. Hailwood argues that if political liberals, in the Rawlsian sense, refuse to grant non-human nature anything other than instrumental value, then they may properly be characterised as human chauvinists, but not as inconsistent political liberals. He also argues that political liberals who do grant non-instrumental value to the non-human are thereby committed to a form of moral valuation of the abiotic. However, an analysis of what is involved in regarding non-human biota as possessing instrumental value reveals (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  22
    Non-Human Animals and Process Theodicy.Gary Chartier - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (1):3-26.
    I argue that that the suffering of non-human animals poses some potentially knotty difficulties for process theodicy. To respond satisfactorily to the problem of evil as it involves animals, process theists will, I argue, need either to defend some form of consequentialism or make a number of potentially plausible but certainly contestable empirical claims. I begin this internal critique by explaining the nature of the process response to the problem of evil. I explain how process thought can respond with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  11
    Lecture One: Rediscovering Darwin for Theology – Rethinking Human Personhood.J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen - 2017 - Hts Theological Studies 73 (3).
    In a series of three articles, presented at the Goshen Annual Conference on Science and Religion in 2015, with the theme ‘Interdisciplinary Theology and the Archeology of Personhood’, J. Wentzel van Huyssteen considers the problem of human evolution – also referred to as ‘the archaeology of personhood’ – and its broader impact on theological anthropology. These Goshen Lectures explore the potentiality that the history of human evolution provides bridge theories to theological anthropology and thus to a positive and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  17
    By Genes Alone: A Model Selectionist Argument for Genetical Explanations of Cooperation in Non-Human Organisms.Armin W. Schulz - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):951-967.
    I distinguish two versions of kin selection theory—a purely genetic version and a version that also appeals to cultural forms of cooperation —and present an argument in favor of using the former when it comes to accounting for the evolution of cooperation in non-human organisms. Specifically, I first show that both GKST and WKST are equally mathematically coherent—they can both be derived from the Price equation—but not necessarily equally empirically plausible, as they are based on different assumptions about the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  15
    Political Agency, Citizenship, and Non-Human Animals.Dan Hooley - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):509-530.
    In this essay I challenge the idea that political agency must be central to the concept of citizenship. I consider this question in relation to whether or not domesticated animals can be understood as our fellow citizens. In recent debates on this topic, both proponents and opponents of animal citizenship have taken political agency to be central to this question. I advance two main arguments against this position. First, I argue against the orthodox view that claims political agency is a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  2
    The Reification of Non-Human Nature.Teea Kortetmäki - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (4):489-506.
    Reification is a concept of critical theory that denotes certain problematic, habitualised forms of objectification. In this article, I examine whether the concept can be applied in environmental philosophy and what value it has for environmental critical theory. I begin by introducing the concept and the two senses in which reification of the non-human world has been discussed in the literature: first, denoting the misrecognition of others’ attitudes towards the natural world; and second, denoting a misconceived relationship between humans (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  11
    Non-Human Knowledge According to Michael Polanyi.Mihály Héder & Daniel Paksi - 2018 - Tradition and Discovery 44 (1):50-66.
    Three recent interpreters of tacit knowledge, Harald Grimen, Harry Collins, and John McDowell, either deny it is appropriate to attribute knowledge of any sort to animals or ignore the relevance of the tacit knowledge of animals to human knowledge. In this article, we seek to show that in Michael Polanyi’s understanding, tacit knowledge in animals underlies and supports human explicit knowledge. For Polanyi, tacit knowledge arises in increasingly complex forms in evolutionary history, and explicit knowledge emerges from it. Both forms (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 997