Results for ' nursing education'

983 found
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  1.  37
    Nurse Educators' and Nursing Students' Perspectives On Teaching Codes of Ethics.Olivia Numminen, Arie van der Arend & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (1):69-82.
    Professional codes of ethics are regarded as elements of nurses' ethical knowledge base and consequently part of their ethics education. However, research focusing on these codes from an educational viewpoint is scarce. This study explored the need and applicability of nursing codes of ethics in modern health care, their importance in the nursing ethics curriculum, and the need for development of their teaching. A total of 183 Finnish nurse educators and 212 nursing students answered three structured (...)
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  2.  6
    Can nursing educators learn to trust the world’s most trusted profession?Philip Darbyshire & David R. Thompson - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (2):e12412.
    Nursing and nursing education face a paradox whereby the world's most trusted profession seems not to trust its own students and practitioners. Much of nursing education has adopted what has been memorably described as the ‘cop shit’ approach. This is the panoply of surveillance, anti‐plagiarism and proctoring technologies that appear to be used more for policing and punishment of an inherently dishonest student body than to develop ethical and scholarly writing among future peers and colleagues. (...)
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  3.  10
    When nursing education becomes political: Norm‐critical perspectives in a campus‐based clinical learning environment.Ivan Andrés Castillo, Ellinor Tengelin, Susanna H. Arveklev & Elisabeth Dahlborg - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12597.
    Nursing education is in the process of incorporating critical thinking, social justice, and health inequality perspectives into educational structures, aspiring to help nursing students develop into professional nurses prepared to provide equal care. Norm criticism is a pedagogical philosophy that promotes social justice. This qualitative case study aimed to gain an understanding of and elaborate on an educational development initiative in which norm criticism was incorporated into the composition of a new campus‐based clinical learning environment for (...) education. By analyzing documents and interviews with the help of reflexive thematic analysis three themes were generated: “Intention to educate beyond nursing education,” “Educating in alliance with society,” and “The educative ambiguity of the Clinical Learning Centre.” The case study indicates that the incorporation of norm criticism into a campus‐based clinical learning environment may encourage nursing students to evolve social skills for nursing practice that support health equality within healthcare. By collaborating with society, nursing education can considerably improve its educational frameworks in alignment with societal demands. However, the inclusion of norm criticism in a setting such as a campus‐based clinical learning environment entails a clash with established institutionalized norms and being perceived as too proximate to politics. (shrink)
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  4.  13
    Continuing nursing education policy in China and its impact on health equity.Lily Dongxia Xiao - 2010 - Nursing Inquiry 17 (3):208-220.
    XIAO LD. Nursing Inquiry 2010; 17: 208–220Continuing nursing education policy in China and its impact on health equityThe aim of this study was to evaluate the mandatory continuing nursing education (MCNE) policy in China and to examine whether or not the policy addresses health equity. MCNE was instituted in 1996 in China to support healthcare reform was to include producing greater equity in health-care. However, the literature increasingly reports inequity in participation in MCNE, which is (...)
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  5.  36
    White dominance in nursing education: A target for anti‐racist efforts.Blythe Bell - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (1):e12379.
    Literature on racism, anti‐racism, whiteness, nursing education and nurse educators was reviewed and analysed for the development of race consciousness and application of anti‐racist pedagogy. The literature describes an oppressive educational climate for non‐white identifying people, a curriculum that does not attend to the social construction of difference, and a nursing culture that is not consciously situated in a broader sociopolitical context. A particular focus on studies of nurse educators demonstrates a stark need for personal and professional (...)
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  6.  6
    Digitalizing Nursing Education amid Covid-19.Anette Forss - 2023 - Techné Research in Philosophy and Technology 27 (3):387-404.
    The incorporation of digital technologies in higher education has become a research topic actualized by the Covid-19 pandemic, including the re-thinking of theories and ontological assumptions supporting the role of these technologies in blended learning. Using nursing education in urban Sweden as an example, I present a reflexive and postphenomenological analysis of critical incidents during the use of an online assessment software for high stakes exams during the Covid-19 outbreak. Based on the analysis, I argue that the (...)
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  7.  8
    Illuminating antiracist pedagogy in nursing education.Kechi Iheduru-Anderson & Roberta Waite - 2022 - Nursing Inquiry 29 (4):e12494.
    In the profession of nursing, whiteness continues to be deeply rooted because of the uncritical recognition of the white racial domination evident within the ranks of nursing leadership. White privilege is exerted in its ascendency and policy-making within the nursing discipline and in the Eurocentric agenda that commands nursing pedagogy. While attention to antiracism has recently increased, antiracism pedagogy in nursing education is nascent. Pedagogical approaches in the nursing profession are essential. Because it (...)
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  8.  2
    Carry on thinking: Nurse education in the Corporate University.Gary Rolfe - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4):e12270.
    It is widely acknowledged that the modern university can be traced back to the inauguration of the University of Berlin in 1810. In the subsequent two centuries, the idea of the university has taken on many forms, largely driven by the political concerns of the day and often in response to demands from the electorate for greater state regulation and accountability for public spending. Until recently, the responsibility for academic and social legitimation had shifted between the church, the state and (...)
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  9.  10
    Exploring nursing education: the case for poststructural inquiry.Nina Bruni - 1995 - Nursing Inquiry 2 (3):131-132.
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  10.  19
    The nurse educator as teacher: exploring the construction of the?reluctant instructor?Nina Bruni - 1997 - Nursing Inquiry 4 (1):34-40.
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  11.  11
    Exposing othering in nursing education praxis.Caitlin M. Nye, Mary K. Canales & Darryl Somayaji - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (3):e12539.
    This paper defines and analyzes the processes of “othering” as they manifest in the practice and praxis of nursing education. Othering is bound up in the establishment and reinforcement of norms, and shores up power inequities that negatively impact faculty, students, and patients. While previous analyses have addressed othering in nursing more broadly, this paper adds a consideration of the multiple processes of othering that operate within the context of nursing education spaces. Cases from recent (...)
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  12.  11
    Nurses Educated in Other Countries.Lynda Crawford - 2004 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 6 (3):66-68.
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  13.  17
    Cyberethics in nursing education: Ethical implications of artificial intelligence.Jennie C. De Gagne, Hyeyoung Hwang & Dukyoo Jung - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    As the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, particularly generative AI (Gen AI), becomes increasingly prevalent in nursing education, it is paramount to address the ethical implications of their implementation. This article explores the realm of cyberethics (a field of applied ethics that focuses on the ethical, legal, and social implications of cybertechnology), highlighting the ethical principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and explicability as a roadmap for facilitating AI integration into nursing education. Research findings suggest (...)
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  14.  20
    Ethics in Turkish Nursing Education Programs.Refia Selma Görgülü & Leyla Dinç - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (6):741-752.
    This descriptive study investigated the current status of ethics instruction in Turkish nursing education programs. The sample for this study comprised 39 nursing schools, which represented 51% of all nursing schools in Turkey. Data were collected through a postal questionnaire. The results revealed that 18 of these nursing schools incorporated an ethics course into undergraduate and three into graduate level programs. Most of the educators focused on the basic concepts of ethics, deontological theory, ethical principles, (...)
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  15.  17
    Ethics education: Nurse educators’ main concern and their teaching strategies.Khadije Jahangasht Ghoozlu, Zohreh Vanaki & Sima Mohammad Khan Kermanshahi - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (7-8):1083-1094.
    Background To practice nursing ethics, students must first understand the ethical concepts and principles of their profession, but despite this knowledge, students face challenges in implementing ethical principles in clinical settings. The educational performance of nurse educators is critical in resolving these challenges. This study focused on the lived experiences of nurse educators. Objective To address the main concern of educators when teaching ethics to undergraduate nursing students and how they deal with it. Research Design We conducted this (...)
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  16.  14
    Educational silos in nursing education: a critical review of practical nurse education in Canada.Diane L. Butcher & Karen A. MacKinnon - 2015 - Nursing Inquiry 22 (3):231-239.
    Changes to practical nurse education (with expanded scopes of practice) align with the increasing need for nurses and assistive personnel in global acute care contexts. A case in point is this critical exploration of Canadian practical nursing literature, undertaken to reveal predominating discourses and relationships to nursing disciplinary knowledge. The objectives of this poststructural critical review were to identify dominant discourses in practical nurse education literature and to analyze these discourses to uncover underlying beliefs, constructed truths, (...)
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  17.  22
    Different voices in nurse education.Gilian Stokes - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):494–505.
    Nurse educators, like many of their health care professional colleagues, frequently face moral dilemmas when they identify a student as presenting an unacceptable risk to public safety. In this situation, the statutory requirement of nurse educators to protect the public, under the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act , competes with the rights of the student to receive education under the Education Act . Using the different moral voices of justice and care, identified by Gilligan , this moral dilemma (...)
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  18. Ethical issues occurring within nursing education.Marsha D. Fowler & Anne J. Davis - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (2):126-141.
    The large body of literature labeled “ethics in nursing education” is entirely devoted to curricular matters of ethics education in nursing schools, that is, to what ought to be the ethics content that is taught and what theory or issues ought to be included in all nursing curricula. Where the nursing literature actually focuses on particular ethical issues, it addresses only single topics. Absent from the literature, however, is any systematic analysis and explication of (...)
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  19.  20
    Ethics in Nursing Education: Learning To Reflect On Care Practices.Linus Vanlaere & Chris Gastmans - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (6):758-766.
    Providing good care requires nurses to reflect critically on their nursing practices. Ethics education must provide nurses with tools to accomplish such critical reflection. It must also create a pedagogical context in which a caring attitude can be taught and cultivated. To achieve this twofold goal, we argue that the principles of a right-action approach, within which nurses conform to a number of minimum principles, must be integrated into a virtue ethics approach that cultivates a caring attitude. Ethics (...)
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  20.  62
    The relationship of ethics education to moral sensitivity and moral reasoning skills of nursing students.Mihyun Park, Diane Kjervik, Jamie Crandell & Marilyn H. Oermann - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):568-580.
    This study described the relationships between academic class and student moral sensitivity and reasoning and between curriculum design components for ethics education and student moral sensitivity and reasoning. The data were collected from freshman (n = 506) and senior students (n = 440) in eight baccalaureate nursing programs in South Korea by survey; the survey consisted of the Korean Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire and the Korean Defining Issues Test. The results showed that moral sensitivity scores in patient-oriented care and (...)
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  21.  4
    Creating & sustaining civility in nursing education.Cynthia M. Clark - 2017 - Indianapolis: Sigma Theta Tau International.
    Reflections on incivility and why civility matters -- The costs and consequences of incivility : rationale for change -- The inextricable link between stress and incivility -- The "dance of incivility and civility" in nursing education -- Raising awareness, naming the problem, and creating a vision for civility -- Principled leadership and the power of positive role-modeling and mentoring -- Pathway for fostering organizational civility : institutionalizing change -- Fostering effective and meaningful communication -- The first day of (...)
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  22.  28
    Ethical difficulties in nursing, educational needs and attitudes about using ethics resources.C. Leuter, C. Petrucci, A. Mattei, G. Tabassi & L. Lancia - 2012 - Nursing Ethics (3):0969733012455565.
    Ethical difficulties arise in health-care practices. However, despite extensive research findings that demonstrate that most nurses are involved in recurrent ethical problems, institutions are not always able to effectively support nursing care professionals. The limited availability of ethics consultation services and traditional nursing training fails to meet the frequent and strong requests by health workers to support their ethical dilemmas. A questionnaire was administered to 374 nurses attending a specialist training and a lifetime learning programme in Italy. The (...)
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  23.  17
    Different Voices in Nurse Education.Gilian Stokes - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):494-505.
    Nurse educators, like many of their health care professional colleagues, frequently face moral dilemmas when they identify a student as presenting an unacceptable risk to public safety. In this situation, the statutory requirement of nurse educators to protect the public, under the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act (2003), competes with the rights of the student to receive education under the Education Act (1989). Using the different moral voices of justice and care, identified by ), this moral dilemma is (...)
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  24.  5
    Professional values in student nurse education: An integrative literature review.Carolyn Antoniou, Ross Clifton & Valerie Wilson - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1323-1340.
    Aim The aim is to understand current research into the impact of undergraduate nursing education on the development of professional values. Background Values are evident in the professional standards for nurses and the guidelines and healthcare policies of many countries. These professional values guide decisions and behaviour and are recognised as an essential component in the professions ability to provide safe and professional care. This literature review presents the current research on the impact of education on professional (...)
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  25.  6
    Admission to undergraduate nurse education programmes: Who should be selected?Ann Gallagher & Fiona Timmins - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):3-6.
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  26.  16
    Ethical values in nurse education perceived by students and educators.Mahsa Boozaripour, Abbas Abbaszadeh, Mohsen Shahriari & Fariba Borhani - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (2):253-263.
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  27.  31
    Comparison of nurse educators' and nursing students' descriptions of teaching codes of ethics.Olivia Numminen, Helena Leino-Kilpi, Arie van der Arend & Jouko Katajisto - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (5):710-724.
    This study analysed teaching of nurses’ codes of ethics in basic nursing education in Finland. A total of 183 educators and 214 students responded to a structured questionnaire. The data was analysed by SPSS. Teaching of nurses’ codes was rather extensive. The nurse-patient relationship was highlighted. Educators assessed their teaching statistically significantly more extensive than what students’ perceptions were. The use of teaching and evaluation methods was conventional, but differences between the groups concerning the use of these methods (...)
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  28.  21
    Evaluating moral reasoning in nursing education.R. McLeod-Sordjan - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (4):473-483.
  29.  10
    Promoting moral imagination in nursing education: Imagining and performing.Darlaine Jantzen, Lorelei Newton, Kerry-Ann Dompierre & Sean Sturgill - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12427.
    Moral imagination is a central component of moral agency and person‐centred care. Becoming moral agents who can sustain attention on patients and their families through their illness and suffering involves imagining the other, what moral possibilities are available, what choices to make, and how one wants to be. This relationship between moral agency, moral imagination, and personhood can be effaced by a focus on task‐driven technical rationality within the multifaceted challenges of contemporary healthcare. Similarly, facilitating students' moral agency can also (...)
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  30.  30
    Exploring clinical wisdom in nursing education.A. McKie, F. Baguley, C. Guthrie, C. Jackson, P. Kirkpatrick, A. Laing, S. O'Brien, R. Taylor & P. Wimpenny - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):252-267.
    The recent interest in wisdom in professional health care practice is explored in this article. Key features of wisdom are identified via consideration of certain classical, ancient and modern sources. Common themes are discussed in terms of their contribution to ‘clinical wisdom’ itself and this is reviewed against the nature of contemporary nursing education. The distinctive features of wisdom (recognition of contextual factors, the place of the person and timeliness) may enable their significance for practice to be promoted (...)
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  31.  58
    Complexity in nursing education: Examples of the paradigm.Carey S. Clark - 2004 - World Futures 60 (5 & 6):371 – 388.
    Edgar Morin proposed that knowledge construction is best enacted via a complex and circular approach between both the part and the whole, while never enacting a strictly reductionistic or strictly holistic approach. It is the ability to connect and unite the parts within the whole via a dynamic circular process between the parts and whole that frees us from fragmented knowledge and helps us to bridge the gap between our seemingly disparate-competing nursing paradigms. This article examines the benefits of (...)
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  32.  13
    Research utilization and clinical nurse educators: a systematic review.Margaret Milner, Carole A. Estabrooks & Florence Myrick - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):639-655.
  33.  12
    Moral Distress and Nursing Education: Curricular and Pedagogical Strategies for a Complex Phenomenon.Sadie Deschenes & Cathryn van Kessel - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):63-72.
    Moral distress is a common phenomenon among nurses and is related to the complicated work environments and complex nature of ethical situations in day-to-day nursing practice. Moral distress impacts nurses as well as patient care and the health care system. Few strategies have been identified for instructors to effectively engage with learners when communicating about moral distress. We discuss two key curricular and pedagogical strategies that should be utilized when learning about moral distress: difficult knowledge’ and ‘terror management theory’. (...)
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  34.  11
    Cardinal John Henry Newman and ‘the ideal state and purpose of a university’: nurse education, research and practice development for the twenty‐first century.Gary Rolfe - 2012 - Nursing Inquiry 19 (2):98-106.
    ROLFE G. Nursing Inquiry 2012; 19: 98–106 [Epub ahead of print]Cardinal John Henry Newman and ‘the ideal state and purpose of a university’: nurse education, research and practice development for the twenty‐first centuryCardinal John Henry Newman’s book, The Idea of a University, first published in the mid nineteenth century, is often invoked as the epitome of the liberal Enlightenment University in discussions and debates about the role and purpose of nurse education. In this article I will examine (...)
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  35.  26
    The nature of reality represented in high fidelity human patient simulation: philosophical perspectives and implications for nursing education.Renee M. Dunnington - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (1):14-22.
    Simulation technology is increasingly being used in nursing education. Previously used primarily for teaching procedural, instrumental, or critical incident types of skills, simulation is now being applied to training related to more dynamic, complex, and interpersonal human contexts. While high fidelity human patient simulators have significantly increased in authenticity, human responses have greater complexity and are qualitatively different than current technology represents. This paper examines the texture of representation by simulation. Through a tracing of historical and contemporary philosophical (...)
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  36.  16
    Prescription Drugs and Nursing Education: Knowledge Gaps and Implications for Role Performance.Madeline A. Naegle - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (3):257-261.
    Nurses in all practice roles and settings need to understand the therapeutic use and potential for abuse of prescription drugs. Nursing roles, which include the administration and prescription of medication, health teaching and the implications of application, and the detection of drug-related problems, require that such education be timely and comprehensive. This paper discusses the state of knowledge dissemination about prescription drugs within the general context of nursing education. It highlights educational needs and explores the attitudinal (...)
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  37.  12
    Prescription Drugs and Nursing Education: Knowledge Gaps and Implications for Role Performance.Madeline A. Naegle - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (3):257-261.
    Nurses in all practice roles and settings need to understand the therapeutic use and potential for abuse of prescription drugs. Nursing roles, which include the administration and prescription of medication, health teaching and the implications of application, and the detection of drug-related problems, require that such education be timely and comprehensive. This paper discusses the state of knowledge dissemination about prescription drugs within the general context of nursing education. It highlights educational needs and explores the attitudinal (...)
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  38.  10
    Compassion, emotions and cognition: Implications for nursing education.Anne Raustøl & Bodil Tveit - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (1):145-154.
    Compassion is often understood as central to nursing and as important to ensure quality nursing and healthcare. In recent years, there has been a focus on strategies in nursing education to ensure compassionate nurses. However, it is not always clear how the concept of compassion is understood. Theoretical conceptualisations that lie behind various understandings of compassion have consequences for how we approach compassion in nursing education. We present some ways in which compassion is often (...)
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  39.  11
    Ethics in Hungarian nursing education programs.Adrienn Siket Ujvarine - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (5):696-697.
  40.  3
    Am I my students’ nurse? Reflections on the nursing ethics of nursing education.Paul Snelling - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):52-64.
    Despite having worked in higher education for over twenty years, I am still, first and foremost, a practicing nurse. My employer requires me to be a nurse and my regulator regards what I do as nursing. My practice is regulated by the Code and informed by nursing ethics. If I am nurse, practicing nursing, does that mean that my students are my patients? This paper considers how the relationship that I have with my students can be (...)
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  41.  12
    Human rights and nutritional care in nurse education: lessons learned.Elisabeth Irene Karlsen Dogan, Laura Terragni & Anne Raustøl - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):915-926.
    Background: Food is an important part of nursing care and recognized as a basic need and a human right. Nutritional care for older adults in institutions represents a particularly important area to address in nursing education and practice, as the right to food can be at risk and health personnel experience ethical challenges related to food and nutrition. Objective: The present study investigates the development of coursework on nutritional care with a human rights perspective in a (...) programme for first-year nursing students and draws upon reflections and lessons learned. Research design: The study utilized educational design research. The coursework, developed through two rounds, combined on-campus learning and clinical placement in nursing homes. Nursing studentsʼ perspectives and experiences gathered through focus groups and a written assignment informed the development and evaluation of the coursework. Participants and research context: In the first round, multistage focus group interviews were conducted with 18 nursing students before, during and after placement. In the second round, four focus group interviews with 26 nursing students were conducted shortly after placement. Ethical consideration: The study was approved by the Norwegian Centre for Research Data. Findings: Three main ʽlessons learnedʼ emerged regarding introducing a human rights perspective in nursing education: 1) the contribution of the human rights perspective in changing the narrative of ʽvulnerable and malnourished patientsʼ, 2) the importance of relationships and experiences for learning about human rights and 3) the benefit of combining development of ethical competence with a human rights perspective. Conclusion: A human rights perspective enabled the students to give meaning to nutritional care beyond understanding of food as a basic physical need. Incorporating human rights in nursing education can support nursing students and nurses in recognizing and addressing ethical and structural challenges and being able to fulfil the right to food for patients. (shrink)
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  42.  16
    Diagrams, images and conceptual maps in nursing education.Christine Durmis & Daniel A. Wilkenfeld - 2023 - Nursing Philosophy 24 (3):e12441.
    The way in which one understands information and concepts, and the way a student works to develop this, is an individual aspect of learning that cannot be universally defined as (at least manifested) the same for everyone. ‘Understanding’ is a broad term, and the way one achieves understanding is dependent on the way that material is presented. In this article, we argue that the philosophy of science can be important to nursing education—in particular, by showing that the way (...)
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  43.  25
    ‘Philosophy Lost’: Inquiring into the effects of the corporatized university and its implications for graduate nursing education.Rusla Anne Springer & Michael Edward Clinton - 2017 - Nursing Inquiry 24 (4):e12197.
    Drawing on a comprehensive, pan-national analysis of the corporatization of Canadian universities, as well as the notions of ‘parrhesiastic’ mentorship and practice, the authors examine the effects of the corporatized university, its implications for graduate nursing education and nursing's relative silence on the subject. With the preponderance of business interests, the increasing dependence of universities on industry funding, cults of efficiency, research intensivity, and the pursuit of profit so prevalent in today's corporatized university, we argue that philosophical (...)
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  44.  9
    Decolonisation for health: A lifelong process of unlearning for Australian white nurse educators.Elizabeth Rix, Frances Doran, Beth Wrigley & Darlene Rotumah - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12616.
    Indigenous nurse scholars across nations colonised by Europeans articulate the need for accomplices (as opposed to mere performative allies) to work alongside them and support their ongoing struggle for health equity and respect and to prioritise and promote culturally safe healthcare. Although cultural safety is now being mandated in nursing codes of practice as a strategy to address racism in healthcare, it is important that white nurse educators have a comprehensive understanding about cultural safety and the pedagogical skills needed (...)
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  45.  13
    Ethics education in nursing—structural characteristics and didactical implications of nursing education.Annette Riedel, Sonja Lehmeyer & Settimio Monteverde - 2022 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (3):387-406.
    BackgroundA special characteristic of nursing education is that professional teaching takes place in various locations. The learning locations involved (such as learning in theory, learning in clinical practice, or learning in third facilities, which are becoming increasingly popular, such as the skills lab) have an impact on and promote the development of ethical competences among prospective nursing professionals in various ways. Furthermore, it has become evident that the structural conditions that are specific to teaching and learning in (...)
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  46.  40
    Educational content in nurse education in Japan: A Delphi study.C. Ito, K. Ota & M. Matsuda - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (3):441-454.
  47.  19
    Nursing Leaders' Experiences With the Ethical Dimensions of Nursing Education.Mary Tod Gray - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (3):332-345.
    This pilot study explores four nursing leaders' experiences with the ethical dimensions of leadership in education. Gathering and interpreting such data of experience fosters greater understanding of the nature of moral leadership as it is lived in nursing education. A phenomenological approach was used to collect and analyze the data. The results revealed four major themes: integrity, justice, wrestling with decisions in the light of consequences, and the power of information. These themes clarify the values that (...)
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  48.  18
    Ethics in Hungarian nursing education programs.Adrienn Siket Ujvarine - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (5):696-697.
  49.  12
    Evidence-based Nursing Education for Regulation.Nancy Spector, Suling Li & Kevin Kenward - 2006 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 8 (3):84-86.
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  50.  13
    A National Survey of Nursing Education and Practice of Newly Licensed Nurses.Suling Li & Kevin Kenward - 2006 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 8 (4):110-115.
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