Results for 'pleasantness'

43 found
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  1.  60
    The Nature of Pleasantness.Olivier Massin - 2008 - Swiss Philosophical Preprints.
    Sometimes we say that pleasure is distinct form joy, happiness, or good mood. Some other times we say the joy, happiness or good mood are types of pleasure. This suggests the existence of two concepts of pleasure: one specific, the other generic. According to the specific concept, pleasure is one type of positive affects among others. Pleasure is to be distinguished from joy, gladness, contentment, merriment, glee, ecstasy, euphoria, exhilaration, elation, jubilation; happiness, felicity, bliss, well-being; enjoyment, amusement, fun, rejoicing, delectation, (...)
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  2.  33
    Odor Pleasantness and Intensity: A Single Dimension?Karl E. Henion - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (2):275.
  3.  10
    Magnitude and Category Scales of the Pleasantness of Odors.Trygg Engen & Donald H. McBurney - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (5):435.
  4.  11
    Odor Intensity and Pleasantness of Butanol.Howard R. Moskowitz, Andrew Dravnieks & Clifford Gerbers - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):216.
  5.  10
    The Role of Task Anxiety in Removing the Effects of Acquired Pleasantness in Paired-Associate Learning.Albert Silverstein - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (2):173.
  6.  6
    The Mere Exposure Effect Depends on an Odor’s Initial Pleasantness.Sylvain Delplanque, Géraldine Coppin, Laurène Bloesch, Isabelle Cayeux & David Sander - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  7.  18
    Crossmodal Effect of Music and Odor Pleasantness on Olfactory Quality Perception.Carlos Velasco, Diana Balboa, Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos & Charles Spence - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  8.  13
    Valence of Emotions and Moral Decision-Making: Increased Pleasantness to Pleasant Images and Decreased Unpleasantness to Unpleasant Images Are Associated with Utilitarian Choices in Healthy Adults.Martina Carmona-Perera, Celia Martí-García, Miguel Pérez-García & Antonio Verdejo-García - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  9.  24
    Acquired Pleasantness as a Stimulus and a Response Variable in Paired-Associate Learning.Albert Silverstein - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):534.
  10.  10
    The Nervous Correlate of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.Max Meyer - 1908 - Psychological Review 15 (4):201-216.
  11.  13
    Ignoring ''Brutal'' Will Make ''Numid'' More Pleasant but ''Uyuvu'' More Unpleasant: The Role of a Priori Pleasantness of Unfamiliar Stimuli in Affective Priming Tasks.Dirk Wentura - 2002 - Cognition and Emotion 16 (2):269-298.
  12.  5
    The Nervous Correlates of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.Max Meyer - 1908 - Psychological Review 15 (5):292-322.
  13.  12
    When Familiarity Breeds Contempt, Absence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder: Effects of Exposure and Delay on Taste Pleasantness Ratings.David J. Stang - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (3):273-275.
  14.  8
    A Note on Verifications of the Judgmental Theory of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.H. N. Peters - 1937 - Psychological Review 44 (6):533-535.
  15.  7
    The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity.Marcela Perrone-Bertolotti, Melanie Cerles, Kylee T. Ramdeen, Naila Boudiaf, Cedric Pichat, Pascal Hot & Monica Baciu - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  16.  7
    Acquired Pleasantness and Paired-Associate Learning in Mixed and Homogeneous Lists.Albert Silverstein - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):111.
  17.  5
    The Judgmental Theory of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.H. N. Peters - 1935 - Psychological Review 42 (4):354-386.
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  18.  5
    Sensitivity of Physiological Emotional Measures to Odors Depends on the Product and the Pleasantness Ranges Used.Aline M. Pichon, Géraldine Coppin, Isabelle Cayeux, Christelle Porcherot, David Sander & Sylvain Delplanque - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  19.  7
    Is the Acquired-Pleasantness Effect in Paired-Associate Learning Free From Confounding by Meaningfulness and Similarity?Albert Silverstein - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (1):116.
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  20.  4
    The Nervous Correlate of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.Charles Hughes Johnston - 1909 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (10):271-275.
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  21.  4
    A Hypothesis Concerning a Relationship Between Pleasantness and Unpleasantness.Y. Sagawa, H. Sawai & N. Sakai - 2002 - In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. pp. 33--325.
  22.  3
    Eyer's The Nervous Correlate of Pleasantness and Unpleasantness. [REVIEW]Charles Hughes Johnston - 1909 - Journal of Philosophy 6 (10):271.
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  23.  1
    The Psychology of Pleasantness.C. A. Ruckmick - 1925 - Psychological Review 32 (5):362-383.
  24. Reasons and Theories of Sensory Affect.Murat Aydede & Matthew Fulkerson - 2019 - In David Bain, Michael Brady & Jennifer Corns (eds.), The Philosophy of Pain: Unpleasantness, Emotion, and Deviance. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 27-59.
    Some sensory experiences are pleasant, some unpleasant. This is a truism. But understanding what makes these experiences pleasant and unpleasant is not an easy job. Various difficulties and puzzles arise as soon as we start theorizing. There are various philosophical theories on offer that seem to give different accounts for the positive or negative affective valences of sensory experiences. In this paper, we will look at the current state of art in the philosophy of mind, present the main contenders, critically (...)
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  25.  15
    Affect as a Function of Stimulus Variation.Paul C. Vitz - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (1):74.
  26.  19
    The Dimensional Analysis of a New Series of Facial Expressions.Trygg Engen, Nissim Levy & Harold Schlosberg - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):454.
  27.  13
    Can the Superior Learnability of Meaningful and Pleasant Words Be Transferred to Nonsense Syllables?Albert Silverstein & Richard A. Dienstbier - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):292.
  28.  5
    A Study of Chord Preference in a Group of Negro College Women.Oran W. Eagleson & Lillian E. Taylor - 1940 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (6):619.
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  29. Affect: Representationalists' Headache.Murat Aydede & Matthew Fulkerson - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (2):175-198.
    Representationalism is the view that the phenomenal character of experiences is identical to their representational content of a certain sort. This view requires a strong transparency condition on phenomenally conscious experiences. We argue that affective qualities such as experienced pleasantness or unpleasantness are counter-examples to the transparency thesis and thus to the sort of representationalism that implies it.
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  30.  87
    Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: An Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure is (...)
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  31.  29
    How Did They Say That? Ethics Statements and Normative Frameworks at Best Companies to Work For.Kristine F. Hoover & Molly B. Pepper - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (3):605-617.
    This empirical study explores aspects of how companies that are positively recognized by their workforce as “Best Companies to Work For” convey the underlying principles of their “trustworthy” culture. The study examines the normative ethical frameworks and affective language utilized in the ethics statements. Although multiple studies have considered normative ethical frameworks in individual ethical decision making, few have considered normative ethical frameworks in organization ethics statements. In addition, this study expands the analysis to include the ethic of care. Of (...)
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  32.  60
    Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a.James Warren - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison (...)
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  33.  83
    The Irreducibility of Pleasure to Desire.Olivier Massin - 2008 - Swiss Philosophical Preprints.
    One common answer to the question of the unity of pleasures is to try to define pleasantness by appealing to a kind of mental states whose unity is less questionable. Desires have been conceived as the best candidates for this unifying role. Indeed, one way of classifying the preceding options concerning the definition of pleasantness, is to constrast conative (or motivational) theories of pleasure with non conative ones. Conative theories of pleasure are often considered as one homogeneous type (...)
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  34.  10
    No Support for Dual Process Accounts of Human Affective Learning in Simple Pavlovian Conditioning.Ottmar V. Lipp & Helena M. Purkis - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (2):269-282.
    Dual process accounts of affective learning state that the learning of likes and dislikes reflects a learning mechanism that is distinct from the one reflected in expectancy learning, the learning of signal relationships, and has different empirical characteristics. Affective learning, for example, is said not to be affected by: (a) extinction training; (b) occasion setting; (c) cue competition; and (d) awareness of the CS-US contingencies. These predictions were tested in a series of experiments that employed simple Pavlovian conditioning procedures. Neutral (...)
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  35.  35
    Perceived Changes in Ordinary Autobiographical Events' Affect and Visual Imagery Colorfulness.Timothy D. Ritchie & Tamzin J. Batteson - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):461-470.
    We examined the extent to which the perceived changes in visual imagery colorfulness impact on the affect intensity associated with ordinary autobiographical events across time. We garnered support for the hypothesis that recent events become memorial phenomena via an emotion regulation process such that positive events retained their affective pleasantness longer than negative events retained affective unpleasantness because, in part, across 2 weeks the former retained their imagery colorfulness longer than the latter events did. A similar but distinct model (...)
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  36.  11
    A Computational Model of Argumentation in Agreement Negotiation Processes.Mare Koit & Haldur Õim - 2015 - Argument and Computation 6 (2):101-129.
    The paper describes a computational model that we have implemented in an experimental dialogue system. Communication in a natural language between two participants A and B is considered, where A has a communicative goal that his/her partner B will make a decision to perform an action D. A argues the usefulness, pleasantness, etc. of D, in order to guide B's reasoning in a desirable direction. A computational model of argumentation is developed, which includes reasoning. Our model is based on (...)
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  37.  30
    An Exception to Mental Simulation: No Evidence for Embodied Odor Language.Laura J. Speed & Asifa Majid - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (4):1146-1178.
    Do we mentally simulate olfactory information? We investigated mental simulation of odors and sounds in two experiments. Participants retained a word while they smelled an odor or heard a sound, then rated odor/sound intensity and recalled the word. Later odor/sound recognition was also tested, and pleasantness and familiarity judgments were collected. Word recall was slower when the sound and sound-word mismatched. Sound recognition was higher when sounds were paired with a match or near-match word. This indicates sound-words are mentally (...)
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  38.  33
    Memory Strategies Mediate the Relationships Between Memory and Judgment.Silvio Aldrovandi, Marie Poirier, Daniel Heussen & Peter Ayton - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    In the literature, the nature of the relationships between memory processes and summary evaluations is still a debate. According to some theoretical approaches (e.g., “two-memory hypothesis”; Anderson, 1989) retrospective evaluations are based on the impression formed while attending to the to-be-assessed stimuli(on-line judgment) – no functional dependence between information retrieval and judgment is implied. Conversely, several theories entail that judgment must depend, at least in part, on memory processes (e.g., Dougherty, Gettys, & Ogden, 1999; Schwarz, 1998; Tversky & Kahneman, 1973). (...)
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  39.  16
    ERP Differences Between Violence, Erotic, Pleasant, Unpleasant and Neutral Images.Kunaharan Sajeev & Walla Peter - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
    Introduction: There have been many concerns made about the non-conscious impact of exposure to violence and pornography. In our modern society where access to these stimuli is ubiquitous, the desire to investigate whether these concerns are apt is paramount. In the present Electroencephalography (EEG) study, baseline brain activity measures related to violent, erotic, pleasant, unpleasant and neutral images were taken, analysed and are shown. This forms the basis for further EEG measures related to those images after controlled exposure to violence (...)
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  40.  28
    A Computer-Aided Affective Content Analysis of Nanotechnology Newspaper Articles.Robert Davis - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (3):319-334.
    This paper explores the application of an affective content analysis to a selection of nanotechnology news articles gathered from selected newspapers. Thematic content analyses dominate current efforts to mine large text collections of popular science media; the addition of an affective analysis element can yield useful information to supplement future content analysis efforts. Using Whissell’s Dictionary of Affect in Language , the analysis rates news articles gathered over a twenty-two year period for their pleasantness, activeness, and imagery, determining the (...)
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  41.  2
    Good, Pleasure and Types of Friendships in Aristotle’s Eudemian Ethics.Maciej Smolak - 2016 - Peitho 7 (1):183-204.
    In EE H 2 Aristotle presents a typology of friendship starting from the puzzle whether the good or the pleasure is the object of love. But after indicating the reasons for loving and identifying three types of friend­ships he raises three important questions : whether there is any friendship without pleasure; how the hedonical friend­ship differs from the ethically friendship; on which of the two things the loving depends: do we love somebody because he is good, even if he is (...)
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  42.  7
    Internal Senses.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 564--567.
    The internal senses are a class of cognitive faculties that were posited to exist between external sense perception and the intellectual soul. The notion of internal senses was developed in the Arabic philosophy of the Middle Ages on the basis of certain ancient philosophical ideas. The classical list of five internal senses was provided by Avicenna: common sense, retentive imagination, compositive imagination, estimative power, and memory. He also localized these faculties in the three ventricles of the brain. According to Avicenna, (...)
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  43. Hedonic Value.Stuart Rachels - 1998 - Syracuse University.
    In this essay I support, develop and apply a theory of hedonic value. These tasks are interwoven, but principally, I support the theory in chapters 1-4, develop it in chapters 5 and 6, and apply it to a challenging cluster of problems in chapter 7. ;Sentient experience, I suggest in chapter 1, provides key evidence for founding ethics: a severely painful experience gives its subject evidence that it's bad in some way. Moreover, similar considerations, as well as analogies, support thinking (...)
     
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