Results for 'régulation'

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  1. Regulating Animal Experimentation.Regulations Governing - 2008 - In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. pp. 334.
     
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  2.  76
    Biological Regulation: Controlling the System From Within.Leonardo Bich, Matteo Mossio, Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo & Alvaro Moreno - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (2):237-265.
    Biological regulation is what allows an organism to handle the effects of a perturbation, modulating its own constitutive dynamics in response to particular changes in internal and external conditions. With the central focus of analysis on the case of minimal living systems, we argue that regulation consists in a specific form of second-order control, exerted over the core regime of production and maintenance of the components that actually put together the organism. The main argument is that regulation requires a distinctive (...)
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  3. Regulating Child Sex Robots: Restriction or Experimentation?John Danaher - 2019 - Medical Law Review 27 (4):553-575.
    In July 2014, the roboticist Ronald Arkin suggested that child sex robots could be used to treat those with paedophilic predilections in the same way that methadone is used to treat heroin addicts. Taking this onboard, it would seem that there is reason to experiment with the regulation of this technology. But most people seem to disagree with this idea, with legal authorities in both the UK and US taking steps to outlaw such devices. In this paper, I subject these (...)
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  4. Glycemia Regulation: From Feedback Loops to Organizational Closure.Leonardo Bich, Matteo Mossio & Ana M. Soto - 2020 - Frontiers in Physiology 11.
    Endocrinologists apply the idea of feedback loops to explain how hormones regulate certain bodily functions such as glucose metabolism. In particular, feedback loops focus on the maintenance of the plasma concentrations of glucose within a narrow range. Here, we put forward a different, organicist perspective on the endocrine regulation of glycaemia, by relying on the pivotal concept of closure of constraints. From this perspective, biological systems are understood as organized ones, which means that they are constituted of a set of (...)
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  5. Emotion regulation: Conceptual foundations.James J. Gross & Ross A. Thompson (eds.) - 2007
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  6.  41
    The Regulation of Cognitive Enhancement Devices : Extending the Medical Model.Hannah Maslen, Thomas Douglas, Roi Cohen Kadosh, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Journal of Law and the Biosciences 1 (1):68-93.
    This article presents a model for regulating cognitive enhancement devices. Recently, it has become very easy for individuals to purchase devices which directly modulate brain function. For example, transcranial direct current stimulators are increasingly being produced and marketed online as devices for cognitive enhancement. Despite posing risks in a similar way to medical devices, devices that do not make any therapeutic claims do not have to meet anything more than basic product safety standards. We present the case for extending existing (...)
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  7.  94
    Reconciling Regulation with Scientific Autonomy in Dual-Use Research.Nicholas G. Evans, Michael J. Selgelid & Robert Mark Simpson - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (1):72-94.
    In debates over the regulation of communication related to dual-use research, the risks that such communication creates must be weighed against against the value of scientific autonomy. The censorship of such communication seems justifiable in certain cases, given the potentially catastrophic applications of some dual-use research. This conclusion however, gives rise to another kind of danger: that regulators will use overly simplistic cost-benefit analysis to rationalize excessive regulation of scientific research. In response to this, we show how institutional design principles (...)
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  8.  8
    Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire.Wendy Brown - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Tolerance is generally regarded as an unqualified achievement of the modern West. Emerging in early modern Europe to defuse violent religious conflict and reduce persecution, tolerance today is hailed as a key to decreasing conflict across a wide range of other dividing lines-- cultural, racial, ethnic, and sexual. But, as political theorist Wendy Brown argues in Regulating Aversion, tolerance also has dark and troubling undercurrents. Dislike, disapproval, and regulation lurk at the heart of tolerance. To tolerate is not to affirm (...)
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  9. Attention Regulation and Monitoring in Meditation.Antoine Lutz, Heleen A. Slagter, John D. Dunne & Richard J. Davidson - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):163-169.
    Meditation can be conceptualized as a family of complex tial to be specific about the type of meditation practice emotional and attentional regulatory training regimes under investigation. Failure to make such distinctions developed for various ends, including the cultivation of..
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  10. The Regulation of Animal Research and the Emergence of Animal Ethics: A Conceptual History. [REVIEW]Bernard E. Rollin - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):285-304.
    The history of the regulation of animal research is essentially the history of the emergence of meaningful social ethics for animals in society. Initially, animal ethics concerned itself solely with cruelty, but this was seen as inadequate to late 20th-century concerns about animal use. The new social ethic for animals was quite different, and its conceptual bases are explored in this paper. The Animal Welfare Act of 1966 represented a very minimal and in many ways incoherent attempt to regulate animal (...)
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  11. Engineering Affect: Emotion Regulation, the Internet, and the Techno-Social Niche.Joel Krueger & Lucy Osler - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (2):205-231.
    Philosophical work exploring the relation between cognition and the Internet is now an active area of research. Some adopt an externalist framework, arguing that the Internet should be seen as environmental scaffolding that drives and shapes cognition. However, despite growing interest in this topic, little attention has been paid to how the Internet influences our affective life — our moods, emotions, and our ability to regulate these and other feeling states. We argue that the Internet scaffolds not only cognition but (...)
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  12.  74
    Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety?Susan Margaret Hart - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585-600.
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; Tombs, (...)
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  13. The Regulative and the Theoretical in Epistemology.Robert Lockie - 2014 - Abstracta 8 (1):3-14.
    The distinction between the regulative (‘practical’, ‘subjective’, ‘decision-procedural’) and the theoretical (‘objective’, ‘absolute’) pertains to the aims (the desiderata) of an account of justification. This distinction began in ethics and spread to epistemology. Each of internalism, externalism, is separately forced to draw this distinction to avoid a stock, otherwise fatal, argument levelled against them by the other. Given this situation however, we may finesse much partisan conflict in epistemology by simply seeing differing accounts of justification as answering to radically distinct (...)
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  14. Regulate Artificial Intelligence to Avert Cyber Arms Race.Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2018 - Nature 556 (7701):296-298.
    This paper argues that there is an urgent need for an international doctrine for cyberspace skirmishes before they escalate into conventional warfare.
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  15. Attention Regulation and Monitoring in Meditation.and Richard J. Davidson Antoine Lutz, Heleen A. Slagter, John D. Dunne - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):163.
  16.  14
    Regulation and the Social Licence for Medical Research.Mary Dixon-Woods & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):381-391.
    Regulation and governance of medical research is frequently criticised by researchers. In this paper, we draw on Everett Hughes’ concepts of professional licence and professional mandate, and on contemporary sociological theory on risk regulation, to explain the emergence of research governance and the kinds of criticism it receives. We offer explanations for researcher criticism of the rules and practices of research governance, suggesting that these are perceived as interference in their mandate. We argue that, in spite of their complaints, researchers (...)
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  17.  32
    Sweatshop Regulation: Tradeoffs and Welfare Judgements.Benjamin Powell - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):29-36.
    The standard economic and ethical case in defense of sweatshops employs the standard of the “welfare of their workers and potential workers” to argue that sweatshop regulations harm the very people they intend to help. Scholars have recently contended that once the benefits and costs are balanced, regulations do, in fact, raise worker welfare. This paper describes the short and long-run tradeoffs associated with sweatshop regulation and then examines how reasonable constructions of measures of “worker welfare” would evaluate these tradeoffs (...)
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  18. The Regulative Dimension of Folk Psychology.Victoria McGeer - 2007 - In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. pp. 137--156.
  19.  10
    Regulation, Normativity and Folk Psychology.Victor Fernandez Castro - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):57-67.
    Recently, several scholars have argued in support of the idea that folk psychology involves a primary capacity for regulating our mental states and patterns of behavior in accordance with a bunch of shared social norms and routines :259–281, 2015; Zawidzki, Philosophical Explorations 11:193–210, 2008; Zawidzki, Mindshaping: A new framework for understanding human social cognition, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2013). This regulative view shares with the classical Dennettian intentional stance its emphasis on the normative character of human socio-cognitive capacities. Given those similarities, (...)
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  20.  33
    Private Regulation and Trade Union Rights: Why Codes of Conduct Have Limited Impact on Trade Union Rights.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Jeroen Merk - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-13.
    Codes of conduct are the main tools to privately regulate worker rights in global value chains. Scholars have shown that while codes may improve outcome standards (such as occupational health and safety), they have had limited impact on process rights (such as freedom of association and collective bargaining). Scholars have, though, only provided vague or general explanations for this empirical finding. We address this shortcoming by providing a holistic and detailed explanation, and argue that codes, in their current form, have (...)
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  21.  20
    Regulation of Genomic and Biobanking Research in Africa: A Content Analysis of Ethics Guidelines, Policies and Procedures From 22 African Countries.Jantina de Vries, Syntia Nchangwi Munung, Alice Matimba, Sheryl McCurdy, Odile Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer, Ciara Staunton, Aminu Yakubu & Paulina Tindana - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):8.
    The introduction of genomics and biobanking methodologies to the African research context has also introduced novel ways of doing science, based on values of sharing and reuse of data and samples. This shift raises ethical challenges that need to be considered when research is reviewed by ethics committees, relating for instance to broad consent, the feedback of individual genetic findings, and regulation of secondary sample access and use. Yet existing ethics guidelines and regulations in Africa do not successfully regulate research (...)
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  22. Regulating Abortion After Ectogestation.Joona Räsänen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108174.
    A few decades from now, it might become possible to gestate fetuses in artificial wombs. Ectogestation as this is called, raises major legal and ethical issues, especially for abortion rights. In countries allowing abortion, regulation often revolves around the viability threshold—the point in fetal development after which the fetus can survive outside the womb. How should viability be understood—and abortion thus regulated—after ectogestation? Should we ban, allow or require the use of artificial wombs as an alternative to standard abortions? Drawing (...)
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  23.  33
    Regulating the Use of Cognitive Enhancement: an Analytic Framework.Anita S. Jwa - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (3):293-309.
    Recent developments in neuroscience have enabled technological advances to modulate cognitive functions of the brain. Despite ethical concerns about cognitive enhancement, both individuals and society as a whole can benefit greatly from these technologies, depending on how we regulate their use. To date, regulatory analyses of neuromodulation technologies have focused on a technology itself – for instance, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulation of a brain stimulation device – rather than the use of a technology, such as the use (...)
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  24.  27
    Meta-Regulation and Nanotechnologies: The Challenge of Responsibilisation Within the European Commission’s Code of Conduct for Responsible Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies Research. [REVIEW]Bärbel Dorbeck-Jung & Clare Shelley-Egan - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (1):55-68.
    This paper focuses on the contribution of meta-regulation in responding to the regulatory needs of a field beset by significant uncertainties concerning risks, benefits and development trajectories and characterised by fast development. Meta-regulation allows regulators to address problems when they lack the resources or information needed to develop sound “discretion-limiting rules”; meta-regulators exploit the information advantages of those actors to be regulated by leveraging them into the task of regulating itself. The contribution of meta-regulation to the governance of nanotechnologies is (...)
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  25.  53
    Regulation, Normativity and Folk Psychology.Victor Fernandez Castro - 2017 - Topoi 39 (1):57-67.
    Recently, several scholars have argued in support of the idea that folk psychology involves a primary capacity for regulating our mental states and patterns of behavior in accordance with a bunch of shared social norms and routines :259–281, 2015; Zawidzki, Philosophical Explorations 11:193–210, 2008; Zawidzki, Mindshaping: A new framework for understanding human social cognition, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2013). This regulative view shares with the classical Dennettian intentional stance its emphasis on the normative character of human socio-cognitive capacities. Given those similarities, (...)
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  26.  56
    Sweatshop Regulation and Workers’ Choices.Jessica Flanigan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):79-94.
    The choice argument against sweatshop regulations states that public officials should not prohibit workers from accepting jobs that require long hours, low pay, and poor working conditions, because enforcing such regulations would be disrespectful to the workers who choose to work in sweatshops. Critics of the choice argument reply that these regulations can be justified when workers only choose to work in sweatshops because they lack acceptable alternatives and are unable to coordinate to achieve better conditions for all workers. My (...)
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  27.  65
    Self-Regulation and Knowledge How.Elzinga Benjamin - 2018 - Episteme 15 (1):119-140.
    In the 1940s, Gilbert Ryle argued for anti-intellectualism about know how. More recently, new intellectualists have challenged the canonical status of Ryle's arguments, and in the ensuing debate Ryleans appear to be on their back foot. However, contributors on both sides of the debate tend to ignore or misconstrue Ryle's own positive account of know how. In this paper, I develop two aspects of Ryle's positive account that have been overlooked. For Ryle, S knows how to Φ iff (1) S (...)
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  28.  26
    Regulating Toxic Substances: A Philosophy of Science and the Law.Carl F. Cranor - 1993 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    In this book, Carl Cranor utilizes material from ethics, philosophy of law, epidemiology, tort law, regulatory law, and risk assessment to argue that the evidentiary standards for science used in the law to control toxics ought to be ...
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  29.  30
    Emotion Regulation Choice: A Conceptual Framework and Supporting Evidence.Gal Sheppes, Susanne Scheibe, Gaurav Suri, Peter Radu, Jens Blechert & James J. Gross - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):163-181.
  30.  32
    Regulating Sustainability in the Coffee Sector: A Comparative Analysis of Third-Party Environmental and Social Certification Initiatives. [REVIEW]Laura T. Raynolds, Douglas Murray & Andrew Heller - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (2):147-163.
    Certification and labeling initiatives that seek to enhance environmental and social sustainability are growing rapidly. This article analyzes the expansion of these private regulatory efforts in the coffee sector. We compare the five major third-party certifications – the Organic, Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, Utz Kapeh, and Shade/Bird Friendly initiatives – outlining and contrasting their governance structures, environmental and social standards, and market positions. We argue that certifications that seek to raise ecological and social expectations are likely to be increasingly challenged (...)
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  31. Handbook of Emotion Regulation.James J. Gross (ed.) - 2007 - Guilford Press.
    This authoritative volume provides a comprehensive road map of the important and rapidly growing field of emotion regulation.
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  32.  59
    Emotion Regulation: Past, Present, Future.James J. Gross - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (5):551-573.
  33.  53
    RNA Regulation of Epigenetic Processes.John S. Mattick, Paulo P. Amaral, Marcel E. Dinger, Tim R. Mercer & Mark F. Mehler - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (1):51-59.
    There is increasing evidence that dynamic changes to chromatin, chromosomes and nuclear architecture are regulated by RNA signalling. Although the precise molecular mechanisms are not well understood, they appear to involve the differential recruitment of a hierarchy of generic chromatin modifying complexes and DNA methyltransferases to specific loci by RNAs during differentiation and development. A significant fraction of the genome-wide transcription of non-protein coding RNAs may be involved in this process, comprising a previously hidden layer of intermediary genetic information that (...)
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  34.  37
    On the Self-Regulation of Behavior.Charles S. Carver - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a thorough overview of a model of human functioning based on the idea that behavior is goal-directed and regulated by feedback control processes. It describes feedback processes and their application to behavior, considers goals and the idea that goals are organized hierarchically, examines affect as deriving from a different kind of feedback process, and analyzes how success expectancies influence whether people keep trying to attain goals or disengage. Later sections consider a series of emerging themes, including dynamic (...)
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  35.  31
    Emotion Regulation Choice: The Role of Environmental Affordances.Gaurav Suri, Gal Sheppes, Gerald Young, Damon Abraham, Kateri McRae & James J. Gross - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (5):963-971.
    ABSTRACTWhich emotion regulation strategy one uses in a given context can have profound affective, cognitive, and social consequences. It is therefore important to understand the determinants of emotion regulation choice. Many prior studies have examined person-specific, internal determinants of emotion regulation choice. Recently, it has become clear that external variables that are properties of the stimulus can also influence emotion regulation choice. In the present research, we consider whether reappraisal affordances, defined as the opportunities for re-interpretation of a stimulus that (...)
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  36.  29
    Emotion Regulation in Depression: Relation to Cognitive Inhibition.Jutta Joormann & Ian H. Gotlib - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):281-298.
  37.  29
    Does Regulating Hate Speech Undermine Democratic Legitimacy? A Cautious ‘No’.Andrew Reid - 2020 - Res Publica 26 (2):181-199.
    This paper critiques the version of the argument that the regulation of hateful speech by the state undermines its democratic legitimacy made by Ronald Dworkin and James Weinstein. It argues that in some cases the harmful effects of hateful speech on the democratic process outweigh those of restriction. It does not challenge the central premise of the Legitimacy Argument, that a wide-ranging right to freedom of expression is an essential political right in a liberal democracy. Instead, it uses ideal and (...)
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  38.  55
    Regulating the Global Fisheries: The World Wildlife Fund, Unilever, and the Marine Stewardship Council. [REVIEW]Douglas H. Constance & Alessandro Bonanno - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (2):125-139.
    This analysis uses an analytical frameworkgrounded in political economy perspectives of theglobalization of the agro-food sector combined with acase study approach focusing on the Marine StewardshipCouncil (MSC) to inform discussions regarding thecharacteristics of societal regulation in thepost-Fordist era. More specifically, this analysisuses the case of the emergence of the MSC toinvestigate propositions regarding the existence of,and location of, nascent forms of a transnationalState. The MSC proposes to regulate the certificationof sustainable fisheries at the global level throughan eco-labeling program. The MSC (...)
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  39.  71
    Emotional Regulation and Responsibility.Tom Roberts - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (3):487-500.
    I argue that one’s responsibility for one’s emotions has a two-fold structure: one bears direct responsibility for emotions insofar as they are the upshot of first-order evaluative judgements concerning reasons of fit; and one bears derivative responsibility for them insofar as they are consequences of activities of emotional self-regulation, which can reflect one’s take on second-order reasons concerning the strategic, prudential, or moral desirability of undergoing a particular emotion in a particular context.
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  40.  49
    Regulation of the Neural Circuitry of Emotion by Compassion Meditation: Effects of Meditative Expertise.Antoine Lutz, Julie Brefczynski-Lewis & Richard J. Davidson - unknown
    Recent brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have implicated insula and anterior cingulate cortices in the empathic response to another’s pain. However, virtually nothing is known about the impact of the voluntary generation of compassion on this network. To investigate these questions we assessed brain activity using fMRI while novice and expert meditation practitioners generated a loving-kindness-compassion meditation state. To probe affective reactivity, we presented emotional and neutral sounds during the meditation and comparison periods. Our main hypothesis (...)
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  41.  25
    Regulation of Healthcare Ethics Committees in Europe.Norbert Steinkamp, Bert Gordijn, Ana Borovecki, Eugenijus Gefenas, Jozef Glasa, Marc Guerrier, Tom Meulenbergs, Joanna Różyńska & Anne Slowther - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):461-475.
    In this article, the question is discussed if and how Healthcare Ethics Committees (HECs) should be regulated. The paper consists of two parts. First, authors from eight EC member countries describe the status quo in their respective countries, and give reasons as to the form of regulation they consider most adequate. In the second part, the country reports are analysed. It is suggested that regulation of HECs should be central and weak. Central regulation is argued to be apt to improve (...)
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  42. Business Ethics as Self-Regulation: Why Principles That Ground Regulations Should Be Used to Ground Beyond-Compliance Norms as Well. [REVIEW]Wayne Norman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):43-57.
    Theories of business ethics or corporate responsibility tend to focus on justifying obligations that go above and beyond what is required by law. This article examines the curious fact that most business ethics scholars use concepts, principles, and normative methods for identifying and justifying these beyond-compliance obligations that are very different from the ones that are used to set the levels of regulations themselves. Its modest proposal—a plea for a research agenda, really—is that we could reduce this normative asymmetry by (...)
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  43.  31
    Regulating Genome Editing: For an Enlightened Democratic Governance.Giulia Cavaliere, Katrien Devolder & Alberto Giubilini - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (1):76-88.
    How should we regulate genome editing in the face of persistent substantive disagreement about the moral status of this technology and its applications? In this paper, we aim to contribute to resolving this question. We first present two diametrically opposed possible approaches to the regulation of genome editing. A first approach, which we refer to as “elitist,” is inspired by Joshua Greene’s work in moral psychology. It aims to derive at an abstract theoretical level what preferences people would have if (...)
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  44.  28
    Regulation During Challenge: A General Model of Learned Performance Under Schedule Constraint.Stephen J. Hanson & William Timberlake - 1983 - Psychological Review 90 (3):261-282.
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  45.  75
    Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research.Robert J. Levine - 1986 - Urban & Schwarzenberg.
    In this book, Dr. Robert J. Levine reviews federal regulations, ethical analysis, and case studies in an attempt to answer these questions.
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  46.  21
    Relational Regulation Theory: A New Approach to Explain the Link Between Perceived Social Support and Mental Health.Brian Lakey & Edward Orehek - 2011 - Psychological Review 118 (3):482-495.
  47. On Regulating What is Known: A Way to Social Epistemology.Steve Fuller - 1987 - Synthese 73 (1):145 - 183.
    This paper lays the groundwork for normative-yet-naturalistic social epistemology. I start by presenting two scenarios for the history of epistemology since Kant, one in which social epistemology is the natural outcome and the other in which it represents a not entirely satisfactory break with classical theories of knowledge. Next I argue that the current trend toward naturalizing epistemology threatens to destroy the distinctiveness of the sociological approach by presuming that it complements standard psychological and historical approaches. I then try to (...)
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  48.  4
    Dynamical Regulation of mRNA Distribution by Cross-Talking Signaling Pathways.Chunjuan Zhu, Guosheng Han & Feng Jiao - 2020 - Complexity 2020:1-11.
    Gene transcription is a random process in single cells manifested by the observed distribution of mRNA copy numbers in homogeneous cell populations. A central question is to understand how mRNA distribution is modulated under environmental changes. In this work, we initiate a theoretical study on mRNA distribution dynamics for the stochastic transcription model that involves cross-talking signaling pathways to direct gene activation in response to external signals. We first express the distribution in mathematical dynamical formulas under both moderate and high (...)
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  49.  5
    Self-Regulation Questionnaire in Spanish Adolescents: Factor Structure and Rasch Analysis.María Carmen Pichardo, Francisco Cano, Angélica Garzón-Umerenkova, Jesús de la Fuente, F. Javier Peralta-Sánchez & Jorge Amate-Romera - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  50.  1
    Regulating Animals with Gene Drive Systems: Lessons From the Regulatory Assessment of a Genetically Engineered Mosquito.Zahra Meghani & Jennifer Kuzma - 2018 - Journal of Responsible Innovation 5 (S1).
    For the purposes of conservation or suppression of species, gene drive technology has significant potential. Theoretically speaking, with the release of even relatively few animals with gene drive systems in an ecosystem, beneficial or harmful genes could be introduced into the entire wild-type population of that species. Given the profound impact that gene drives could have on species and ecosystems, their use is a highly contentious issue. Communities and groups have differing beliefs about nature and its conservation or preservation, as (...)
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