Results for 'reproductive strategy'

996 found
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  1.  29
    Individual Differences in Reproductive Strategy Are Related to Views About Recreational Drug Use in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan.Katinka J. P. Quintelier, Keiko Ishii, Jason Weeden, Robert Kurzban & Johan Braeckman - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (2):196-217.
    Individual differences in moral views are often explained as the downstream effect of ideological commitments, such as political orientation and religiosity. Recent studies in the U.S. suggest that moral views about recreational drug use are also influenced by attitudes toward sex and that this relationship cannot be explained by ideological commitments. In this study, we investigate student samples from Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan. We find that, in all samples, sexual attitudes are strongly related to views about recreational drug use, (...)
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  2.  16
    Male Reproductive Strategy and Decreased Longevity.Alexander E. Vinogradov - 1998 - Acta Biotheoretica 46 (2):157-160.
    An explanation of the inter-gender difference in longevity consistent with the 'disposable soma' theory of ageing is proposed. It is based on the concept of r-K selection as applied to the inter-gender situation. The concept predicts that the gender with a higher potential reproductive rate (males) should invest relatively less in somatic maintenance, which in its turn should result in a lower longevity according to the 'disposable soma' theory of ageing. In females, which are interpreted as K-selected organisms, the (...)
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  3.  15
    Secondary Sociopathy and Opportunistic Reproductive Strategy.Jay Belsky - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):545-546.
    Mealey's analysis of secondary sociopathy has much in common with Belsky, Steinberg, and Draper's (1991) evolutionary theory of socialization. Both draw attention to the potential influence of early rearing in the promotion of a cold, detached, manipulative, and opportunistic style of relating to others and, in so doing, raise the question of whether secondary sociopathy represents a facultative reproductive strategy.
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  4.  12
    Women and New Reproductive.New Reproductive - 1992 - In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 695--167.
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  5.  15
    The Limits Imposed by Culture: Are Symmetry Preferences Evidence of a Recent Reproductive Strategy or a Common Primate Inheritance?Lesley Newson & Stephen Lea - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):618-619.
    Women's preference for symmetrical men need not have evolved as part of a good gene sexual selection (GGSS) reproductive strategy employed during recent human evolutionary history. It may be a remnant of the reproductive strategy of a perhaps promiscuous species which existed prior to the divergence of the human line from that of the bonobo and chimp.
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  6.  4
    Intergenerational Context Discontinuity Affects the Onset of Puberty.Athanasios Chasiotis, David Scheffer, Ramona Restemeier & Heidi Keller - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (3):321-339.
    The assumption that the onset of puberty is a context-sensitive marker of a reproductive strategy is tested by comparing parental and filial childhood context and somatic development in West and East Germany. Sixty-eight mother-daughter dyads and 35 father-son dyads were taken from two samples of families from Osnabrück in West Germany and Halle in East Germany. According to the observed context discontinuity between the generations in the male dyads, linear regression models show that no indicator of male sexual (...)
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  7.  19
    Is Priesthood an Adaptive Strategy?Denis K. Deady, Miriam J. Law Smith, J. P. Kent & R. I. M. Dunbar - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (4):393-404.
    This study examines the socioeconomic and familial background of Irish Catholic priests born between 1867 and 1911. Previous research has hypothesized that lack of marriage opportunities may influence adoption of celibacy as part of a religious institution. The present study traced data from Irish seminary registries for 46 Catholic priests born in County Limerick, Ireland, using 1901 Irish Census returns and Land Valuation records. Priests were more likely to originate from landholding backgrounds, and with landholdings greater in size and wealth (...)
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  8. Sex Differences in Human Mate Preferences: Evolutionary Hypotheses Tested in 37 Cultures.David M. Buss - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):1-14.
  9. Reproductive Freedom, Self-Regulation, and the Government of Impairment in Utero.Shelley Tremain - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):35-53.
    : This article critically examines the constitution of impairment in prenatal testing and screening practices and various discourses that surround these technologies. While technologies to test and screen prenatally are claimed to enhance women's capacity to be self-determining, make informed reproductive choices, and, in effect, wrest control of their bodies from a patriarchal medical establishment, I contend that this emerging relation between pregnant women and reproductive technologies is a new strategy of a form of power that began (...)
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  10.  62
    Sex, Attachment, and the Development of Reproductive Strategies.Marco Del Giudice - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):1-21.
    This target article presents an integrated evolutionary model of the development of attachment and human reproductive strategies. It is argued that sex differences in attachment emerge in middle childhood, have adaptive significance in both children and adults, and are part of sex-specific life history strategies. Early psychosocial stress and insecure attachment act as cues of environmental risk, and tend to switch development towards reproductive strategies favoring current reproduction and higher mating effort. However, due to sex differences in life (...)
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  11.  19
    Anorexia: A “Losing” Strategy[REVIEW]Linda Mealey - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (1):105-116.
    Several theorists have tried to model anorexia on Wasser and Barash’s (1983) “reproductive suppression model” (RSM). According to the RSM, individual females adaptively suppress their reproductive functioning under conditions of social or physiological stress. From this perspective, mild anorexia is viewed as an adaptive response to modern conditions; more severe anorexia is viewed as an adaptation gone awry. Previous models have not, however, examined the full richness of the RSM. Specifically, Wasser and Barash documented not only self-imposed (...) suppression, but also manipulative reproductive suppression of subordinate females by dominants. I propose that the modern “epidemic” of anorexia is explained neither by adaptive self-suppression nor by environmental mismatch (an adaptation gone awry); I propose that the “epidemic” levels of anorexia seen in modern western society are a direct consequence of intrasexual competition, the scope of which has been enhanced by the power and reach of modern communications media. According to this perspective, anorexia, even in its mild forms, is a manipulative strategy imposed on subordinates by dominants. Anorexia is, in both senses, a “losing” strategy. (shrink)
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  12.  12
    Theatre and Research in the Reproductive Sciences.Jeff Nisker - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):81-90.
    This paper explores the power of theatre to engage the public and my personal journey using theatre as a research tool in reproductive science. I argue that the capacity of theatre to simultaneously engage the minds and hearts of audience members qua research participants affords audience members the capacity to provide researchers with insightful comments informed by the scientific, social and tacit knowledge derived from the performance, integrated with their lived experience. Theatre is a particularly important research strategy (...)
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  13.  4
    The Social Modes of Men.Lars Rodseth & Shannon A. Novak - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (4):335-366.
    Here we attempt to define a specifically human ecology within which male reproductive strategies are formulated. By treating the domestic and public spheres of social life as "ecological niches" that men have been forced to compete within or to avoid as best they can, we generate a typology of four "social modes" of human male behavior. We then attempt to explain the broad distribution of social modes within and between human groups based on the relative intensity of scramble and (...)
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  14.  10
    Male Reproductive Strategies in New World Primates.Karen B. Strier - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (2):105-123.
    Patterns of three variables of reproductive strategies in male New World primates are examined: (i) how males obtain access to potential mates; (ii) how males obtain actual mating opportunities; and (iii) how males affect infant survival and female reproductive success. Male opportunities to associate with females, whether by remaining in their natal groups, dispersing and forming new groups, or dispersing and taking over or joining established groups, are strongly influenced by local population densities and correlate with female (...) rates and the extent of female reproductive seasonality and synchrony. Differences in male mating success are affected by female accessibility, whether male-male and male-female relationships are hierarchical or egalitarian, and whether female reproduction is seasonally restricted. Patterns of male behavior toward infants, characterized as active assistance, overt interference, or benign tolerance, appear to co-vary with differences in the degree to which males can affect female reproductive rates.These qualitative analyses suggest that the reproductive strategies of male New World primates can be classified along a continuum ranging from conservative to daring depending on whether female reproductive rates are relatively slow or fast and whether reproduction is strongly or weakly linked to seasonal ecological variables. Males adopt the conservative strategy of staying in their natal groups, forfeiting exclusive mating opportunities, and treating infants with tolerance when female reproduction is constrained by ecological factors. Conversely, males adopt the more daring strategy of dispersing and competing when potential payoffs through their ability to affect female reproduction are high. (shrink)
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  15.  38
    Genetic Similarity, Human Altruism, and Group Selection.J. Philippe Rushton - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):503-518.
  16.  15
    Matrilineal Inheritance: New Theory and Analysis.John Hartung - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):661-670.
  17.  13
    An Evolutionary Analysis of Rules Regulating Human Inbreeding and Marriage.Nancy Wilmsen Thornhill - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):247-261.
  18.  26
    Attachment, Mating, and Parenting.Jay Belsky - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (4):361-381.
  19.  11
    Protecting the Right of Informed Conscience in Reproductive Medicine.R. Mirkes - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (4):374-393.
    This essay sets down three directives for conscientiously objecting clinicians—physicians, particularly obstetrician/gynecologists, trained in NaProTechnology by the Pope Paul VI Institute and Creighton University School of Medicine and any medical professionals who share their natural law vision of reproductive health care—to protect their right to well-formed conscientious objection in reproductive medicine. Directive one: understand the nature of a well-formed conscience and its rightful exercise. Directive two: fulfill all reasonable American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ requirements for conscientious refusal. (...)
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  20.  7
    First-time mothers’ experiences of pregnancy and birth following assisted reproductive technology treatment in Taiwan.Mei-Zen Huang, Yi-Chin Sun, Meei-Ling Gau, Shuby Puthussery & Chien-Huei Kao - 2019 - Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition 38 (1):10.
    Assisted reproductive technology treatment tends to involve significant physical and emotional commitments that can impact maternal, infant, and family health and well-being. An in-depth understanding of experiences is necessary to provide adequate support for women and their families during pregnancy and transition to parenthood following ART treatment. The aim of this study was to explore first-time mothers’ experiences of pregnancy and transition to parenthood following successful ART treatment in Taiwan. Twelve first-time mothers who conceived and gave live birth using (...)
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  21.  13
    Men in the Demographic Transition.Bobbi S. Low - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (3):223-253.
    Women’s fertility is the focus of most demographic analyses, for in most mammals, and in many preindustrial societies, variance in male fertility, while an interesting biological phenomenon, is irrelevant. Yet in monogamous societies, the reproductive ecology of men, as well as that of women, is important is creating reproductive patterns. In nineteenth-century Sweden, the focus of this study, male reproductive ecology responded to resource conditions: richer men had more children than poorer men. Men’s fertility also interacted with (...)
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  22.  11
    Intergenerational and Sibling Conflict Under Patrilocality.Ting Ji, Jing-Jing Xu & Ruth Mace - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):66-79.
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  23.  10
    Father Absence and Age at Menarche.Sabine Hoier - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (3):209-233.
    Life history data, attractiveness ratings of male photographs, and attitudes towards partnership and child-rearing of 321 women were used to test four evolutionary models (quantitative reproductive strategy, male short-age, polygyny indication, and maternal reproductive interests) which attempt to explain the influence of family composition on reproductive strategies. Links between early menarche and other markers of reproductive strategy were investigated. Childhood stress and absence of a father figure, whether genetically related or not, were found to (...)
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  24.  2
    Reproductive Strategies and Sex-Biased Investment.Susan Scott & C. J. Duncan - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (1):85-108.
    Sex-biased investment in children has been explored in a historic population in northern England, 1600 to 1800, following a family reconstitution study. An examination of the wills and other available data identified three social groups: the elite, tradesmen, and subsistence farmers. The community lived under marginal conditions with poor and fluctuating levels of nutrition; infant and child mortalities were high. Clear differences were found between the social groups, and it is suggested that the elite wetnursed their daughters whereas the elite (...)
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  25. Animal Rights and the Problem of R-Strategists.Kyle Johannsen - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):333-345.
    Wild animal reproduction poses an important moral problem for animal rights theorists. Many wild animals give birth to large numbers of uncared-for offspring, and thus child mortality rates are far higher in nature than they are among human beings. In light of this reproductive strategy – traditionally referred to as the ‘r-strategy’ – does concern for the interests of wild animals require us to intervene in nature? In this paper, I argue that animal rights theorists should embrace (...)
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  26.  7
    How Did Viviparity Originate and Evolve? Of Conflict, Co-Option, and Cryptic Choice.Alex T. Kalinka - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (7):721-731.
    I propose that the underlying adaptation enabling the reproductive strategy of birthing live young (viviparity) is retraction of the site of fertilization within the female reproductive tract, and that this evolved as a means of postcopulatory sexual selection. There are three conspicuous aspects associated with viviparity: (i) internal development is a complex trait often accompanied by a suite of secondary adaptations, yet it is unclear how the intermediate state of this trait – egg retention – could have (...)
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  27.  34
    Serial Monogamy as Polygyny or Polyandry?Monique Borgerhoff Mulder - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (2):130-150.
    Applications of sexual selection theory to humans lead us to expect that because of mammalian sex differences in obligate parental investment there will be gender differences in fitness variances, and males will benefit more than females from multiple mates. Recent theoretical work in behavioral ecology suggests reality is more complex. In this paper, focused on humans, predictions are derived from conventional parental investment theory regarding expected outcomes associated with serial monogamy and are tested with new data from a postreproductive cohort (...)
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  28.  6
    Family Background and Female Sexual Behavior.Sara Grainger - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (2):133-145.
    Since the seminal works of Draper and Harpending (1982) and Belsky et al. (1991) there has been considerable interest in the link between the family environment experienced as a child and consequent mating and reproductive strategy of females. In this paper, predictions from the hypothesis were tested using postal survey data from a cross-section of 415 women in Merseyside, UK. No relationships were found between father-absence, unrelated male-presence, parental divorce or parental death with age at first coitus, number (...)
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  29.  28
    Human Adoption in Evolutionary Perspective.Joan B. Silk - 1990 - Human Nature 1 (1):25-52.
    Exploitation is a fundamental element of the parental strategies of many species of birds. Cuckoos, for example, lay their eggs in the nest of other birds, who often unwittingly rear the alien nestlings as their own. Nest parasitism is an efficient reproductive strategy for cuckoos, who do not have to worry about building a nest, incubating their eggs, or feeding their nestlings. But not all hosts respond passively to such intrusions. In response to parasitic cowbirds, for example, robins (...)
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  30.  11
    Patterns of Characterization in Folktales Across Geographic Regions and Levels of Cultural Complexity.Jonathan Gottschall, Rachel Berkey, Mitchell Cawson, Carly Drown, Matthew Fleischner, Melissa Glotzbecker, Kimberly Kernan, Tyler Magnan, Kate Muse, Celeste Ogburn, Stephen Patterson, Christopher Skeels, Stephanie St Joseph, Shawna Weeks, Alison Welsh & Erin Welch - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (4):365-382.
    Literary scholars are generally suspicious of the concept of universals: there are presently no candidates for literary universals that a high proportion of literary scholars would accept as valid. This paper reports results from a content analysis of patterns of characterization in folktales from 48 culture areas, aimed at identifying patterns of characterization that apply across regions of the world and levels of cultural complexity. The search for these patterns was guided by evolutionary theory and the findings are consistent with (...)
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  31.  70
    Killing Babies: Hrdy on the Evolution of Infanticide. [REVIEW]Catherine Driscoll - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):271-289.
    Sarah Hrdy argues that women (1) possess a reproductive behavioral strategy including infanticide, (2) that this strategy is an adaptation and (3) arose as a response to stresses mothers faced with the agrarian revolution. I argue that while psychopathological and cultural evolutionary accounts for Hrdy's data fail, her suggested psychological architecture for the strategy suggests that the behavior she describes is really only the consequence of the operation of practical reasoning mechanism(s) – and consequently there is (...)
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  32.  30
    Attachment Styles Within Sexual Relationships Are Strategic.Douglas K. Symons & Alicia L. Szielasko - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):42-43.
    Del Giudice's examination of sex differences in reproductive strategy within an attachment context is well taken. Sex has been studied as behavior within romantic relationships, but attachment styles should also be reflected in strategic behavior within relationships that are sexual. This seems particularly true within adolescence, and sex differences may be better reflected as differences in correlation patterns of process variables than as main effects models.
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  33.  5
    Love Styles in the Context of Life History Theory.Andrzej Łukasik & Magdalena Marzec - 2017 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 48 (2):237-249.
    The evolutionary function of love is to create a strong bond between the partners with reproduction in view. In order to achieve this goal, humans use various sexual/reproductive strategies, which have evolved due to specific reproductive benefits. The use of particular strategies depends on many factors but one of the most important is early childhood experiences, on which life history theory focuses. John Lee identified 6 basic love styles: eros, ludus, storge, pragma, agape, and mania. Our goal was (...)
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  34. Victims of Trafficking, Reproductive Rights, and Asylum.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics.
    My aim is to extend and complement the arguments that others have already made for the claim that women who are citizens of economically disadvantaged states and who have been trafficked into sex work in economically advantaged states should be considered candidates for asylum. Familiar arguments cite the sexual violence and forced labor that trafficked women are subjected to along with their well-founded fear of persecution if they’re repatriated. What hasn’t been considered is that reproductive rights are also at (...)
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  35. Strategy-Proof Judgment Aggregation.Christian List & Franz Dietrich - 2007 - Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):269-300.
    Which rules for aggregating judgments on logically connected propositions are manipulable and which not? In this paper, we introduce a preference-free concept of non-manipulability and contrast it with a preference-theoretic concept of strategy-proofness. We characterize all non-manipulable and all strategy-proof judgment aggregation rules and prove an impossibility theorem similar to the Gibbard--Satterthwaite theorem. We also discuss weaker forms of non-manipulability and strategy-proofness. Comparing two frequently discussed aggregation rules, we show that “conclusion-based voting” is less vulnerable to manipulation (...)
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  36. Mind-Body Meets Metaethics: A Moral Concept Strategy.Helen Yetter-Chappell & Richard Yetter Chappell - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (3):865-878.
    The aim of this paper is to assess the relationship between anti-physicalist arguments in the philosophy of mind and anti-naturalist arguments in metaethics, and to show how the literature on the mind-body problem can inform metaethics. Among the questions we will consider are: (1) whether a moral parallel of the knowledge argument can be constructed to create trouble for naturalists, (2) the relationship between such a "Moral Knowledge Argument" and the familiar Open Question Argument, and (3) how naturalists can respond (...)
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  37.  18
    From Extrinsic Design to Intrinsic Teleology.Ignacio Silva - 2019 - European Journal of Science and Theology 15 (3):61-78.
    In this paper I offer a distinction between design and teleology, referring mostly to thehistory of these two terms, in order to suggest an alternative strategy for arguments thatintend to demonstrate the existence of the divine. I do not deal with the soundness ofeither design or teleological arguments. I rather emphasise the differences between thesetwo terms, and how these differences involve radically different arguments for the existence of the divine. I argue that the term „design‟ refers to an extrinsic (...)
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  38.  95
    When Suits Meet Roots: The Antecedents and Consequences of Community Engagement Strategy[REVIEW]Frances Bowen, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi & Irene Herremans - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):297 - 318.
    Understanding firms' interfaces with the community has become a familiar strategic concern for both firms and non-profit organizations. However, it is still not clear when different community engagement strategies are appropriate or how such strategies might benefit the firm and community. In this review, we examine when, how and why firms benefit from community engagement strategies through a systematic review of over 200 academic and practitioner knowledge sources on the antecedents and consequences of community engagement strategy. We analytically describe (...)
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  39. CSR Practices and Corporate Strategy: Evidence From a Longitudinal Case Study.Lucio Lamberti & Emanuele Lettieri - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):153-168.
    This paper aims to contribute to the present debate about business ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) that the Journal of Business Ethics is hosting. Numerous contributions argued theoretical frameworks and taxonomies of CSR practices. The authors want to ground in this knowledge and provide further evidence about how companies adopt CSR practices to address stakeholders’ claims and consolidate their trust. Evidence was provided by a longitudinal case study about an Italian food company that is one of the largest producers (...)
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  40.  37
    Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory.Sylvia Maxfield - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367-377.
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off between competitive (...)
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  41.  42
    The Revenge of Ecological Rationality: Strategy-Selection by Meta-Induction Within Changing Environments.Gerhard Schurz & Paul D. Thorn - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (1-2):31-59.
    According to the paradigm of adaptive rationality, successful inference and prediction methods tend to be local and frugal. As a complement to work within this paradigm, we investigate the problem of selecting an optimal combination of prediction methods from a given toolbox of such local methods, in the context of changing environments. These selection methods are called meta-inductive strategies, if they are based on the success-records of the toolbox-methods. No absolutely optimal MI strategy exists—a fact that we call the (...)
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  42.  17
    A General Framework for Understanding the Effects of Variability and Interruptions on Foraging Behaviour.John M. McNamara & Alasdair I. Houston - 1987 - Acta Biotheoretica 36 (1):3-22.
    A general framework for analysing the effects of variability and the effects of interruptions on foraging is presented. The animal is characterised by its level of energetic reserves, x. We consider behaviour over a period of time [0,T]. A terminal reward function R(x) determines the expected future reproductive success of an animal with reserves x at time T. For any state x at a time in the period, we give the animal a choice between various options and then constrain (...)
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  43.  31
    The Interactive Effect of Internal and External Factors on a Proactive Environmental Strategy and its Influence on a Firm's Performance.Bulent Menguc, Seigyoung Auh & Lucie Ozanne - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):279 - 298.
    While the literature on the effective management of business and natural environment interfaces is rich and growing, there are still two questions regarding which the literature has yet to reach a definitive conclusion: (1) what is the interactive effect between internal and external drivers on a proactive environmental strategy (PES)? and (2) does a PES influence firm's performance? Drawing on the resource-based view for the internal drivers' perspective and institutional and legitimacy theories for the external drivers' perspective, this study (...)
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  44. Antecedents of Corporate Scandals: CEOs' Personal Traits, Stakeholders' Cohesion, Managerial Fraud, and Imbalanced Corporate Strategy[REVIEW]Fabio Zona, Mario Minoja & Vittorio Coda - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):265-283.
    This study examines the antecedents of corporate scandals. Corporate scandals are defined as rare events occurring at the apex of corporate fame when managerial fraud suddenly emerges in conjunction with a significant gap between perceived corporate success and actual economic conditions. Previous studies on managerial fraud have examined the antecedents of illegal acts in isolation from strategic decisions and in terms of CEOs’ individual responses to the external context. This study frames the antecedents of corporate scandals in terms of the (...)
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  45.  73
    The Application of Stakeholder Theory to Relationship Marketing Strategy Development in a Non-Profit Organization.Simon Knox & Colin Gruar - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2):115-135.
    Non-profit (NP) organizations present complex challenges in managing stakeholder relationships, particularly during times of environmental change. This places a premium on knowing which stakeholders really matter if an effective relationship marketing strategy is to be developed. This article presents the successful application of a model, which combines Mitchell’s theory of stakeholder saliency and Coviello’s framework of contemporary marketing practices in a leading NP organization in the U.K. A cooperative enquiry approach is used to explore stakeholder relationships, dominant marketing practices, (...)
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  46. Wild Justice and Fair Play: Cooperation, Forgiveness, and Morality in Animals. [REVIEW]Marc Bekoff - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):489-520.
    In this paper I argue that we can learn much about wild justice and the evolutionary origins of social morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living animals, and that interdisciplinary cooperation will help immensely. In our efforts to learn more about the evolution of morality we need to broaden our comparative research to include animals other than non-human primates. If one is a good Darwinian, it is premature to claim that only humans can be empathic (...)
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  47. Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory.Robert S. Taylor - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its restriction. This tension between free (...)
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  48.  42
    Integrating Ethics and Strategy: A Pragmatic Approach.Alan E. Singer - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):479-491.
    An organizing framework is set out for the diverse literature on business ethics in relation to strategic management. It consists of sets of bi-polar components, spanning themes and topical themes, with a derived typology of contributions. Then, in the spirit of classical pragmatism, the organizing framework is re-cast as an integrative conceptual model of the strategy–ethics relationship. The approach recognizes that both pragmatism and dialectics can underpin progress towards integration, encompassing both normative and empirical aspects.
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  49.  47
    Corporate Social Performance as a Business Strategy.Nikolay A. Dentchev - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):395-410.
    Having the ambition to contribute to the practical value of the theory on corporate social performance (CSP), this paper approaches the question whether CSP can contribute to the competitive advantage of firms. We adopted an explorative case-study methodology to explore the variety of positive and negative effects of CSP on the competitiveness of organizations. As this study aimed at identifying as great variety of these effects as possible, we selected a diversified group of respondents. Data was thus collected through embedded (...)
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  50.  77
    Sociosexuality From Argentina to Zimbabwe: A 48-Nation Study of Sex, Culture, and Strategies of Human Mating.David P. Schmitt - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):247-275.
    The Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (SOI; Simpson & Gangestad 1991) is a self-report measure of individual differences in human mating strategies. Low SOI scores signify that a person is sociosexually restricted, or follows a more monogamous mating strategy. High SOI scores indicate that an individual is unrestricted, or has a more promiscuous mating strategy. As part of the International Sexuality Description Project (ISDP), the SOI was translated from English into 25 additional languages and administered to a total sample of (...)
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