Results for 'tragedy'

998 found
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  1. The Pleasures of Documentary Tragedy.Stacie Friend - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):184-198.
    Two assumptions are common in discussions of the paradox of tragedy: (1) that tragic pleasure requires that the work be fictional or, if non-fiction, then non-transparently represented; and (2) that tragic pleasure may be provoked by a wide variety of art forms. In opposition to (1) I argue that certain documentaries could produce tragic pleasure. This is not to say that any sad or painful documentary could do so. In considering which documentaries might be plausible candidates, I further argue, (...)
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  2. Game Theory and the Self-Fulfilling Climate Tragedy.Matthew Kopec - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (2):203-221.
    Game theorists tend to model climate negotiations as a so-called ‘tragedy of the commons’. This is rather worrisome, since the conditions under which such commons problems have historically been solved are almost entirely absent in the case of international greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, I will argue that the predictive accuracy of the tragedy model might not stem from the model’s inherent match with reality but rather from the model’s ability to make self-fulfilling predictions. I then sketch (...)
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  3. The Birth of Tragedy.Friedrich Nietzsche - 1967 - Oxford University Press.
    In The Birth of Tragedy Nietzsche expounds on the origins of Greek tragedy and its relevance to the German culture of its time. He declares it to be the expression of a culture which has achieved a delicate but powerful balance between Dionysian insight into the chaos and suffering which underlies all existence and the discipline and clarity of rational Apollonian form. In order to promote a return to these values, Nietzsche critiques the complacent rationalism of late nineteenth-century (...)
     
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  4. The Pleasures of Tragedy.Susan L. Feagin - 1983 - American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (1):95 - 104.
    I ARGUE THAT WE RECEIVE PLEASURE FROM TRAGEDIES BECAUSE WE ARE PLEASED TO FIND OURSELVES RESPONDING IN AN UNPLEASANT WAY TO HUMAN SUFFERING AND INJUSTICE. THE PLEASURE IS THUS A METARESPONSE, AND REFLECTS FEELINGS WHICH ARE AT THE BASIS OF MORALITY. THIS HELPS EXPLAIN WHY TRAGEDY IS SUPPOSED TO BE A HIGHER ART FORM THAN COMEDY, AND PROVIDES A NEW WAY OF SEEING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE MORALITY OF AN ARTWORK AND ITS VALUE.
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  5.  43
    Money and the Early Greek Mind: Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy.Richard Seaford - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    How were the Greeks of the sixth century BC able to invent philosophy and tragedy? In this book Richard Seaford argues that a large part of the answer can be found in another momentous development, the invention and rapid spread of coinage which produced the first ever thoroughly monetised society. By transforming social relations, monetisation contributed to the ideas of the universe as an impersonal system and of the individual alienated from his own kin and from the gods. Seaford (...)
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  6. Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological (...)
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  7.  50
    The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1993 - Penguin Books.
    Classic, influential study of Greek tragedy.
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  8.  66
    Information Technologies and the Tragedy of the Good Will.Luciano Floridi - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):253-262.
    Information plays a major role in any moral action. ICT have revolutionized the life of information, from its production and management to its consumption, thus deeply affecting our moral lives. Amid the many issues they have raised, a very serious one, discussed in this paper, is labelled the tragedy of the Good Will. This is represented by the increasing pressure that ICT and their deluge of information are putting on any agent who would like to act morally, when informed (...)
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  9. An Unrelieved Heart: Hegel, Tragedy, and Schiller's Wallenstein.Lydia L. Moland - 2011 - New German Critique 113 (38):1-23.
    In his early and unpublished essay on Schiller’s trilogy Wallenstein, Hegel criticizes the plays’ denouement as “horrific” and “appalling” and for depicting the triumph of death over life. Why was the young Hegel’s response to Wallenstein so negative? To answer this question, I first offer an analysis of Wallenstein in terms of Hegel’s mature theory of modern tragedy. I argue that Schiller’s portrayal of Wallenstein’s character and death indeed render the play a particularly dark and unredemptive example of modern (...)
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  10. Beyond Theodicy: The Divine in Heidegger and Tragedy.Robert S. Gall - 1985 - Philosophy Today 29 (2):110-120.
    The paper explores the way in which we can make sense of the seemingly contradictory presentations of God and the gods in tragic literature by looking to the thought of Martin Heidegger. The duplicity of the gods in tragedy is found to be a function of the uncertainty and questionworthiness of being.
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  11. Tragedy Off-Stage.Debra Nails - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
    I argue that the tragedies envisioned by the Symposium are two, both of which are introduced in the dialogue: (i) within months of Agathon's victory, half the characters who celebrated with him suffer death or exile on charges of impiety; (ii) Socrates is executed weeks after the dramatic date of the frame. Thus the most defensible notion of tragedy across Plato's dialogues is a fundamentally epistemological one: if we do not know the good, we increase our risk of making (...)
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  12.  42
    Hope and Tragedy: Insights From Religion in the Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur.Amy Daughton - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):135-156.
    The trajectory of Paul Ricoeur’s thought from the fallible to the capable human person offers a hopeful vision of human nature constitutive of our shared political life. Yet, by necessity, hope arises in response to the tragic, which also features in Ricoeur’s work at the existential and ethical levels. At the same time hope and tragedy represent concepts at the limit of philosophical reasoning, introducing meeting points with religious discourse. Exploring those meeting points reveals the contribution of religious thinking (...)
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  13.  90
    The Tragedy of the Digital Commons.Gian Maria Greco & Luciano Floridi - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):73-81.
    In the paper it is argued that bridging the digital divide may cause a new ethical and social dilemma. Using Hardin's Tragedy of the Commons, we show that an improper opening and enlargement of the digital environment (Infosphere) is likely to produce a Tragedy of the Digital Commons (TDC). In the course of the analysis, we explain why Adar and Huberman's previous use of Hardin's Tragedy to interpret certain recent phenomena in the Infosphere (especially peer-to-peer communication) may (...)
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  14.  66
    Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy.Dana LaCourse Munteanu - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of (...)
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  15. Acknowledgement and the Paradox of Tragedy.Daan Evers & Natalja Deng - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):337-350.
    We offer a new answer to the paradox of tragedy. We explain part of the appeal of tragic art in terms of its acknowledgement of sad aspects of life and offer a tentative explanation of why acknowledgement is a source of pleasure.
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  16.  36
    Crossings: Nietzsche and the Space of Tragedy.John Sallis - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Boldly contesting recent scholarship, Sallis argues that The Birth of Tragedy is a rethinking of art at the limit of metaphysics. His close reading focuses on the complexity of the Apollinian/Dionysian dyad and on the crossing of these basic art impulses in tragedy. "Sallis effectively calls into question some commonly accepted and simplistic ideas about Nietzsche's early thinking and its debt to Schopenhauer, and proposes alternatives that are worth considering."--Richard Schacht, Times Literary Supplement.
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  17. The Tragedy of the Commons as a Voting Game.Luc Bovens - 2015 - In Martin Peterson (ed.), The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Classic philosophical arguments. Cambridge University Press. pp. 156-176.
    The Tragedy of the Commons is often associated with an n-person Prisoner’s Dilemma. But it can also have the structure of an n-person Game of Chicken, an Assurance Game, or of a Voting Games (or a Three-in-a-Boat Game). I present three historical stories that document tragedies of the commons, as presented in Aristotle, Mahanarayan and Hume and argue that the descriptions of these historical cases align better with Voting Games than with any other games.
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  18. Grasping the 'Raw I': Race and Tragedy in Philip Roth's 'The Human Stain'.Lydia L. Moland - 2008 - Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities 2 (2).
    Philip Roth’s novel 'The Human Stain' recounts an instance of racial passing: its protagonist, Coleman Silk, is African-American but light-skinned enough to pass as white. Coleman’s decision to pass and his subsequent violent death, I argue, confront us with complex ethical questions regarding unjust social roles, loyalty, and moral luck. I also argue, building on Hegel’s definition of tragedy, that 'The Human Stain' is a particularly modern tragedy. The novel highlights conflicting role obligations, inadequate conceptions of freedom, and (...)
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  19.  81
    Nietzsche and The Birth of Tragedy by Paul Raimond Daniels.Vinod Acharya - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (2):294-300.
    Paul Raimond Daniels’s Nietzsche and The Birth of Tragedy is an engaging, instructive, and clearly written study of Nietzsche’s first book. It is a particularly fine achievement given the difficulties, in terms of both style and content, that Nietzsche’s text presents to the reader. Daniels’s aim is to present BT as an ideal introduction to Nietzsche’s philosophy, and, in light of its problematizing of the relation between art and truth, to argue that BT is crucial for evaluating the aims, (...)
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  20.  57
    Greek Tragedy and Political Philosophy: Rationalism and Religion in Sophocles' Theban Plays.Peter J. Ahrensdorf - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Oedipus the tyrant and the limits of political rationalism -- Blind faith and enlightened statesmanship in Oedipus at colonus -- The pious heroism of Antigone -- Conclusion: Nietzsche, Plato, and Aristotle on philosophy and tragedy.
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  21. Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2000 - Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure in (...)
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  22. The Inevitability of Evil and Moral Tragedy.Zachary J. Goldberg - 2016 - In Claudio V. Zanini & Lima Bhuiyan (eds.), This Thing of Darkness: Shedding Light on Evil. Interdisciplinary Press. pp. 47-58.
    Although Greek virtue theory, Kantian ethics, and utilitarianism contend that evil and moral tragedy can be avoided, my paper will argue that our recognition of their inevitability provides the only means toward taking full moral responsibility for one’s agency. It is especially tragic to observe that wrongdoing is often inescapable. An agent may have overriding moral reasons to pursue one course of action over another, and yet in making the morally best choice the individual nevertheless transgresses a moral value. (...)
     
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  23.  36
    Throne of Blood and the Metaphysics of Tragedy.Henry Somers-Hall - 2013 - Film-Philosophy 17 (1):68-83.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the metaphysical foundations of Throne of Blood , Kurosawa's reworking of Shakespeare's Macbeth . Using Hegel's theory of tragedy, I develop the distinction between Greek and modern tragedy, with their differing bases in ethical and subjective freedom. I then show that Noh drama also includes a very different metaphysical account, stemming from its theoretical roots in Buddhism. I then use these three differing accounts (Greek, modern and Noh drama) to explore (...)
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  24.  7
    Our Confrontation with Tragedy.Simon Critchley - 2019 - Philosophical Investigations 13 (28):59-74.
    This article attempts to illustrate our confrontation with tragedy in contemporary situation, That is why we are discussing this here in seven issues /Tragedy as a Dialectical Mode of Experience). Finally, this article seeks to show that tragedy is a way of experience in our life today. Key words: tragedy, philosophy, Greek.
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  25.  50
    Sublimity and Human Works: Kant on Tragedy and War.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 2:509-517.
    Kant admits that there are two kinds of human works that have something sublime about them, the work of the poet, e.g., tragedy, and the work of the politician, i.e., war. This paper will explore Kant's reasoning about the sublime element in these two human works.
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  26. The Passion of Infinity: Kierkegaard, Aristotle and the Rebirth of Tragedy.Daniel Greenspan - 2008 - De Gruyter.
    Introduction 1 -- Ancient Greece -- Reason and the irrational : Sophocles' Oedipus tyrannus -- Psuchê : literature and moral psychology from Homer to Sophocles -- Aristotle's poetics : Oedipus and the problem of tragedy -- Psuchê redux : philosophy and the new psychology -- Psychologizing Oedipus : reason and unreason in Aristotle's ethics -- Golden age denmark -- Kierkegaard's retrieval of Greek tragedy -- Tragedy as historical idea : either/or ancient drama reflected in the modern -- (...)
     
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  27.  20
    Tragedy and Grenzsituationen in Genetic Prediction.Kjetil Rommetveit & Rouven Porz - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):9-16.
    Philosophical anthropologies that emphasise the role of the emotions can be used to expand existing notions of moral agency and learning in situations of great moral complexity. In this article we tell the story of one patient facing the tough decision of whether to be tested for Huntington’s disease or not. We then interpret her story from two different but compatible philosophical entry points: Aristotle’s conception of Greek tragedy and Karl Jaspers’ notion of Grenzsituationen (boundary situations). We continue by (...)
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  28.  47
    Tragedy or Religion? A Question of "Radical Hermeneutics".Robert S. Gall - 1988 - Philosophy Today 32 (3):244-255.
    The paper criticizes John Caputo's formulation of "radical hermeneutics" and its understanding of both religion and tragedy, arguing that a "tragic theology" would be a truly radical hermeneutic.
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  29.  21
    The Whole Comedy and Tragedy of Philosophy: On Aristophanes' Speech in Plato's Symposium.Drew A. Hyland - 2013 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 48 (1):6-18.
    In this essay, I approach the question of comedy and tragedy, as well as their relation to philosophy, in the Platonic dialogues through a focus on the comic poet Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. I elicit both the positive contribution of the poet’s speech as well as its limitations for an understanding of comedy, tragedy, and philosophy.
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  30.  49
    Tragic Representation: Paul Klee on Tragedy and Art.María del Rosario Acosta López - 2013 - Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):443-461.
    This paper traces and examines the different connotations given to the notion of “tragedy” in Paul Klee’s thought. From his early reflections on, Klee relates this notion to an intermediate and conflictive condition that characterizes human existence—an existence that takes place between heaven and earth, between the ethereal and the earthly. This essay focuses on how the connotations Klee gives to tragedy in different moments of his reflections transform the way he conceives the work of art. Hence, I (...)
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  31.  25
    Philosophy's Tragedy.Andrew Cooper - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):59-74.
    Is tragedy, as Nietzsche declared, dead? In recent years many philosophers have reconsidered tragedy's relation to philosophy. While tragedy is deemed to contain important lessons for philosophy, there is a consensus that it remains a thing of the past. This article calls this consensus into question, arguing that it reifies tragedy, keeping tragedy at arm's length. With the interest of identifying the necessity of tragedy to philosophy, it draws from Quentin Skinner to put forward (...)
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  32.  12
    Emotion, Tragedy, and Insight.Stephen Leighton - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (9).
    The present study considers whether poetry is capable of providing insight that can illuminate our lives, doing so from the perspective of Aristotle’s understanding of tragedy, fear, and the emotions more generally. It argues that and explains how fear as understood by Aristotle can foster insight in a tragedy’s audience, depicts the nature and the bases for such insight, and suggests several ways in which insight that fear can bring to tragedy can be especially or particularly illuminating. (...)
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  33.  46
    For Neoclassical Tragedy: György Lukács’s Drama Book.Lee Congdon - 2008 - Studies in East European Thought 60 (1-2):45 - 54.
    Before he joined the Communist Party, the young György Lukács published an outstanding history of the modern drama in which he combined sociological analysis with aesthetic judgment. By doing so he called his countrymen's attention to a new and insightful approach to the study of literature. At the same time, he made a strong case for the superiority of neoclassical tragedy—largely inspired by personal experience.
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  34.  4
    Tragedy and Psychoanalysis: An Unfinished Archeology.Elzilaine Domingues Mendes & Terezinha de Camargo Viana - 2010 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 4:53-63.
    The goal of this work is writing about the importance of the poetic art, especially the tragedy to understand the psyche. The literature, besides showing an epoch, represents in a clear and poetic way the human conflicts. To reach this goal, we went through some literary works – Edipo King, by Sofocles, Hamlet and Macbeth by Shakespeare; Goriot Father by Balzac; Twenty Four Hours in a Woman’s Life by Stefan Zweig – extracting from them some fragments in which human (...)
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  35.  79
    Nietzsche on Tragedy.M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest (and extraordinary) book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872). When he wrote it, Nietzsche was a Greek scholar, a friend and champion of Wagner, and a philosopher in the making. His book has been very influential and widely read, but has always posed great difficulties for readers because of the particular way Nietzsche brings his ancient and modern interests together. The proper appreciation of such a work requires access to ideas that (...)
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  36.  14
    The Tragedy of the Few.Theresa Scavenius - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):53-65.
    In this article I elaborate and defend a rights-based understanding of climate politics, that is, one that takes climate politics to concern the rights to access of natural resources as opposed to people’s economic incentives. The argument contains two parts. The first is negative: to demonstrate that the tragedy of the commons as a story of climate change is inadequate. The second is positive: to suggest a more satisfactory framework, which I call the tragedy of the few. In (...)
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  37.  20
    Aristotelian Reflections on Horror and Tragedy in an American Werewolf in London and the Sixth Sense.Angela Curran - 2003 - In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press. pp. 47--64.
    Can horror films be tragic? From an Aristotelian point of view, the answer would seem to be no. For it is hard to see how a film that places a monster at the center of the plot could evoke pity and fear in the audience. This paper argues that some films belong to both horror and tragedy, and so can be accommodated as tragedies according to Aristotle's framework in the Poetics.
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  38.  1
    A Theory of Tragedy in Cornelius Castoriadis.María Cecilia Padilla - 2020 - Las Torres de Lucca. International Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (16):83-106.
    Towards the end of his philosophical and political theorizations, the Greek-born French philosopher and thinker Cornelius Castoriadis turned his attention to artistic representation, in particular to Greek, or to use a term he preferred, “Athenian” tragedy. The aim of this article is to analyze the role played by his interpretation of tragedy in his understanding of democracy as a tragic regime. In order to address this interrogation, the article will be divided in three parts. The first part is (...)
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  39. The Instruction of Philosophy and Psychoanalysis by Tragedy: Jacques Lacan and Gabriel Marcel Read Paul Claudel.Ann Bugliani - 1998 - International Scholars Publications.
    This powerful study is based on the premise that literary theory is important because literature is important. Bugliani explores the intersection of tragedy with philosophy and psychoanalysis. A threefold purpose is evident: to examine the tension between philosophy and literature, to discuss the teaching of tragedy and finally to discuss that teaching in the works of Lacan, Marcel and, above all, Paul Claudel.
     
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  40.  46
    The Locus of Tragedy.Arthur Cools (ed.) - 2008 - Brill.
    This book wants to open a contemporary philosophical perspective on the tragic. What is the locus of tragedy?
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  41. Tragedy and Reparation.Elisa Galgut - 2009 - In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The Kleinian psychoanalyst Hanna Segal argues for the reparative nature of art, and especially of the genre of classical tragedy. According to Kleinian theory, healthy psychological development requires that early infantile aggressive and destructive emotions are worked through; such “working through” is necessary for the development of conscience, for feelings of empathy, as well as for cognitive development. It is also a necessary condition for creative activity. Segal examines the roots of the impulse to create by looking specifically at (...)
     
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  42.  19
    Tragedy and Comedy: A Systematic Study and a Critique of Hegel.Mark William Roche - 1997 - State University of New York Press.
    The first evaluation and critique of Hegel's theory of tragedy and comedy, this book also develops an original theory of both genres.
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  43. Nietzsche on Tragedy.M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    The first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest book, The Birth of Tragedy, this important volume by M. S. Silk and J. P. Stern examines the work in detail: its place in Nietzsche's philosophical career; its value as an account of ancient Greek culture; its place in the history of German ideas, and its value as a theory of tragedy and music. Presented in a fresh twenty-first-century series livery, and including a specially commissioned preface written by Lesley Chamberlain, illuminating (...)
     
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  44.  87
    The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1986 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of Greek (...)
  45. Iris Murdoch’s The Bell: Tragedy, Love, and Religion.Kenneth Masong - 2008 - Kritike 2 (1):11-30.
    The novel begins as follows:"Dora Greenfield left her husband because she was afraid of him. She decided six months later to return to him for the same reason. The absent Paul, haunting her with letters and telephone bells and imagined footsteps on the stairs had begun to be the greater torment. Dora suffered from guilt, and with guilt came fear. She decided at last that the persecution of his presence was to be preferred to the persecution of his absence."Murdoch's novel (...)
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  46.  28
    The Birth of Tragedy ; and, the Genealogy of Morals.FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE - 1956 - N.Y.: Anchor Books.
    Skillful, sophisticated translations of two of Nietzsche's essential works about the conflict between the moral and aesthetic approaches to life, the impact of Christianity on human values, the meaning of science, the contrast between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, and other themes central to his thinking.
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  47.  24
    Antibiotic Resistance as a Tragedy of the Commons: An Ethical Argument for a Tax on Antibiotic Use in Humans.Alberto Giubilini - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):776-784.
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  48. The Birth of Tragedy and the Case of Wagner.Friedrich Nietzsche - 1967 - Vintage Books.
     
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  49.  25
    Playing with Models and Optimization to Overcome the Tragedy of the Commons in Groundwater.O. López-Corona, P. Padilla, O. Escolero, F. Armas, R. García-Arrazola & R. Esparza - 2014 - Complexity 19 (1):9-21.
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  50. Myth and Tragedy in Ancient Greece.Jean-Pierre Vernant & Pierre Vidal-Naquet - 1990 - Zone Books.
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