Results for '"early phenomenology"'

56 found
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  1.  71
    Envy and Ressentiment, a Difference in Kind: A Critique and Renewal of Scheler's Phenomenological Account - See More At: Http://Www.Bloomsbury.Com/Us/Early-Phenomenology-9781474276047/#Sthash.jLOTi3Tn.Dpuf.Michael R. Kelly - 2016 - In Brian Harding & Michael Kelly (eds.), Early Phenomenology. Bloomsbury Academic.
  2.  36
    The Paradox of Objectless Presentations in Early Phenomenology: A Brief History of the Intentional Object From Bolzano to Husserl With Concise Analyses of the Positions of Brentano, Frege, Twardowski and Meinong.George Heffernan - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:67-91.
    This paper explores the close connection in early phenomenology between the problem of objectless presentations and the concept of intentional objects. It clarifies how this basic concept of Husserl’s early phenomenology emerged within the horizons of Bolzano’s logical objectivism, Brentano’s descriptive psychology, Frege’s mathematical logicism, Twardowski’s psychological representationalism, and Meinong’s object theory. It shows how in collaboration with these thinkers Husserl argued that a theory of intentionality is incomplete without a concept of the intentional object. It provides a brief history (...)
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  3.  34
    The Emotions in Early Phenomenology.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:349-374.
    This paper off ers an overview of certain key features of the accounts of emotion defended by the early phenomenologists. After briefly presenting the movement of early phenomenology and describing its historical context, I shall elaborate the main claims about the emotions defended by this group, articulating them through the following five topics: 1) the stratification of emotional life; 2) the qualitative aspect of emotional experience; 3) the foundation of the emotions in cognitive acts; 4) the intentionality of feeling and (...)
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  4.  12
    Toward an Engaged Account of Objectivity: Contributions From Early Phenomenology.Amanda Gibeault - unknown
    In this dissertation, I develop an engaged understanding of objectivity, or good knowledge practices. I argue that for knowledge practices to be good, they must both be truth-conducive and engaged, that is, explicitly implicated in the critical appraisal of background values and assumptions. I pursue this argument in six stages. First, I consider work in epistemology that countenances a place for values in objectivity. I conclude from this that truth-conduciveness is not sufficient for objectivity, and that a social approach to (...)
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  5.  24
    Early Phenomenology: Metaphysics, Ethics and the Philosophy of Religion.Michael R. Kelly & Brian Harding (eds.) - 2016 - London: Bloomsbury.
    [From the publisher]Taking the term “phenomenologist” in a fairly broad sense, Early Phenomenology focuses on those early exponents of the intellectual discipline, such as Buber, Ortega and Scheler rather than those thinkers that would later eclipse them; indeed the volume precisely means to bring into question what it means to be a phenomenologist, a category that becomes increasingly more fluid the more we distance ourselves from the gravitational pull of philosophical giants Husserl and Heidegger. In focusing on early phenomenology this (...)
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  6. The Emotions in Early Phenomenology.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:349-374.
    This paper off ers an overview of certain key features of the accounts of emotion defended by the early phenomenologists. After briefly presenting the movement of early phenomenology and describing its historical context, I shall elaborate the main claims about the emotions defended by this group, articulating them through the following five topics: 1) the stratification of emotional life; 2) the qualitative aspect of emotional experience; 3) the foundation of the emotions in cognitive acts; 4) the intentionality of feeling and (...)
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  7.  21
    The Anachronous Other: Empathy and Transference in Early Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis.Joona Taipale - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:331-348.
    This article discusses our experience of other people from both phenomenological and psychoanalytic perspectives. Drawing on Husserl and Freud, I will distinguish between different temporal modes of the other: while Husserl carefully examines the ways in which others are constituted as synchronous or as asynchronous, Freud underlines that others may also appear in a temporally displaced, anachronous manner, whereby one’s experience of some past other dominates in the experience of the present other. Freud discusses this third kind of relationship to (...)
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  8.  29
    Syntactic Reduction in Husserl’s Early Phenomenology of Arithmetic.Mirja Hartimo & Mitsuhiro Okada - 2016 - Synthese 193 (3):937-969.
    The paper traces the development and the role of syntactic reduction in Edmund Husserl’s early writings on mathematics and logic, especially on arithmetic. The notion has its origin in Hermann Hankel’s principle of permanence that Husserl set out to clarify. In Husserl’s early texts the emphasis of the reductions was meant to guarantee the consistency of the extended algorithm. Around the turn of the century Husserl uses the same idea in his conception of definiteness of what he calls “mathematical manifolds.” (...)
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  9.  56
    The Project of Ethical Renewal and Critique: Edmund Husserl's Early Phenomenology of Culture.Anthony J. Steinbock - 1994 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):449-464.
    "Renewal" is the expression Edmund Husserl used for the social, political, and ethical transformation of human culture (1922-1924). Considering the concept of renewal in the "generative" becoming of a culture, I first explain the phenomenological background in which Husserl approached the enterprise of renewal. I then describe Husserl's concept of renewal as an ethical task. Next, I take up the process of renewal as accomplishing "the best possible." Following this, I discuss the concept of critique advanced in the "Kaizo" articles. (...)
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  10.  7
    Brian Harding and Michael R. Kelly: Early Phenomenology: Metaphysics, Ethics, and the Philosophy of Religion.Mark Fraser Novak - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 84 (1):149-152.
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  11.  24
    Bringing Philosophy Back to Life: Nietzsche and Heidegger's Early Phenomenology.Tracy Colony - 2014 - Studia Phaenomenologica 14:349-369.
    Most accounts of Heidegger’s relation to Nietzsche have traditionally focused on his famous Nietzsche lecture courses or upon his brief yet highly significant references to Nietzsche in Being and Time. However, with recent English translations of key lecture courses from Heidegger’s early Freiburg period it has become clear that during this time another distinct phase of Heidegger’s long and complex relation to Nietzsche can be identified. In this essay, I first chronicle Heidegger’s earliest references to Nietzsche in the period from (...)
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  12.  8
    Essential Laws: On Ideal Objects and Their Properties in Early Phenomenology.Guillaume Fréchette - 2015 - In Denis Seron, Sebastien Richard & Bruno Leclercq (eds.), Objects and Pseudo-Objects: Ontological Deserts and Jungles From Brentano to Carnap. De Gruyter. pp. 143-166.
    In the present paper, I try to shed some light on the Munich-Göttingen conception of essences, laws of essence, and ideal objects. I first start with a preliminary account of their conception of the synthetic a priori at the basis of their conception of essence (§2); I then offer a first characterization of this conception, which I label as metaphysical realism (§3), highlighting its key concept: foundation (§4). In the last four sections (§§5-8), I discuss different outcomes of this conception (...)
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  13.  5
    The Reception of Russell’s Paradox in Early Phenomenology and the School of Brentano: The Case of Husserl’s Manuscript A I 35α.Carlo Ierna - 2016 - In Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock (ed.), Husserl and Analytic Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 119-142.
  14.  15
    Early Phenomenology and the Origins of Analytic Philosophy.Gianfranco Soldati - 2002 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 2:93-115.
  15.  6
    Value Facts and Value Experiences in Early Phenomenology.Maria E. Reicher - 2009 - In B. Centi & W. Huemer (eds.), Value and Ontology. Ontos. pp. 12--105.
  16.  2
    The Project of Ethical Renewal and Critique: Edmund Husserl’s Early Phenomenology of Culture.Anthony J. Steinbock - 1994 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):449-464.
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  17. Introduction to The Early Phenomenology: Munich and Göttingen.Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray - 2012 - Quaestiones Disputatae 3 (1):4-6.
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  18. Medieval Studies, Historicity, and Heidegger's Early Phenomenology.Ethan Knapp - 2010 - In Andrew Cole & D. Vance Smith (eds.), The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages: On the Unwritten History of Theory. Duke University Press.
     
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  19. Sartre's Early Phenomenology of Authenticity 341.P. Mairet - 2003 - In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Phenomenology World-Wide. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 80--340.
     
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  20. Eugen Enyvvari’s Road to Göttingen and Back: A Case Study in the Transleithanian Participation in Early Phenomenology.Peter Andras Varga - 2017 - Studies in East European Thought 69 (1):57-78.
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  21. Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Acquiantance with Early Phenomenology.Alice von Hildebrand - 2012 - Quaestiones Disputatae 3 (1):7-19.
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  22.  19
    Brentano on Beauty and Aesthetics.Wolfgang Huemer - 2017 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Routledge Companion to Brentano and the Brentano School. London & New York: Routledge.
    In his entire oeuvre Brentano defended a scientific conception of philosophy and advocated the adoption of a rigorous, scientific method. Given this background it might come as a surprise that in his reflections on aesthetics he firmly rejected the classic definition of aesthetics as the science of beauty. This must not be read as an expression of disinterest in – or a dismissal of – aesthetics, though. It is rather an expression of Brentano's view concerning the position of aesthetics in (...)
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  23.  30
    Empathy, Emotional Sharing and Feelings in Stein’s Early Work.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):481-502.
    This paper is devoted to the study of the emotions in Edith Stein’s early work On the Problem of Empathy. After presenting her work embedded in the tradition of the early phenomenology of the emotions, I shall elaborate the four dimensions of the emotional experience according to this authoress, the link between emotions and values and the phenomenon of the living body. I argue that Stein’s account on empathy remains incomplete as long as we ignore the complex phenomenology of emotions (...)
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  24. Coping Without Foundations: On Dreyfus’s Use of Merleau‐Ponty.J. C. Berendzen - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (5):629-649.
    Hubert Dreyfus has recently invoked the work of Maurice Merleau? Ponty in criticizing the?Myth of the Mental?. In criticizing that supposed myth, Dreyfus argues for a kind of foundationalism that takes embodied coping to be a self?sufficient layer of human experience that supports our?higher? mental activities. In turn, Merleau? Ponty?s phenomenology is found, in Dreyfus?s recent writings, to corroborate this foundationalism. While Merleau? Ponty would agree with many of Dreyfus?s points, this paper argues that he would not, in fact, agree (...)
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  25.  48
    Nonidentity, Negative Experience and the Pre‐Reflective Cogito.Gillian Howie - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):589-607.
    This paper contributes to the current academic debate on the nature of embodied, intentional consciousness, specifically the attempt to inaugurate a rapprochement between phenomenological existentialism and critical theory. This is accomplished through a critical comparison of the concepts of negative experience and nonidentity in Theodor Adorno's negative dialectics and Jean-Paul Sartre's early phenomenology. By comparing how each engages with Hegel, I suggest that Sartre offers a broad, anthropological account of negative experience and nonidentity helpful to critical theorists but that there (...)
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  26.  35
    Searle, Derrida, and the Ends of Phenomenology.Kevin Mulligan - 2003 - In Barry Smith (ed.), John Searle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 261--86.
    The relations between Searle, Derrida, CP and phenomenology are complex. The writings of Derrida, the most influential figure within CP, are inseparably bound up with phenomenology and with the transformation of phenomenology effected by Heidegger. Indeed a large part of CP grew out of phenomenology. It has often been claimed that Searle's own contributions to the philosophy of mind advance claims already put forward by the phenomenologists, and Searle himself has given his own account of phenomenology, in particular of the (...)
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  27.  18
    Affectivity And Time: Towards A Phenomenology Of Embodied Time-Consciousness.Marek Pokropski - 2015 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 41 (1):161-172.
    In the article, I develop some ideas introduced by Edmund Husserl concerning time-consciousness and embodiment. However, I do not discuss the Husserlian account of consciousness of time in its full scope. I focus on the main ideas of the phenomenology of time and the problem of bodily sensations and their role in the constitution of consciousness of time. I argue that time-consciousness is primarily constituted in the dynamic experience of bodily feelings. In the first part, I outline the main ideas (...)
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  28.  55
    Adolf Reinach is Not a Platonist.Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray - 2009 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 13 (1):100-112.
    Contemporary scholars have generally labelled Adolf Reinach, a founding member of early phenomenology’s Göttingen Circle, a Platonist. Because Reinach conceives of states of affairs as neither real nor ideal, as involved with timeless essences and necessary logical laws, many have hastily concluded that states of affairs are Platonic entities. In this essay, I analyse Barry Smith’s argument that Reinach is a Platonist. Smith’s widely accepted argument often becomes utilised to show that Reinach and other phenomenologists, including Husserl, are Platonic realists (...)
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  29.  3
    When Poetry and Phenomenology Collide.Jeremy Page - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 5 (1):31-51.
    In recent years several scholars have wrestled with the term “poetic thought,” suggesting in various ways there is something distinctive about the nature of meaning as it occurs/unfolds through poetry. In this paper I suggest, in part following the lead of Simon Jarvis, that one of the most fruitful lines of inquiry for exploring this idea lies in a consideration of poetic works through the lens of Heidegger’s early phenomenology. Specifically, I argue that one of the keys to understanding poetic (...)
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  30.  8
    Phenomenology and Descriptive Psychology: Brentano, Stumpf, and Husserl.Denis Fisette - 2018 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the History of Phenomenology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 88-104.
    Entry on the influence of Stumpf et Brentano on Husserl's early phenomenology during the Halle period.
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  31.  59
    Feminist Standpoint Theory, Hegel and the Dialectical Self: Shifting the Foundations.Nadine Changfoot - 2004 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (4):477-502.
    The claim that theoretical foundations are historically contingent does not draw the same intensity of fire as it did one or especially two decades ago. The aftermath of debates on the political boundaries created by foundations allows for a deeper exploration of the foundations of feminist theory. This article re-examines the (anti)-Hegelian foundations of the feminist standpoint put forward by Nancy Hartsock and argues that the Hegelian subject of the early Phenomenology of Spirit resists gender codification in its experience of (...)
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  32.  1
    Phenomenology and Descriptive Psychology: Brentano, Stumpf, and Husserl.Denis Fisette - 2018 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the History of Phenomenology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 88-104.
    Entry on the influence of Stumpf et Brentano on Husserl's early phenomenology during the Halle period.
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  33.  12
    Ricoeur’s Askēsis: Textual and Gymnastic Exercises for Self-Transformation.Brian Gregor - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (3):421-438.
    This essay examines what the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur can contribute to current debates on the role of spiritual exercise, or askēsis, in philosophical life. The influential work of Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault has sparked a widespread interest in the ancient model of philosophy, variously described as a way of life, art of living, or care of the self. Ricoeur’s potential contribution to this conversation has been overlooked, largely because he does not discuss these themes explicitly or often. However, (...)
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  34.  33
    Cassirer and Husserl on the Phenomenology of Perception.Timothy Martell - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:413-431.
    This paper creates a dialogue between Ernst Cassirer, one of the last prominent representatives of Neo-Kantian thought, and Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology. In Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, Cassirer criticizes Husserl’s distinction between hylē and morphē. His criticism is based in part on the work of several figures belonging to the early phase of the phenomenological movement, including Wilhelm Schapp. By developing Cassirer’s criticism and considering the responses that Husserl could have offered, the dialogue helps to clarify the complex (...)
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  35.  48
    The Continuity Between Merleau-Ponty's Early and Late Philosophy of Language.Douglas Low - 1992 - Journal of Philosophical Research 17:287-311.
    The primary concem of this essay is the similarity and difference between Merleau-Ponty’s early (Phenomenology of Perception) and late (The Visible and the lnvisible) philosophy of language. While some argue that Merleau-Ponty’s late work breaks with the earlier text and foreshadows poststructuralist and deconstructionist philosophy of language, I argue (with others) that there is no significant break in Merleau-Ponty’s thought. The similarities discovered between the early and late philosophy of language are 1.) that the body opens onto a world that (...)
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  36.  6
    The Hubris of Transcendental Idealism.Martin Ritter - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):171-181.
    Jan Patočka’s early phenomenology, as presented in The Natural World as a Philosophical Problem, does not merely adopt Husserl’s concept of the lifeworld. The paper demonstrates the originality of Patočka’s appropriation of this concept, but also its internal tensions and difficulties. Seeking to elaborate a concept of a phenomenology allowing for a theory of the lifeworld stricto sensu, i.e. of the life of the world, Patočka’s book effectively shows that there is no ahistorical, absolute or “natural” starting point for phenomenology. (...)
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  37.  18
    Leopold Blaustein’s Critique of Husserl’s Early Theory of Intentional Act, Object and Content.Marek Pokropski - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:93-103.
    The aim of this article is to introduce the work of Leopold Blaustein — philosopher and psychologist, who studied under Kazimierz Twardowski in Lvov and under Husserl in Freiburg im Breisgau. In his short academic career Blaustein developed an original philosophy that drew upon both phenomenology and Twardowski’s analytical approach. One of his main publications concerns Husserl’s early theory of intentional act and object, introduced in Logische Untersuchungen. In the first part of the article I briefly present Blaustein’s biography and (...)
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  38.  10
    Affectivité Et Imaginaire Chez Merleau-Ponty: Nouvelles Lectures.Christopher Lapierre - 2016 - Studia Phaenomenologica 16:551-588.
    The objective of this paper is to show that the specific meaning of “affectivity” in Merleau-Ponty’s works can be better understood by approaching its connection with the notion of “imagination”. This strategy can be contrasted with Sartre’s approach; his specific conception of consciousness locks off the relation between imagination and affectivity from the start. On the contrary, the free play of this axis, which can be analysed since the early Phenomenology of Perception, allows for the overflowing of the horizon of (...)
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  39.  34
    Frühe Phänomenologie und die Ursprünge der analytischen Philosophie.Gianfranco Soldati - 2000 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 54 (3):313-340.
    It is by now common knowledge that analytic philosophy has its roots, at least partially, in phenomenology. It is less known that analytic philosophy has inherited part of its original antipsychologism precisely from phenomenology, or rather from early phenomenology. The present article traces the historical brackground of antipsychologism, starting with the debate on the philosophical foundations of psychology during the 19th century. It appears that naturalistic antipsychologism, the early phenomenologists position, has to be distinguished from transcendental antipsychologism, as it was (...)
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  40.  27
    Our Element: Flesh and Democracy in Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]Martín Plot - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):235-259.
    Although Merleau-Ponty’s early phenomenology of perception and his essays on art, politics, and language already showed an affinity between the aesthetic phenomena of expression and style and the political and cultural dynamics of society at large, this paper specifically focuses on his late theorizing of the notion of flesh and its relevance to his late understanding of politics and democracy. The emergence of flesh as a concept was contemporary to Merleau-Ponty’s break with Marxism as a philosophical model and with revolutionary (...)
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  41.  5
    Phenomenology Encounters Psychoanalysis.Zeynep Direk - 2016 - Chiasmi International 18:115-133.
    This essay argues that his encounter with the Lacanian claims about the imaginary and symbolic functions incited Merleau-Ponty to transform his early phenomenology. “The Mirror Stage Formative of the Function of the I as Revealed in Psychoanalytic Experience” forced Merleau-Ponty to reconsider the primacy of the notion of Leib in his early phenomenology. The modification of his phenomenological starting point culminates in the revision of his position on the relation of the imaginary and the symbolic functions to the real from (...)
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  42.  24
    Adolf Reinach on States of Affairs (Sachverhalt) and Negative Judgments.Raul Corazzon - unknown
    "Reinach's importance for the development of early phenomenology is particularly remarkable considering the brief life span of 34 years granted him for the development of his ideas and his influence. It was his death in action in 1917 rather than Husserl's going to Freiburg which cut short not only his own promise but that of the Gottingen phenomenological Circle. It is therefore not surprising that Reinach never found the time to formulate a comprehensive plan of a philosophy in which the (...)
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  43.  3
    Two Models of Conscience and the Liberty of Conscience in Hegel’s Practical Philosophy.Timothy L. Brownlee - 2017 - Symposium 21 (1):38-55.
    Hegel presents significant accounts of “conscience” at decisive moments both in the early Phenomenology of Spirit and the Philosophy of Right. In spite of some important similarities between these accounts, they present deeply different, perhaps even inconsistent, understandings of the nature and value of individual conscience. Roughly, on the Philosophy of Right account, conscience is fundamentally something inward and individualizing, requiring transformation if it is to be integrated into the social institutions and practices that constitute modern “ethical life.” By contrast, (...)
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  44.  5
    Phenomenological Film Theory and Max Scheler’s Personalist Aesthetics.Matthew Rukgaber - 2016 - Studia Phaenomenologica 16:215-240.
    Max Scheler never published a theory of art, but his aesthetics, like the rest of his thought, occupies an intriguing position that links early phenomenology, Catholic personalist thought, and philosophical anthropology. His metaphysics of the person and theory of value, when combined with his account of the lived-body and of our access to other minds through love, translates into a powerful, humanistic theory of art. This article elaborates what Scheler’s aesthetics would look like had he developed it and applied it (...)
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  45.  5
    Superación del representacionalismo e inmanentismo en la génesis de la fenomenología husserliana de la percepción.Rosemary Rizo-Patrón - 2005 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 17 (2):183-212.
    Husserl’s overcoming of the Modern representationalist and immanentist notions of consciousness and knowledge is tied to the early development of his sui generis concept of intentionality. This development is the result of logical and psychological studies, the latter laying open different modalities of intuition: the founded modes –eidetic and categorial– and the sensible founding modes, all of which presuppose the most basic and founding mode –that of perception . Although the Husserlian concept of intentionality is determined by Husserl’s discovery of (...)
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  46.  2
    Dark Light: The Mystical Theology of St. Edith Stein.Olli-Pekka Vainio - 2016 - Journal of Analytic Theology 4 (1):362-372.
    In this article, I will examine St. Edith Stein’s theory of religious language. Stein, who was both a professional philosopher and a mystic, and deeply rooted both in the tradition of negative theology and early phenomenology, held a peculiar version of univocity with regard to religious language. On the one hand, our concepts have something objectively in common with the thing they signify. On the other hand, our concepts are merely representations of the real. Therefore, when mystics say that God (...)
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  47.  1
    On the Trail of Whitehead. Lucas Jr - 2016 - Process Studies 45 (1):86-94.
    A young Canadian mathematician and philosopher, Winthrop Bell, who was Edmund Husserl's first doctoral student from North America, taught as a postdoc at Harvard in the 1920s, where he took a complete set of notes in the first class at Harvard taught by Alfred North Whitehead during the 1924-1925 academic year. These notes, missing for over 80 years, have recently been found. The notes transform scholarship concerning the early development of Whitehead's mature metaphysical views, while the note-taker's own career illuminates (...)
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  48. Hermann Weyl's Mathematics, Science and Phenomenology.Richard A. Feist - 1999 - Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)
    The work addresses the problem of the relationship between science and philosophy in the work of Hermann Weyl. The author begins by discussing Weylls Gottingen tradition. Contrary to standard accounts of this tradition, Edmund Husserl and Georg Cantor are included. The influence of this tradition on Weyl is then illustrated by an examination of Weyl's early philosophy of mathematics. Here Weyl attempts to use Husserl's early phenomenology to amalgamate the thought of Felix Klein, David Hilbert and Cantor. Weyl's "phenomenological period," (...)
     
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  49. Jose Ortega y Gasset's Anti-Idealistic Interpretation of Phenomenology.Brian Harding - 2016 - In Brian Harding & Michael R. Kelly (eds.), Early Phenomenology: Metaphysics, Ethics and the Philosophy of Religion. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 107-124.
    In this paper, relying mainly on his "Preface for Germans" I describe Ortega's complaints about Husserl's transcendental reduction, his own "anti-idealistic" approach to phenomenology, and his alternative version of the reduction, a reduction to life. Similarities with the work of Michel Henry are noted, but not explored in detail. Mention is made of Graham Harmon's interpretation of Ortega in "Guerrilla Metaphysics," but only to set up my interpretation of Ortega.
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  50.  8
    Proto-Phenomenology and the Nature of Language: Dwelling in Speech I.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2017 - London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    How is it that sounds from the mouth or marks on a page—which by themselves are nothing like things or events in the world—can be world-disclosive in an automatic manner? In this fascinating and important book, Lawrence J. Hatab presents a new vocabulary for Heidegger’s early phenomenology of being-in-the-world and applies it to the question of language. He takes language to be a mode of dwelling, in which there is an immediate, direct disclosure of meanings, and sketches an extensive picture (...)
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