Results for '*Facial Expressions'

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  1.  21
    Caricaturing Facial Expressions.Andrew J. Calder, Duncan Rowland, Andrew W. Young, Ian Nimmo-Smith, Jill Keane & David I. Perrett - 2000 - Cognition 76 (2):105-146.
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  2. Facial Expressions.Paul Ekman - 1999 - In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley. pp. 16--301.
  3.  12
    Processing Facial Expressions of Emotion: Upright Vs. Inverted Images.David L. Bimler, Slawomir J. Skwarek & Galina V. Paramei - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  4. Facial Expression Megamix: Tests of Dimensional And.Nancy L. Etcoff, Anil Seth & David I. Perrettb - 1997 - Cognition 63:271-313.
     
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  5.  36
    Multidimensional Scaling of Facial Expressions.Robert P. Abelson & Vello Sermat - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (6):546.
  6.  39
    Facial Expressions of Emotion: Are Angry Faces Detected More Efficiently?Elaine Fox, Victoria Lester, Riccardo Russo, R. J. Bowles, Alessio Pichler & Kevin Dutton - 2000 - Cognition and Emotion 14 (1):61-92.
  7.  35
    Facial Expression of Pain: An Evolutionary Account.Amanda C. De C. Williams - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):439-455.
    This paper proposes that human expression of pain in the presence or absence of caregivers, and the detection of pain by observers, arises from evolved propensities. The function of pain is to demand attention and prioritise escape, recovery, and healing; where others can help achieve these goals, effective communication of pain is required. Evidence is reviewed of a distinct and specific facial expression of pain from infancy to old age, consistent across stimuli, and recognizable as pain by observers. Voluntary control (...)
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  8.  34
    Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy.Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to be more complex. Some facial expressions may (...)
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  9.  12
    Facial Expressions of Basic Emotions in Japanese Laypeople.Wataru Sato, Sylwia Hyniewska, Kazusa Minemoto & Sakiko Yoshikawa - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  10.  32
    Facial Expression in Nonhuman Animals.Bridget M. Waller & Jérôme Micheletta - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):54-59.
    Many nonhuman animals produce facial expressions which sometimes bear clear resemblance to the facial expressions seen in humans. An understanding of this evolutionary continuity between species, and how this relates to social and ecological variables, can help elucidate the meaning, function, and evolution of facial expression. This aim, however, requires researchers to overcome the theoretical and methodological differences in how human and nonhuman facial expressions are approached. Here, we review the literature relating to nonhuman facial expressions (...)
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  11.  6
    Facial Expression Related vMMN: Disentangling Emotional From Neutral Change Detection.Klara Kovarski, Marianne Latinus, Judith Charpentier, Helen Cléry, Sylvie Roux, Emmanuelle Houy-Durand, Agathe Saby, Frédérique Bonnet-Brilhault, Magali Batty & Marie Gomot - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  12.  20
    Facial Expression Megamix: Tests of Dimensional and Category Accounts of Emotion Recognition.Andrew W. Young, Duncan Rowland, Andrew J. Calder, Nancy L. Etcoff, Anil Seth & David I. Perrett - 1997 - Cognition 63 (3):271-313.
  13.  45
    Coherence Between Emotion and Facial Expression: Evidence From Laboratory Experiments.Rainer Reisenzein, Markus Studtmann & Gernot Horstmann - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):16-23.
    Evidence on the coherence between emotion and facial expression in adults from laboratory experiments is reviewed. High coherence has been found in several studies between amusement and smiling; low to moderate coherence between other positive emotions and smiling. The available evidence for surprise and disgust suggests that these emotions are accompanied by their “traditional” facial expressions, and even components of these expressions, only in a minority of cases. Evidence concerning sadness, anger, and fear is very limited. For sadness, (...)
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  14.  13
    Dynamic Facial Expression of Emotion and Observer Inference.Klaus R. Scherer, Heiner Ellgring, Anja Dieckmann, Matthias Unfried & Marcello Mortillaro - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  15.  31
    Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Evidence From Multidimensional Scaling.David Bimler & John Kirkland - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):633-658.
  16.  15
    From Facial Expressions to Bodily Gestures: Passions, Photography and Movement in French 19th-Century Sciences.Beatriz Pichel - 2016 - History of the Human Sciences 29 (1):27-48.
    This article aims to determine to what extent photographic practices in psychology, psychiatry and physiology contributed to the definition of the external bodily signs of passions and emotions in the second half of the 19th century in France. Bridging the gap between recent research in the history of emotions and photographic history, the following analyses focus on the photographic production of scientists and photographers who made significant contributions to the study of expressions and gestures, namely Duchenne de Boulogne, Charles (...)
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  17.  16
    Inherently Ambiguous: Facial Expressions of Emotions, in Context.Ran R. Hassin, Hillel Aviezer & Shlomo Bentin - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):60-65.
    With a few yet increasing number of exceptions, the cognitive sciences enthusiastically endorsed the idea that there are basic facial expressions of emotions that are created by specific configurations of facial muscles. We review evidence that suggests an inherent role for context in emotion perception. Context does not merely change emotion perception at the edges; it leads to radical categorical changes. The reviewed findings suggest that configurations of facial muscles are inherently ambiguous, and they call for a different approach (...)
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  18.  16
    Facial Expressions Allow Inference of Both Emotions and Their Components.Klaus R. Scherer & Didier Grandjean - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (5):789-801.
  19.  35
    Dynamic Facial Expressions Prime the Processing of Emotional Prosody.Patricia Garrido-Vásquez, Marc D. Pell, Silke Paulmann & Sonja A. Kotz - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  20.  1
    Facial Expression Recognition Using Kernel Entropy Component Analysis Network and DAGSVM.Xiangmin Chen, Li Ke, Qiang Du, Jinghui Li & Xiaodi Ding - 2021 - Complexity 2021:1-12.
    Facial expression recognition plays a significant part in artificial intelligence and computer vision. However, most of facial expression recognition methods have not obtained satisfactory results based on low-level features. The existed methods used in facial expression recognition encountered the major issues of linear inseparability, large computational burden, and data redundancy. To obtain satisfactory results, we propose an innovative deep learning model using the kernel entropy component analysis network and directed acyclic graph support vector machine. We use the KECANet in the (...)
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  21.  65
    The Description of Facial Expressions in Terms of Two Dimensions.Harold Schlosberg - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):229.
  22.  48
    Children’s Interpretation of Facial Expressions: The Long Path From Valence-Based to Specific Discrete Categories.Sherri C. Widen - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):72-77.
    According to a common sense theory, facial expressions signal specific emotions to people of all ages and therefore provide children easy access to the emotions of those around them. The evidence, however, does not support that account. Instead, children’s understanding of facial expressions is poor and changes qualitatively and slowly over the course of development. Initially, children divide facial expressions into two simple categories (feels good, feels bad). These broad categories are then gradually differentiated until an adult (...)
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  23. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations: Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research.K. L. Schmidt & J. F. Cohn - 2001 - American Journal of Physical Anthropology:3-24.
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  24.  16
    Emotional Facial Expressions Differentially Influence Predictions and Performance for Face Recognition.Jason S. Nomi, Matthew G. Rhodes & Anne M. Cleary - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (1):141-149.
  25.  24
    Angry Facial Expressions Bias Gender Categorization in Children and Adults: Behavioral and Computational Evidence.Laurie Bayet, Olivier Pascalis, Paul C. Quinn, Kang Lee, ÉDouard Gentaz & James W. Tanaka - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  26.  19
    Facial Expressions, Smile Types, and Self-Report During Humour, Tickle, and Pain.Christine Harris & Nancy Alvarado - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):655-669.
  27.  13
    Emotional Facial Expressions and the Attentional Blink: Attenuated Blink for Angry and Happy Faces Irrespective of Social Anxiety.Peter J. de Jong, Ernst Hw Koster, Rineke van Wees & Sander Martens - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (8):1640-1652.
  28.  15
    Facial Expressions as Performances in Mime.Mahsa Ershadi, Thalia R. Goldstein, Joseph Pochedly & James A. Russell - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (3):494-503.
    That facial expressions are universal emotion signals has been supported by observers agreeing on the emotion mimed by actors. We show that actors can mime a diverse range of states: emotions, cognitions, physical states, and actions. English, Hindi, and Malayalam speakers viewed 25 video clips and indicated the state conveyed. Within each language, at least 23 of the 25 clips were recognised above chance and base rate. Facial expressions of emotions are not special in their recognisability, and it (...)
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  29.  7
    Automated Facial Expression Measurement : Recent Applications to Basic Research in Human Behavior, Learning, and Education.Marian Stewart Bartlett & Jacob Whitehill - 2011 - In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Automatic facial expression recognition has now advanced to the point that we are able to apply it to spontaneous expressions. The automated tools enable new research activity in cognitive neuroscience, psychiatry, education, human–machine communication, and human social dynamics. Moreover, automated facial expression analysis enables investigations into facial expression dynamics that were previously intractable by human coding because of the time required to code intensity changes. This article provides an overview on the state of the art in computer vision approaches (...)
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  30.  62
    Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness.John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.
    A substantial body of research has established that even when we are not consciously aware of the faces of others we are nevertheless sensitive to, and impacted by their facial expression. In this paper, we consider this body of research from a new perspective by examining the functions of unconscious perception revealed by these studies. A consideration of the literature from this perspective highlights that existing research methods are limited when it comes to revealing possible functions of unconscious perception. The (...)
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  31.  29
    Facial Expression of Pain – More Than a Fuzzy Expression of Distress?Christiane Hermann & Herta Flor - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):462-463.
    Facial expressions of pain may be best conceptualized as an example of an evolved propensity to communicate distress, rather than as a distinct category of facial expression. The operant model goes beyond the evolutionary account, as it can explain how the (facial) expression of pain can become maladaptive as a result of its capability to elicit attention and caring behavior in the observer.
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  32.  16
    Spontaneous Facial Expressions of Happy Bowlers and Soccer Fans.María-Angeles Ruiz-Belda, José-Miguel Fernández-Dols, Pilar Carrera & Kim Barchard - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):315-326.
  33.  16
    Children Facial Expression Production: Influence of Age, Gender, Emotion Subtype, Elicitation Condition and Culture.Charline Grossard, Laurence Chaby, Stéphanie Hun, Hugues Pellerin, Jérémy Bourgeois, Arnaud Dapogny, Huaxiong Ding, Sylvie Serret, Pierre Foulon, Mohamed Chetouani, Liming Chen, Kevin Bailly, Ouriel Grynszpan & David Cohen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  34. Spontaneous Facial Expressions and Micro-Expressions Coding: From Brain to Face.Zizhao Dong, Gang Wang, Shaoyuan Lu, Jingting Li, Wenjing Yan & Su-Jing Wang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Facial expressions are a vital way for humans to show their perceived emotions. It is convenient for detecting and recognizing expressions or micro-expressions by annotating a lot of data in deep learning. However, the study of video-based expressions or micro-expressions requires that coders have professional knowledge and be familiar with action unit coding, leading to considerable difficulties. This paper aims to alleviate this situation. We deconstruct facial muscle movements from the motor cortex and systematically sort (...)
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  35.  23
    On Perceiving Facial Expressions: The Role of Culture and Context.Nalini Ambady & Max Weisbuch - 2011 - In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oxford University Press. pp. 479--488.
    Facial expressions have communicative properties that bear some importance to perceivers. Such expressions are informative with respect to the future behavior of the expressing individual and with respect to the conditions of the broader social environment. This article argues that appropriate responses to facial expressions are an important means by which people adapt to their social ecology. The immediate responses to facial expressions depend on contextual factors. It is more important for individuals to adapt to the (...)
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  36.  49
    Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions.Nancy L. Etcoff & John J. Magee - 1992 - Cognition 44 (3):227-240.
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  37.  95
    Culture and Facial Expression: Open-Ended Methods Find More Expressions and a Gradient of Recognition.Jonathan Haidt & Dacher Keltner - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (3):225-266.
  38.  41
    Forming Facial Expressions Influences Assessment of Others' Dominance but Not Trustworthiness.Yoshiyuki Ueda, Kie Nagoya, Sakiko Yoshikawa & Michio Nomura - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  39.  7
    Dynamic Facial Expressions Are Processed Holistically, but Not More Holistically Than Static Facial Expressions.Alanna Tobin, Simone Favelle & Romina Palermo - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (6).
  40.  4
    Facial Expressions During an Extremely Intense Emotional Situation: Toreros’ Lip Funnel.José-Antonio García-Higuera, Carlos Crivelli & José-Miguel Fernández-Dols - 2015 - Social Science Information 54 (4):439-454.
    Since Darwin, emotions have been defined as adaptive reactions that increase the probability of survival. In this framework, a situation in which individuals fight for their life with an imposing, aggressive animal should be an ideal elicitor of emotions and their corresponding facial expressions. We tested the correspondence between the facial expressions of 22 bullfighters and their reported emotions at different stages of the fight. Toreros reported intense experiences of happiness or fear, but there were no observable instances (...)
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  41.  14
    How Facial Expressions of Emotion Affect Distance Perception.Nam-Gyoon Kim & Heejung Son - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  42.  91
    The Simulation of Smiles (SIMS) Model: Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression.Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):417.
    Recent application of theories of embodied or grounded cognition to the recognition and interpretation of facial expression of emotion has led to an explosion of research in psychology and the neurosciences. However, despite the accelerating number of reported findings, it remains unclear how the many component processes of emotion and their neural mechanisms actually support embodied simulation. Equally unclear is what triggers the use of embodied simulation versus perceptual or conceptual strategies in determining meaning. The present article integrates behavioral research (...)
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  43.  26
    Does Facial Identity and Facial Expression Recognition Involve Separate Visual Routes?Andy Calder - 2011 - In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oxford University Press.
    This article discusses how research on the image-based analysis of facial images has informed this debate by demonstrating that a single representational system for facial identity and facial expression is not only computationally viable, but can simulate existing cognitive data demonstrating apparent dissociable processing of these two facial properties. It discusses the increasing number of cognitive studies that provide support for this view. Neuropsychological case studies of brain-injured patients and provide limited evidence for separate visual routes processing facial identity and (...)
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  44.  27
    Warsaw Set of Emotional Facial Expression Pictures: A Validation Study of Facial Display Photographs.Michal Olszanowski, Grzegorz Pochwatko, Krzysztof Kuklinski, Michal Scibor-Rylski, Peter Lewinski & Rafal K. Ohme - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  45.  74
    Facial Expression of Pain, Empathy, Evolution, and Social Learning.Amanda C. De C. Williams - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):475-480.
    The experience of pain appears to be associated, from early infancy and across pain stimuli, with a consistent facial expression in humans. A social function is proposed for this: the communication of pain and the need for help to observers, to whom information about danger is of value, and who may provide help within a kin or cooperative relationship. Some commentators have asserted that the evidence is insufficient to account for the consistency of the face, as judged by technical means (...)
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  46.  18
    Attentional Bias for Threatening Facial Expressions in Anxiety: Manipulation of Stimulus Duration.Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg, Sara J. Falla & Lucy R. Hamilton - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (6):737-753.
  47.  46
    Automatic Facial Expression Interpretation: Where Human Computer Interaction, Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science Intersect.Christine L. Lisetti & Diane J. Schiano - 2000 - Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):185-236.
    We discuss here one of our projects, aimed at developing an automatic facial expression interpreter, mainly in terms of signaled emotions. We present some of the relevant findings on facial expressions from cognitive science and psychology that can be understood by and be useful to researchers in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence. We then give an overview of HCI applications involving automated facial expression recognition, we survey some of the latest progresses in this area reached by various approaches in (...)
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  48.  18
    About Face! Infant Facial Expression of Emotion.Pamela M. Cole & Ginger A. Moore - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):116-120.
    In honoring Carroll Izard’s contributions to emotion research, we discuss infant facial activity and emotion expression. We consider the debated issue of whether infants are biologically prepared to express specific emotions. We offer a perspective that potentially integrates differing viewpoints on infant facial expression of emotion. Specifically, we suggest that evolution has prepared infants with innate action readiness patterns, which are crucial for early infant–caregiver social interaction, and in the course of social interaction specific facial configurations acquire functional significance, becoming (...)
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  49.  54
    Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions.Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy with which to (...)
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  50.  16
    Facial Expressions in Context: Electrophysiological Correlates of the Emotional Congruency of Facial Expressions and Background Scenes.Qiang Xu, Yaping Yang, Qun Tan & Lin Zhang - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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