Results for '*Illusions (Perception)'

215 found
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  1. Emotions, Perceptions, and Emotional Illusions.Christine Tappolet - 2012 - In Calabi Clotilde (ed.), Perceptual Illusions. Philosophical and Psychological Essays, Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 207-24.
    Emotions often misfire. We sometimes fear innocuous things, such as spiders or mice, and we do so even if we firmly believe that they are innocuous. This is true of all of us, and not only of phobics, who can be considered to suffer from extreme manifestations of a common tendency. We also feel too little or even sometimes no fear at all with respect to very fearsome things, and we do so even if we believe that they are fearsome. (...)
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  2.  20
    Visual Illusions Help Reveal the Primitives of Number Perception.Edwina Picon, Denitza Dramkin & Darko Odic - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (10):1675-1687.
  3. The Illusions of Time: Philosophical and Psychological Essays on Timing and Time Perception.Adrian Bardon, V. Artsila, Sean Enda Power & A. Vatakis (eds.) - 2019 - Palgrave McMillan.
    This edited collection presents the latest cutting-edge research in the philosophy and cognitive science of temporal illusions. Illusion and error have long been important points of entry for both philosophical and psychological approaches to understanding the mind. Temporal illusions, specifically, concern a fundamental feature of lived experience, temporality, and its relation to a fundamental feature of the world, time, thus providing invaluable insight into investigations of the mind and its relationship with the world. The existence of temporal illusions crucially challenges (...)
     
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  4.  3
    The Illusions of Time: Philosophical and Psychological Essays on Timing and Time Perception.Adrian Bardon, Valtteri Arstila, Sean Power & Argiro Vatakis (eds.) - 2019 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    This edited collection presents the latest cutting-edge research in the philosophy and cognitive science of temporal illusions. Illusion and error have long been important points of entry for both philosophical and psychological approaches to understanding the mind. Temporal illusions, specifically, concern a fundamental feature of lived experience, temporality, and its relation to a fundamental feature of the world, time, thus providing invaluable insight into investigations of the mind and its relationship with the world. The existence of temporal illusions crucially challenges (...)
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  5. Hallucinations and Illusions: A Study of the Fallacies of Perception.Edmund Parish - 1898 - Mind 7 (28):541-547.
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  6.  25
    Attitudes and illusions: Herbert Leyendecker’s phenomenology of perception.Kristjan Laasik - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (3):279-298.
    In this paper, I discuss aspects of Herbert Leyendecker’s 1913 doctoral dissertation, Towards the Phenomenology of Deceptions, which he defended in 1913 at the University of Munich. Leyendecker was a member of the Munich and Göttingen Phenomenological Circles. In my discussion of his largely neglected views, I explore the connection between his ideas concerning “attitudes”, e.g., of searching for, observing, counting, or working with objects, and the central topic of his text, perceptual illusions, thematized by Leyendecker as a kind of (...)
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  7. Seeing What You Hear: Cross-Modal Illusions and Perception.Casey O'Callaghan - 2008 - Philosophical Issues 18 (1):316-338.
    Cross-modal perceptual illusions occur when a stimulus to one modality impacts perceptual experience associated with another modality. Unlike synaesthesia, cross-modal illusions are intelligible as results of perceptual strategies for dealing with sensory stimulation to multiple modalities, rather than as mere quirks. I argue that understanding cross-modal illusions reveals an important flaw in a widespread conception of the senses, and of their role in perceptual experience, according to which understanding perception and perceptual experience is a matter of assembling independently viable (...)
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  8. Believing in Perceiving: Known Illusions and the Classical Dual‐Component Theory.Jake Quilty-Dunn - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (4):550-575.
    According to a classic but nowadays discarded philosophical theory, perceptual experience is a complex of nonconceptual sensory states and full-blown propositional beliefs. This classical dual-component theory of experience is often taken to be obsolete. In particular, there seem to be cases in which perceptual experience and belief conflict: cases of known illusions, wherein subjects have beliefs contrary to the contents of their experiences. Modern dual-component theories reject the belief requirement and instead hold that perceptual experience is a complex of nonconceptual (...)
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  9.  17
    Hallucinations and Illusions: A Study of the Fallacies of Perception.W. B. Pillsbury - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7 (2):219-220.
  10.  11
    Illusions of Integration Are Subjectively Impenetrable: Phenomenological Experience of Lag 1 Percepts During Dual-Target RSVP.Luca Simione, Elkan G. Akyürek, Valentina Vastola, Antonino Raffone & Howard Bowman - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 51:181-192.
  11.  19
    A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception.Casey O'Callaghan - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Nearly every theory of perception just focuses on one sense at a time; but most of the time we perceive using multiple senses. Casey O'Callaghan offers a revisionist multisensory philosophy of perception: he explores how our senses work together and influence each other, leading to surprising perceptual illusions and novel forms of experience.
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  12. Internal Models and the Construction of Time: Generalizing From State Estimation to Trajectory Estimation to Address Temporal Features of Perception, Including Temporal Illusions.Rick Grush - unknown
    The question of whether time is its own best representation is explored. Though there is theoretical debate between proponents of internal models and embedded cognition proponents (e.g. Brooks R 1991 Artificial Intelligence 47 139–59) concerning whether the world is its own best model, proponents of internal models are often content to let time be its own best representation. This happens via the time update of the model that simply allows the model’s state to evolve along with the state of the (...)
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  13.  32
    Over My Fake Body: Body Ownership Illusions for Studying the Multisensory Basis of Own-Body Perception.Konstantina Kilteni, Antonella Maselli, Konrad P. Kording & Mel Slater - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  14.  3
    Understanding Human Perception by Human-Made Illusions.Claus-Christian Carbon - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  15. The Openness of Illusions.Louise Antony - 2011 - Philosophical Issues 21 (1):25-44.
    Illusions are thought to make trouble for the intuition that perceptual experience is "open" to the world. Some have suggested, in response to the this trouble, that illusions differ from veridical experience in the degree to which their character is determined by their engagement with the world. An understanding of the psychology of perception reveals that this is not the case: veridical and falsidical perceptions engage the world in the same way and to the same extent. While some contemporary (...)
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  16.  3
    Hallucinations and Illusions: A Study of the Fallacies of Perception. E. Parish - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7:219.
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  17.  46
    Perception.Adam Pautz - 2021 - Routledge.
    Perception is one of the most pervasive and puzzling problems in philosophy, generating a great deal of attention and controversy in philosophy of mind, psychology and metaphysics. If perceptual illusion and hallucination are possible, how can perception be what it intuitively seems to be, a direct and immediate access to reality? How can perception be both internally dependent and externally directed? Perception is an outstanding introduction to this fundamental topic, covering both the perennial and recent work (...)
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  18.  22
    Commentary: What Visual Illusions Tell Us About Underlying Neural Mechanisms and Observer Strategies for Tackling the Inverse Problem of Achromatic Perception.Alan Gilchrist - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  19.  3
    What Visual Illusions Tell Us About Underlying Neural Mechanisms and Observer Strategies for Tackling the Inverse Problem of Achromatic Perception.Barbara Blakeslee & Mark E. McCourt - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  20. Idealism and Illusions.Robert Smithson - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):137-151.
    According to the idealist, facts about phenomenal experience determine facts about the physical world. Any such view must account for illusions: cases where there is a discrepancy between the physical world and our experiences of it. In this paper, I critique some recent idealist treatments of illusions before presenting my own preferred account. I then argue that, initial impressions notwithstanding, it is actually the realist who has difficulties properly accounting for illusions.
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  21. Illusions of Optimal Motion, Relationism, and Perceptual Content.Santiago Echeverri - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (S1):146-173.
    Austere relationism rejects the orthodox analysis of hallucinations and illusions as incorrect perceptual representations. In this article, I argue that illusions of optimal motion present a serious challenge for this view. First, I submit that austere-relationist accounts of misleading experiences cannot be adapted to account for IOMs. Second, I show that any attempt at elucidating IOMs within an austere-relationist framework undermines the claim that perceptual experiences fundamentally involve relations to mind-independent objects. Third, I develop a representationalist model of IOMs. The (...)
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  22.  23
    Olfactory Illusions: Where Are They?Richard J. Stevenson - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1887-1898.
    It has been suggested that there maybe no olfactory illusions. This manuscript examines this claim and argues that it arises because olfactory illusions are not typically accompanied by an awareness of their illusory nature. To demonstrate that olfactory illusions do occur, the relevant empirical literature is reviewed, by examining instances of where the same stimulus results in different percepts, and of where different stimuli result in the same percept. The final part of the manuscript evaluates the evidence favoring the existence (...)
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  23.  17
    Temporal Illusions -- Philosophical Considerations.Sean Enda Power - 2011 - In A. Vatakis, A. Esposito, M. Giagkou, F. Cummins & G. Papadelis (eds.), Multidisciplinary Aspects of Time and Time Perception. Springer. pp. 11-35.
    Does the status of certain temporal experiences as illusory depend on one’s conception of time? Our concept of time in part determines our concept of what we hold to be real and unreal; what we hold to be real and unreal partially determines what we hold to be illusory; thus, our concept of time in part determines what we hold to be illusory. This paper argues that this dependency of illusions on the concept of time is applicable to illusions of (...)
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  24. Affording Illusions? Natural Information and the Problem of Misperception.Hajo Greif - 2019 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 10 (3):1-21.
    There are two related points at which J.J. Gibson’s ecological theory of visual perception remains remarkably underspecified: Firstly, the notion of information for perception is not explicated in much detail beyond the claim that it “specifies” the environment for perception, and, thus being an objective affair, enables an organism to perceive action possibilities or “affordances.” Secondly, misperceptions of affordances and perceptual illusions are not clearly distinguished from each other. Although the first claim seems to suggest that any (...)
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  25. Illusions and Perceptual Norms as Spandrels of the Temporality of Living.David Morris - 2015 - In Maxime Doyon & Thiemo Breyer (eds.), Normativity in Perception. pp. 75-90.
    This chapter challenges the view that perceptual illusions are mistakes, by first of all emphasizing how the concept of illusions-as-mistakes relies on perspectives unavailable within illusory experiences and introduces norms fixed outside such experiences. A study of ‘rubber hand illusions’ suggests how illusions are not mistaken perceptions, but cases in which perceived objects makes a different kind of sense—in virtue of a norm that is not a fixed, objective standard but is ongoingly engendered within the dynamics of living, perceptual behaviour. (...)
     
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  26.  2
    The Nature of Illusions: A New Synthesis Based on Verifiability.Christopher W. Tyler - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    This overview discusses the nature of perceptual illusions with particular reference to the theory that illusions represent the operation of a sensory code for which there is no meaningful ground truth against which the illusory percepts can be compared, and therefore there are no illusions as such. This view corresponds to the Bayesian theory that “illusions” reflect unusual aspects of the core strategies of adapting to the natural world, again implying that illusions are simply an information processing characteristic. Instead, it (...)
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  27.  23
    The Grand Illusion and Petit Illusions: Interactions of Perception and Sensory Coding.Bruce Bridgeman - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):29-34.
    The Grand Illusion, the experience of a rich phenomenal visual world supported by a poor internal representation of that world, is echoed by petit illusions of the same sort. We can be aware of several aspects of an object or pattern, even when they are inconsistent with one another, because different neurological mechanisms code the various aspects separately. They are bound not by an internal linkage, but by the structure of the world itself. Illusions exploit this principle by introducing inconsistencies (...)
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  28. Synesthesia Vs. Crossmodal Illusions.Casey O'Callaghan - 2017 - In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New Essays on Synaesthesia. Oxford, UK: pp. 45-58.
    We can discern two opposing viewpoints regarding synesthesia. According to the first, it is an oddity, an outlier, or a disordered condition. According to the second, synesthesia is pervasive, driving creativity, metaphor, or language itself. Which is it? Ultimately, I favor the first perspective, according to which cross-sensory synesthesia is an outlying condition. But the second perspective is not wholly misguided. My discussion has three lessons. First, synesthesia is just one of a variety of effects in which one sense modality (...)
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  29.  97
    Intuitions and Illusions: From Explanation and Experiment to Assessment.Eugen Fischer, Paul E. Engelhardt & Aurelie Herbelot - 2015 - In Eugen Fischer & John Collins (eds.), Experimental Philosophy, Rationalism, and Naturalism. Rethinking Philosophical Method. Routledge. pp. 259-292.
    This paper pioneers the use of methods and findings from psycholinguistics in experimental philosophy’s ‘sources project’. On this basis, it clarifies the epistemological relevance of empirical findings about intuitions – a key methodological challenge to experimental philosophy. The sources project (aka ‘cognitive epistemology of intuitions’) seeks to develop psychological explanations of philosophically relevant intuitions, which help us assess their evidentiary value. One approach seeks explanations which trace relevant intuitions back to automatic cognitive processes that are generally reliable but predictably generate (...)
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  30.  25
    A Phenomenological Analysis of the Perception of Geometric Illusions.Paul Richer - 1977 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 8 (2):123-135.
  31.  33
    The Importance of Orienting Attitudes in the Perception of the Hering and Zollner Illusions.Rebecca L. Silberman & Douglas A. Bors - 1993 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 24 (2):161-174.
    By analyzing descriptions of illusory and nonillusory figures, Richer called into question the common assumption that illusory and nonillusory perceptions were experientially the same and differed only in terms of their accuracy. The present study attempted to replicate Richer's work with a focus on identifying within the subjects' descriptions any orienting attitudes corresponding to these two forms of perception. Nineteen student volunteers were asked to describe two illusory figures and a nonillusory control of similar complexity. The descriptions revealed consistent (...)
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  32.  21
    Against Illusions of Duration.Sean Enda Power - 2019 - In Adrian Bardon, Valtteri Arstila, Sean Power & Argiro Vatakis (eds.), The Illusions of Time: Philosophical and Psychological Essays on Timing and Time Perception. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Are there illusions of duration? Certainly, many experiences of an event’s duration differ from its measure in clock duration, the measure of that event in seconds, minutes, hours, and so forth. However, I argue that an illusory duration requires more than difference from a real duration; it requires difference from a duration that is relevant to experience. It is plausible to hold that there are many kinds of real duration and reason to question the relevance of all of them. In (...)
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  33.  66
    Illusions of Corporate Power:Revisiting the Relative Powers of Corporations and Governments.Jan Tullberg - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):325-333.
    A common opinion is that power has shifted from states to companies. This article discusses quantitative and qualitative aspects of power possessed by companies and by states. A more adequate comparison than that between company sales and gross national product is the one between company value added and GNP. Also more adequate is the comparison between the public sector and company net profit. These rival measures take down company power to about a tenth of the sales measure. Also in qualitative (...)
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  34.  8
    The Differential Use of Monocular and Binocular Cues to Depth in the Perception of Two Trapezoid Illusions.Robert Zenhausern, Frank Duffy & Leslee Nickel - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (2):88-90.
  35. Mirrors, Illusions and Epistemic Innocence.Roberto Casati - unknown
    I examine some accounts that articulate the content of perception that occurs by means of a mirror. The defended account entails that a right hand seen in the mirror does not "become" a left hand.
     
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  36.  30
    Dissociating Size Representation for Action and for Conscious Judgment: Grasping Visual Illusions Without Apparent Obstacles.Elisabeth Stöttinger & Josef Perner - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):269-284.
    Visual illusions provide important evidence for the co-existence of unconscious and conscious representations. Objects surrounded by other figures are consciously perceived as different in size, while the visuo-motor system supposedly uses an unconscious representation of the discs’ true size for grip size scaling. Recent evidence suggests other factors than represented size, e.g., surrounding rings conceived as obstacles, affect grip size. Use of the diagonal illusion avoids visual obstacles in the path of the reaching hand. Results support the dual representation theory. (...)
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  37.  10
    Practice and its Effects on the Perception of Illusions.Charles H. Judd - 1902 - Psychological Review 9 (1):27-39.
  38. The Crooked Oar, The Moon’s Size and The Necker Cube. Essays on the Illusions of Outer and Inner Perception.C. Calabi & K. Mulligan (eds.) - forthcoming
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  39. *Perception* (2021, Preview).Adam Pautz - 2021 - In Perception.
    A preview of my book *Perception*. Discusses the relationship between perception and the physical world and the issue of whether reality is as it appears. Useful examples are included throughout the book to illustrate the puzzles of perception, including hallucinations, illusions, the laws of appearance, blindsight, and neuroscientific explanations of our experience of pain, smell and color. The book covers both traditional philosophical arguments and more recent empirical arguments deriving from research in psychophysics and neuroscience. The addition (...)
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  40.  65
    Dissipating Illusions.Eldon C. Wait - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (2):221-242.
    Perhaps the greatest challenge to an existential phenomenological account of perception is that posed by the argument from illusions. Recent developments in research on the behaviour of subjects suffering from illusions together with some seminal ideas found in Merleau-Ponty''s writings enable us to develop and corroborate an account of the phenomenon of illusions, one, which unlike the empiricist account, does not undermine our conviction that in perception we reach the things themselves. The traditional argument from illusions derives its (...)
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  41.  3
    Perceptual Illusions: Philosophical and Psychological Essays.Clotilde Calabi (ed.) - 2012 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    Although current debates in epistemology and philosophy of mind show a renewed interest in perceptual illusions, there is no systematic work in the philosophy of perception and in the psychology of perception with respect to the concept of illusion and the relation between illusion and error. This book aims to fill that gap.
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  42. Perception and Objective Being: Peter Auriol on Perceptual Acts and Their Objects.Lukáš Lička - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):49-76.
    This article discusses the theory of perception of Peter Auriol. Arguing for the active nature of the senses in perception, Auriol applies the Scotistic doctrine of objective being to the theory of perception. Nevertheless, he still accepts some parts of the theory of species. The paper introduces Auriol's view on the mechanism of perception and his account of illusions. I argue for a direct realist reading of Auriol's theory of perception and propose that his position (...)
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  43.  1
    The Two-Wrongs Model Explains Perception-Action Dissociations for Illusions Driven by Distortions of the Egocentric Reference Frame.Paul Dassonville & Scott A. Reed - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  44.  16
    Evaluational Illusions and Skeptical Arguments.Steven L. Reynolds - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):529-558.
    A traditional diagnosis of the error in the Cartesian skeptical arguments holds that they exploit our tendencies to take a representationalist view of perception. Thinking that we perceive only our own sensory states, it seems to us that our perceptual beliefs about physical objects must be justified qua explanations of those sensory states. Such justification requires us to have reasons to reject rival explanations, such as the skeptical hypotheses, which we lack. However, those who adopt the direct realist view (...)
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  45.  32
    Evaluational Illusions and Skeptical Arguments.Steven L. Reynolds - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):529-558.
    A traditional diagnosis of the error in the Cartesian skeptical arguments holds that they exploit our tendencies to take a representationalist view of perception. Thinking (perhaps not too clearly) that we perceive only our own sensory states, it seems to us that our perceptual beliefs about physical objects must be justified qua explanations of those sensory states. Such justification requires us to have reasons to reject rival explanations, such as the skeptical hypotheses, which we lack. However, those who adopt (...)
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  46. Theory-Laden Experience and Illusions.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2011 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 4 (2):58-67.
    The persistence of certain illusions has been used to argue that some theories cannot affect our perceptual experiences. Learning that one of these illusions is an illusion involves accepting theories. Nevertheless, the illusion does not go away. It seems then that these theories cannot affect our perceptual experiences. This paper contests an assumption of this argument: that the only way in which our perceptions can be affected by holding these theories is by the illusion going away.
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  47.  2
    Review of Zur Kritik des Telepathischen Beweismaterials and Hallucinations and Illusions, a Study of the Fallacies of Perception[REVIEW]No Authorship Indicated - 1897 - Psychological Review 4 (6):657-658.
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  48. High-Level Perception and Multimodal Perception.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - forthcoming - In Heather Logue & Louise Richardson (eds.), Purpose and Procedure in Philosophy of Perception. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    What is the correct procedure for determining the contents of perception? Philosophers tackling this question increasingly rely on empirically-oriented procedures in order to reach an answer. I argue that this constitutes an improvement over the armchair methodology constitutive of phenomenal contrast cases, but that there is a crucial respect in which current empirical procedures remain limited: they are unimodal in nature, wrongly treating the senses as isolatable faculties. I thus have two aims: first, to motivate a reorientation of the (...)
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  49. Illusions of Affection: A Hyper-Illusory Account of Normative Valence.Mihailis Diamantis - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (5-6):6-29.
    This article challenges the orthodox position that some smells are pleasantly fragrant and some tactile sensations are painful. It proposes that the affective components of our experiences are a kind of illusion. Under this alternative picture, experiences that seem to have positive or negative affect never actually do. Rather, the affective component is hyper-illusory, a second-order misrepresentation of the way things actually seem to us. While perceptual hyperillusions have elicited scepticism in other contexts, affective hyperillusions can withstand common critiques. Focusing (...)
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  50.  46
    Strange-Face Illusions During Inter-Subjective Gazing.Giovanni B. Caputo - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):324-329.
    In normal observers, gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, triggers the perception of strange faces, a new visual illusion that has been named ‘strange-face in the mirror’. Individuals see huge distortions of their own faces, but they often see monstrous beings, archetypal faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and animals. In the experiment described here, strange-face illusions were perceived when two individuals, in a dimly lit room, gazed at (...)
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