Results for '*Pain Perception'

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  1.  97
    Pain: Perception or Introspection?Murat Aydede - 2017 - In Jennifer Corns (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Pain. Routledge.
    [Penultimate draft] I present the perceptualist/representationalist theories of pain in broad outline and critically examine them in light of a competing view according to which awareness of pain is essentially introspective. I end the essay with a positive sketch of a naturalistic proposal according to which pain experiences are intentional but not fully representational. This proposal makes sense of locating pains in body parts as well as taking pains as subjective experiences.
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  2. Pain Perception.George Pitcher - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (3):368.
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  3. Pain Perception, Affective Mechanisms, and Conscious Experience.C. Richard Chapman - 2004 - In Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & Kenneth D. Craig (eds.), Pain: Psychological Perspectives. pp. 59-85.
  4.  27
    Pain Perception, Brain and Consciousness.M. Tiengo - 2003 - Neurological Sciences 24:76- 79.
  5.  92
    Pain Perception in Disorders of Consciousness: Neuroscience, Clinical Care, and Ethics in Dialogue. [REVIEW]A. Demertzi, E. Racine, M.-A. Bruno, D. Ledoux, O. Gosseries, A. Vanhaudenhuyse, M. Thonnard, A. Soddu, G. Moonen & S. Laureys - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):37-50.
    Pain, suffering and positive emotions in patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious states (MCS) pose clinical and ethical challenges. Clinically, we evaluate behavioural responses after painful stimulation and also emotionally-contingent behaviours (e.g., smiling). Using stimuli with emotional valence, neuroimaging and electrophysiology technologies can detect subclinical remnants of preserved capacities for pain which might influence decisions about treatment limitation. To date, no data exist as to how healthcare providers think about end-of-life options (e.g., withdrawal of artificial nutrition (...)
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  6. Pain, Perception and the Sensory Modalities: Revisiting the Intensive Theory.Richard Gray - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):87-101.
    Pain is commonly explained in terms of the perceptual activity of a distinct sensory modality, the function of which is to enable us to perceive actual or potential damage to the body. However, the characterization of pain experience in terms of a distinct sensory modality with such content is problematic. I argue that pain is better explained as occupying a different role in relation to perception: to indicate when the stimuli that are sensed in perceiving anything by means of (...)
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  7. An Indirectly Realistic, Representational Account of Pain(Ed) Perception.Moreland Perkins - 2005 - In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
     
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  8.  15
    Pain and Perception.Joseph Margolis - 1976 - International Studies in Philosophy 8:3-12.
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  9.  6
    Pain Perception in Fish.Lynne Sneddon - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
    Pain assessment in fish is particularly challenging due toBioscience Building, Liverpool, L69 7ZB their evolutionary distance from humans, their lack of audible vocalization, and apparently expressionless demeanour. However, there are criteria that can be used to gauge whether pain perception occurs using carefully executed scientific approaches. Here, the standards for pain in fish are discussed and can be considered in three ways: neural detection and processing of pain; adverse responses to pain; and consciously experiencing pain. Many procedures that we (...)
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  10.  40
    Consciousness, Cortical Function, and Pain Perception in Nonverbal Humans.K. J. S. Anand - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):82-83.
    Postulating the subcortical organization of human consciousness provides a critical link for the construal of pain in patients with impaired cortical function or cortical immaturity during early development. Practical implications of the centrencephalic proposal include the redefinition of pain, improved pain assessment in nonverbal humans, and benefits of adequate analgesia/anesthesia for these patients, which certainly justify the rigorous scientific efforts required. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  11.  51
    Neurocognitive Aspects of Pain Perception.Katja Wiech, Markus Ploner & Irene Tracey - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (8):306-313.
  12.  31
    Pain Perception in Disorders of Consciousness: Neuroscience, Clinical Care, and Ethics in Dialogue.Athina Demertzi, Eric Racine, Marie-Aurélie Bruno, Didier Ledoux, Olivia Gosseries, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Marie Thonnard, Andrea Soddu, Gustave Moonen & Steven Laureys - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
  13.  2
    Atypical Susceptibility to the Rubber Hand Illusion Linked to Sensory-Localised Vicarious Pain Perception.V. Botan, S. Fan, H. Critchley & J. Ward - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 60:62-71.
  14.  6
    Independent Effects of Emotion and Attention on Sensory and Affective Pain Perception.Ramona Kenntner-Mabiala, Peter Weyers & Paul Pauli - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (8):1615-1629.
  15.  12
    Temperature and Pain Perception.Richard H. Gracely, Mickael J. Farrell & Masilo Ab Grant - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
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  16.  3
    Stress and Arousal in Pain Perception.Mortimer H. Appley - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):301.
  17. Differential Classical Conditioning of the Nocebo Effect: Increasing Heat-Pain Perception Without Verbal Suggestions.Anne-Kathrin Bräscher, Dieter Kleinböhl, Rupert Hölzl & Susanne Becker - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  18. Sub-Optimal Presentation of Painful Facial Expressions Enhances Readiness for Action and Pain Perception Following Electrocutaneous Stimulation.Ali Khatibi, Martien Schrooten, Katrien Bosmans, Stephanie Volders, Johan W. S. Vlaeyen & Eva Van den Bussche - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  19. Is Feeling Pain the Perception of Something?Murat Aydede - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (10):531-567.
    According to the increasingly popular perceptual/representational accounts of pain (and other bodily sensations such as itches, tickles, orgasms, etc.), feeling pain in a body region is perceiving a non-mental property or some objective condition of that region, typically equated with some sort of (actual or potential) tissue damage. In what follows I argue that given a natural understanding of what sensory perception requires and how it is integrated with (dedicated) conceptual systems, these accounts are mistaken. I will also examine (...)
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  20.  78
    Instrumental or Immersed Experience: Pleasure, Pain and Object Perception in Locke.Lisa Shapiro - 2010 - In CT Wolfe & O. Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. Springer. pp. 265--285.
  21. Savages, Drunks, and Lab Animals: The Researcher's Perception of Pain.Mary T. Phillips - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (1):61-81.
    Historically, treatment for pain relief has varied according to the social status of the sufferer. A similar tendency to make arbitrary distinctions affecting pain relief was found in an ethnographic study of animal research laboratories. The administration of pain-relieving drugs for animals in laboratories differed from standard practice for humans and, perhaps, for companion animals. Although anesthesia was used routinely for surgical procedures, its administration was sometimes haphazard. Analgesics, however, were rarely used. Most researchers had never thought about using analgesics (...)
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  22.  4
    The Effect of Pain and the Anticipation of Pain on Temporal Perception: A Role for Attention and Arousal.Ruth S. Ogden, David Moore, Leanne Redfern & Francis McGlone - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (5):910-922.
  23.  1
    Evaluation of a Prototype Tool for Communicating Body Perception Disturbances in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.Ailie J. Turton, Mark Palmer, Sharon Grieve, Timothy P. Moss, Jenny Lewis & Candida S. McCabe - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  24.  11
    The Close Proximity of Threat: Altered Distance Perception in the Anticipation of Pain.Abby Tabor, Mark J. Catley, Simon C. Gandevia, Michael A. Thacker, Charles Spence & G. L. Moseley - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  25.  20
    Anaxagoras on Perception, Pleasure, and Pain.James Warren - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:19-54.
  26.  5
    Pain and Perception.Nicholas Everitt - 1988 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 89:113 - 124.
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  27.  2
    Perception, Expression, and Social Function of Pain: A Human Ethological View.Wulf Schiefenhövel - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (1).
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  28.  1
    VIII—Pain and Perception.Nicholas Everitt - 1989 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 89 (1):113-124.
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  29. Pain and Perception.Joseph Margolis - 1976 - International Studies in Philosophy 8:3-12.
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  30. Galen on Sense Perception, His Doctrines, Observations and Experiments on Vision, Hearing, Smell, Taste, Touch and Pain, and Their Historical SourcesRudolf E. Siegel.Emilie Savage Smith - 1972 - Isis 63 (1):116-118.
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  31. Children’s Empathy and Their Perception and Evaluation of Facial Pain Expression: An Eye Tracking Study.Zhiqiang Yan, Meng Pei & Yanjie Su - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  32.  67
    The Inadequacy of Unitary Characterizations of Pain.Jennifer Corns - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (3):355-378.
    Though pain scientists now understand pain to be a complex experience typically composed of sensation, emotion, cognition, and motivational responses, many philosophers maintain that pain is adequately characterized by one privileged aspect of this complexity. Philosophically dominant unitary accounts of pain as a sensation or perception are here evaluated by their ability to explain actual cases—and found wanting. Further, it is argued that no forthcoming unitary characterization of pain is likely to succeed. Instead, I contend that both the motivating (...)
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  33. Naturalism, Introspection, and Direct Realism About Pain.Murat Aydede - 2001 - Consciousness and Emotion 2 (1):29-73.
    This paper examines pain states (and other intransitive bodily sensations) from the perspective of the problems they pose for pure informational/representational approaches to naturalizing qualia. I start with a comprehensive critical and quasi-historical discussion of so-called Perceptual Theories of Pain (e.g., Armstrong, Pitcher), as these were the natural predecessors of the more modern direct realist views. I describe the theoretical backdrop (indirect realism, sense-data theories) against which the perceptual theories were developed. The conclusion drawn is that pure representationalism about pain (...)
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  34. The Problem of Fetal Pain and Abortion: Toward an Ethical Consensus for Appropriate Behavior.E. Christian Brugger - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (3):263-287.
    This essay concerns what people should do in conflict situations when a doubt of fact bears on settling whether an alternative under consideration is legitimate or not. Its principal audience are those who believe that abortion can be legitimate when not having an abortion gives rise to serious harms that can be avoided by having one, but who are concerned that fetuses might feel pain when being aborted, and who believe that causing unnecessary pain should be avoided when doing so (...)
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  35.  59
    Measuring Pain: An Introspective Look at Introspection.Yutaka Nakamura & R. Chapman - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):582-592.
    The measurement of pain depends upon subjective reports, but we know very little about how research subjects or pain patients produce self-reported judgments. Representationalist assumptions dominate the field of pain research and lead to the critical conjecture that the person in pain examines the contents of consciousness before making a report about the sensory or affective magnitude of pain experience as well as about its nature. Most studies to date have investigated what Fechner termed “outer psychophysics”: the relationship between characteristics (...)
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  36.  30
    Integrating Experimental-Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness.D. Barrell Price & Rainville J. - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.
    Understanding the nature of pain at least partly depends on recognizing its inherent first person epistemology and on using a first person experiential and third person experimental approach to study it. This approach may help to understand some of the neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness by integrating experiential–phenomenological methods with those of neuroscience. Examples that approximate this strategy include studies of second pain summation and its relationship to neural activities and brain imaging-psychophysical studies wherein sensory and affective qualities of (...)
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  37.  70
    Perception And The Physical World.David M. Armstrong - 1961 - Humanities Press.
  38.  25
    The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain.David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet - 2005 - Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.
  39. Constructing Pain: How Pain Hurts.Yutaka Nakamura & C. Chapman - 2002 - In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins.
     
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  40.  10
    Hypnotic Regulation of Consciousness and the Pain Neuromatrix.Mélanie Boly Marie-Elisabeth Faymonville, Brent A. Vogt & Pierre Maquet Steven Laureys - 2007 - In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. pp. 15-27.
  41. The Perceptual Theory of Pain: A Response to Thomas Mayberry's, the Perceptual Theory of Pain.George Pitcher - 1978 - Philosophical Investigations 1:44-46.
     
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  42.  42
    Objective and Subjective Aspects of Pain.Nikola Grahek - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):249-66.
  43.  36
    Preferring More Pain to Less.Roy W. Perrett - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 93 (2):213-226.
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  44.  26
    Is the Concept of Pain Incoherent?R. Kaufman - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):279-84.
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  45.  8
    The Perceptual Theory of Pain: Another Look.Thomas C. Mayberry - 1979 - Philosophical Investigations 2 (1):53-55.
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  46.  1
    Pain And Other Problems: A Criticism Of Modern Philosophies.John C. Wordsworth - 1954 - Allen & Unwin.
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  47.  38
    Painfulness is Not a Quale.Austen Clark - 2005 - In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
    When you suffer a pain are you suffering a sensation? An emotion? An aversion? Pain typically has all three components, and others too. There is indeed a distinct sensory system devoted to pain, with its own nociceptors and pathways. As a species of somesthesis, pain has a distinctive sensory organization and its own special sensory qualities. I think it is fair to call it a distinct sensory modality, devoted to nociceptive somesthetic discrimination. But the typical pain kicks off other processes (...)
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  48. The Main Difficulty with Pain.Murat Aydede - 2005 - In Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press. pp. 123-136.
    Consider the following two sentences: " I see a dark discoloration in the back of my hand. I feel a jabbing pain in the back of my hand. " They seem to have the same surface grammar, and thus prima facie invite the same kind of semantic treatment. Even though a reading of ‘see’ in where the verb is not treated as a success verb is not out of the question, it is not the ordinary and natural reading. Note that (...)
     
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  49.  5
    Pain and Pleasure - A Special Issue of Review of Psychology & Philosophy.David Bain & Michael Brady (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
    Table of Contents: Olivier Massin, 'Pleasure and Its Contraries'; Colin Klein, 'The Penumbral Theory of Masochistic Pleasure'; Siri Leknes and Brock Bastian, 'The Benefits of Pain'; Valerie Gray Hardcastle, 'Pleasure Gone Awry? A New Conceptualization of Chronic Pain and Addiction'; Richard Gray, 'Pain, Perception and the Sensory Modalities: Revisiting the Intensive Theory'; Jonathan Cohen and Matthew Fulkerson, Affect, Rationalization, and Motivation; Murat Aydede, 'How to Unify Theories of Sensory Pleasure: An Adverbialist Proposal'; Adam Shriver, 'The Asymmetrical Contributions of Pleasure (...)
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  50. Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study.Murat Aydede (ed.) - 2005 - MIT Press.
    What does feeling a sharp pain in one's hand have in common with seeing a red apple on the table? Some say not much, apart from the fact that they are both conscious experiences. To see an object is to perceive an extramental reality -- in this case, a red apple. To feel a pain, by contrast, is to undergo a conscious experience that doesn't necessarily relate the subject to an objective reality. Perceptualists, however, dispute this. They say that both (...)
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