Results for '*Parietal Lobe'

840 found
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  1. Parietal lobe contributions to episodic memory retrieval.A. D. Wagner, B. J. Shannon, I. Kahn & R. L. Buckner - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):445-453.
  2.  47
    Numerical representation in the parietal lobes: Abstract or not abstract?Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):313-328.
    The study of neuronal specialisation in different cognitive and perceptual domains is important for our understanding of the human brain, its typical and atypical development, and the evolutionary precursors of cognition. Central to this understanding is the issue of numerical representation, and the question of whether numbers are represented in an abstract fashion. Here we discuss and challenge the claim that numerical representation is abstract. We discuss the principles of cortical organisation with special reference to number and also discuss methodological (...)
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  3.  16
    Evolution of the Parietal Lobe in the Formation of an Enhanced “Sense of Self”.Daniel Cohen & Brick Johnstone - 2024 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 24 (1-2):91-120.
    Recent neuropaleontological research suggests that the parietal lobe has increased in size as much as the frontal lobes in Homo Sapiens over the past 150,000 years, but has not provided a neuropsychological explanation for the evolution of human socialization or the development of religion. Drawing from several areas of research, (i.e., neurodevelopment, neuropsychology, paleoneurology, cognitive science, archeology, and anthropology), we argue that parietal evolution in Homo sapiens integrated sensations and mental processes into a more integrated subjective “sense of self”. (...)
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  4. Parietal lobe syndromes.E. C. O. Jewesbury - 1969 - In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. pp. 2--680.
     
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  5. Anosognosia in parietal lobe syndrome.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):22-51.
    Patients with right parietal lesions often deny their paralysis , but do they have "tacit" knowledge of their paralysis? I devised three novel tests to explore this. First, the patients were given a choice between a bimanual task vs a unimanual one . They chose the former on 17 of 18 trials and, surprisingly, showed no frustration or learning despite repeated failed attempts. I conclude that they have no tacit knowledge of paralysis . Second, I used a "virtual reality box" (...)
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  6. Attention, Intention, and Priority in the Parietal Lobe.James W. Bisley & Michael E. Goldberg - 2010 - Annual Review of Neuroscience 33:1-21.
    For many years there has been a debate about the role of the parietal lobe in the generation of behavior. Does it generate movement plans (intention) or choose objects in the environment for further processing? To answer this, we focus on the lateral intraparietal area (LIP), an area that has been shown to play independent roles in target selection for saccades and the generation of visual attention. Based on results from a variety of tasks, we propose that LIP acts (...)
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  7.  50
    Left inferior-parietal lobe activity in perspective tasks: identity statements.Aditi Arora, Benjamin Weiss, Matthias Schurz, Markus Aichhorn, Rebecca C. Wieshofer & Josef Perner - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  8.  24
    The left inferior parietal lobe represents stored hand-postures for object use and action prediction.Michiel van Elk - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  9.  8
    Closing-in Behavior and Parietal Lobe Deficits: Three Single Cases Exhibiting Different Manifestations of the Same Behavior.Elisabetta Ambron, Luca Piretti, Alberta Lunardelli & H. Branch Coslett - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  10.  30
    Temporo-parietal and fronto-parietal lobe contributions to theory of mind and executive control: an fMRI study of verbal jokes.Yu-Chen Chan & Joseph P. Lavallee - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  11.  5
    The importance of the parietal lobes for consciousness.J. G. Taylor - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):379-417.
  12.  14
    Is the parietal lobe guilty of association?Eduardo Eidelberg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):501-502.
  13.  69
    Spatial awareness is a function of the temporal not the posterior parietal lobe.Hans-Otto Karnath, Susanne Ferber & Marc Himmelbach - 2001 - Nature 411 (6840):951-953.
  14.  29
    The priming method: Imaging unconscious repetition priming reveals an abstract representation of number in the parietal lobes.Lionel Naccache & Stanislas Dehaene - 2001 - Cerebral Cortex 11 (10):966-974.
  15.  50
    Spatial awareness: A function of the posterior parietal lobe?John C. Marshall, Gereon R. Fink, Peter W. Halligan & Giuseppe Vallar - 2002 - Cortex 38 (2):253-257.
  16.  46
    The ‘when’ pathway of the right parietal lobe.Lorella Battelli, Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Patrick Cavanagh - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):204-210.
  17.  46
    The central role of the parietal lobes in consciousness.John G. Taylor - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):379-417.
    There are now various approaches to understand where and how in the brain consciousness arises from neural activity, none of which is universally accepted. Difficulties among these approaches are reviewed, and a missing ingredient is proposed here to help adjudicate between them, that of ''perspectivalness.'' In addition to a suitable temporal duration and information content of the relevant bound brain activity, this extra component is posited as being a further important ingredient for the creation of consciousness from neural activity. It (...)
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  18.  37
    Some further observations on the functional properties of neurons in the parietal lobe of the waking monkey.V. B. Mountcastle, B. C. Motter & R. A. Andersen - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):520-523.
  19.  21
    Disturbances in spatial attention following lesion or disconnection of the right parietal lobe.Michael S. Gazzaniga & Elisabetta Ladavas - 1987 - In M. Jeannerod (ed.), Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Aspects of Spatial Neglect. Elsevier Science. pp. 45--203.
  20. Multimodal spatial representations in the primate parietal lobe.Yale E. Cohen & Andersen & A. Richard - 2004 - In Charles Spence & Jon Driver (eds.), Crossmodal Space and Crossmodal Attention. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21.  18
    Multimodal spatial representations in the primate parietal lobe.Yale E. Cohen & Richard A. Andersen - 2004 - In Charles Spence & Jon Driver (eds.), Crossmodal Space and Crossmodal Attention. Oxford University Press. pp. 154--176.
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  22.  38
    The 'when' pathway of the right parietal lobe.Patrick Cavanagh Lorella Battelli, Alvaro Pascual-Leone - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):204.
  23.  22
    An anatomical basis for the functional specialization of the parietal lobe in directed attention.M.-Marsel Mesulam - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):510-511.
  24. Distinguishing intentions from desires: Contributions of the frontal and parietal lobes.Claudia Chiavarino, Ian A. Apperly & Glyn W. Humphreys - 2010 - Cognition 117 (2):203-216.
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  25.  17
    The hippocampus and its apparent migration to the parietal lobe.Robert J. Douglas - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):498-499.
  26.  9
    Phonological Working Memory Representations in the Left Inferior Parietal Lobe in the Face of Distraction and Neural Stimulation.Qiuhai Yue & Randi C. Martin - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    The neural basis of phonological working memory was investigated through an examination of the effects of irrelevant speech distractors and disruptive neural stimulation from transcranial magnetic stimulation. Embedded processes models argue that the same regions involved in speech perception are used to support phonological WM whereas buffer models assume that a region separate from speech perception regions is used to support WM. Thus, according to the embedded processes approach but not the buffer approach, irrelevant speech and TMS to the speech (...)
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  27.  27
    The Parietal and Occipital Lobes and the Development of Consciousness: Some Preliminary Thoughts.Walter Randolph Adams - 1993 - Anthropology of Consciousness 4 (3):19-22.
  28.  19
    Response field biases in parietal, temporal, and frontal lobe visual areas.Charles J. Bruce & Martha G. MacAvoy - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):546-547.
  29. Space and the parietal cortex.Masud Husain & Parashkev Nachev - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):30-36.
    Current views of the parietal cortex have difficulty accommodating the human inferior parietal lobe (IPL) within a simple dorsal versus ventral stream dichotomy. In humans, lesions of the right IPL often lead to syndromes such as hemispatial neglect that are seemingly in accord with the proposal that this region has a crucial role in spatial processing. However, recent imaging and lesion studies have revealed that inferior parietal regions have non-spatial functions, such as in sustaining attention, detecting salient events embedded (...)
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  30.  88
    Parietal somatosensory association cortex mediates affective blindsight.Silke Anders, Niels Birbaumer, Bettina Sadowski, Michael Erb, Irina Mader, Wolfgang Grodd & Martin Lotze - 2004 - Nature Neuroscience 7 (4):339-340.
  31.  69
    Common fronto-parietal activity in attention, memory, and consciousness: Shared demands on integration?Hamid Reza Naghavi & Lars Nyberg - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):390-425.
    Fronto-parietal activity has been frequently observed in fMRI and PET studies of attention, working memory, and episodic memory retrieval. Several recent fMRI studies have also reported fronto-parietal activity during conscious visual perception. A major goal of this review was to assess the degree of anatomical overlap among activation patterns associated with these four functions. A second goal was to shed light on the possible cognitive relationship of processes that relate to common brain activity across functions. For all reviewed functions we (...)
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  32.  46
    The functional organization of posterior parietal association cortex.James C. Lynch - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):485-499.
    Posterior parietal cortex has traditionally been considered to be a sensory association area in which higher-order processing and intermodal integration of incoming sensory information occurs. In this paper, evidence from clinical reports and from lesion and behavioral-electrophysiological experiments using monkeys is reviewed and discussed in relation to the overall functional organization of posterior parietal association cortex, and particularly with respect to a proposed posterior parietal mechanism concerned with the initiation and control of certain classes of eye and limb movements. Preliminary (...)
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  33.  26
    Divisions within the posterior parietal cortex help touch meet vision.Catherine L. Reed - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):218-218.
    The parietal cortex is divided into two major functional regions: the anterior parietal cortex that includes primary somatosensory cortex, and the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that includes the rest of the parietal lobe. The PPC contains multiple representations of space. In Dijkerman & de Haan's (D&dH's) model, higher spatial representations are separate from PPC functions. This model should be developed further so that the functions of the somatosensory system are integrated with specific functions within the PPC and higher spatial (...)
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  34.  44
    The role of parietal cortex in awareness of self-generated movements: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.Penny A. MacDonald & Tomás Paus - 2003 - Cerebral Cortex 13 (9):962-967.
  35.  59
    Unconscious activation of visual cortex in the damaged right hemisphere of a parietal patient with extinction.Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver - 2000 - Brain 123 (8):1624-1633.
  36.  24
    Frontal lobe functions in reading: Evidence from dyslexic children performing nonreading saccade tasks.Burkhart Fischer - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):484-486.
    Reichle et al. show that saccades in reading are controlled by linguistic processing. The authors' Figure 13 shows the parietal and frontal eye fields as parts of a neural implementation. This commentary presents data from dyslexics performing nonreading saccade tasks. The dyslexics exhibit deficits in antisaccade control. Improvement of the deficits is achieved in 85% of the cases and results in advantages in learning how to read.
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  37.  67
    Direct evidence for a parietal-frontal pathway subserving spatial awareness in humans.Michel T. de Schotten, Marika Urbanski, Hugues Duffau, Emmanuelle Volle, Richard Lévy, Bruno Dubois & Paolo Bartolomeo - 2005 - Science 309 (5744):2226-2228.
  38. Cognitive contributions of the ventral parietal cortex: an integrative theoretical account.Roberto Cabeza, Elisa Ciaramelli & Morris Moscovitch - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):338-352.
  39.  68
    Neural correlates of conscious and unconscious vision in parietal extinction.Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain & Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Neurocase 8 (5):387-393.
  40.  33
    The neural basis of imitative behavior: Parietal actions and frontal programs.Naoyasu Motomura - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):700-701.
    Byrne & Russon suggest that there are two kinds of imitation learning – action level and program level – and that the latter is critical for great apes' learning. I have interpreted this phenomenon from the standpoint of clinical neuropsychology and conjecture that action-level imitation might be related to parietal lobe function and program-level imitation might be related to frontal lobe function.
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  41. Topographic maps in human frontal and parietal cortex.Michael A. Silver & Sabine Kastner - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):488-495.
  42.  21
    Neglecting the posterior parietal cortex: The role of higher-order perceptual memories for working-memory retention.Axel Mecklinger & Bertram Opitz - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):749-749.
    The view that posterior brain systems engaged in lower-order perceptual functions are activated during sustained retention is challenged by fMRI data, which show consistent retention-related activation of higher-order memory representations for a variety of working-memory materials. Sustained retention entails the dynamic link of these higher-order memories with schemata for goal-oriented action housed by the frontal lobes.
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  43. Illusory persistence of touch after right parietal damage: Neural correlates of tactile awareness.Sophie Schwartz, Frédéric Assal, Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2005 - Brain 128 (2):277-290.
  44.  27
    The control process is represented in both the inferior and superior parietal lobules.David E. Vaillancourt, Mary A. Mayka & Daniel M. Corcos - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):51-52.
    Glover postulates that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL), along with the frontal lobes and basal ganglia, mediates planning, while the superior parietal lobule (SPL), coupled with motor processes in the cerebellum, regulates the control process. We demonstrate that the control process extends beyond the cerebellum and SPL into regions hypothesized to represent planning.
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  45. Richard A. Andersen David zipser.Parietal Cortex - 1990 - In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press. pp. 271.
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  46.  5
    A Toolkit for Democratizing Science and Technology Policy: The Practical Mechanics of Organizing a Consensus Conference.Carol Lobes, Judith Adrian, Joshua Grice, Maria Powell & Daniel Lee Kleinman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (2):154-169.
    A widely touted approach to involving laypeople in science and technology policy-related decisions is the consensus conference. Virtually nothing written on the topic provides detailed discussion of the many steps from citizen recruitment to citizen report. Little attention is paid to how and why the mechanics of the consensus conference process might influence the diversity of the participants in theses fora, the quality of the deliberation in the citizen sessions, the experiences of the participants and organizers, and other outcomes that (...)
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  47.  26
    Conditional genome alteration in mice.Corrinne G. Lobe & Andras Nagy - 1998 - Bioessays 20 (3):200-208.
    The recent ability to inactivate specific genes in mice has significantly accelerated our understanding of molecular, cellular, and even behavioral aspects of normal and disease processes. However, this ability has also demonstrated the extreme complexity of genetic determination in mammals, in particular, that genes in the same family or pathway can be functionally redundant and that a given gene often has multiple roles. Thus, inactivation of a gene often does not indicate its complete spectrum of functions. To circumvent this problem, (...)
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  48. Neural correlates of visuospatial consciousness in 3D default space: Insights from contralateral neglect syndrome.Ravinder Jerath & Molly W. Crawford - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 28:81-93.
    One of the most compelling questions still unanswered in neuroscience is how consciousness arises. In this article, we examine visual processing, the parietal lobe, and contralateral neglect syndrome as a window into consciousness and how the brain functions as the mind and we introduce a mechanism for the processing of visual information and its role in consciousness. We propose that consciousness arises from integration of information from throughout the body and brain by the thalamus and that the thalamus reimages (...)
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  49. tive approach to elucidating the mechanism of organic behavior changes is more likely to clarify the basis of functional psychosis, by analogy, than the current Procrustean application of psychiatric nosology.Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - 1979 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2. pp. 78.
     
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  50.  7
    HD-tDCS of primary and higher-order motor cortex affects action word processing.Karim Johari, Nicholas Riccardi, Svetlana Malyutina, Mirage Modi & Rutvik H. Desai - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16:959455.
    The contribution of action-perception systems of the brain to lexical semantics remains controversial. Here, we used high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) in healthy adults to examine the role of primary (left hand motor area; HMA) and higher-order (left anterior inferior parietal lobe; aIPL) action areas in action-related word processing (action verbs and manipulable nouns) compared to non-action-related control words (non-action verbs and non-manipulable nouns). We investigated stimulation-related effects at three levels of semantic processing: subliminal, implicit, and explicit. Broadly, (...)
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