Results for '*Somatosensory Cortex'

1000+ found
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  1.  79
    Parietal Somatosensory Association Cortex Mediates Affective Blindsight.Silke Anders, Niels Birbaumer, Bettina Sadowski, Michael Erb, Irina Mader, Wolfgang Grodd & Martin Lotze - 2004 - Nature Neuroscience 7 (4):339-340.
  2.  44
    Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex.S. King Joseph, Xie Mix, Zheng Bibo & H. Pribram Karl - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (3):327-349.
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation (...)
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  3.  13
    Asymmetric Functional Connectivity of the Contra- and Ipsilateral Secondary Somatosensory Cortex During Tactile Object Recognition.Yinghua Yu, Jiajia Yang, Yoshimichi Ejima, Hidenao Fukuyama & Jinglong Wu - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  4.  10
    Beyond the Peak – Tactile Temporal Discrimination Does Not Correlate with Individual Peak Frequencies in Somatosensory Cortex.J. Baumgarten Thomas, Schnitzler Alfons & Lange Joachim - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  5.  7
    Meditation Reduces Pain-Related Neural Activity in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Insula, Secondary Somatosensory Cortex, and Thalamus.Hiroki Nakata, Kiwako Sakamoto & Ryusuke Kakigi - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  6.  11
    Individual fMRI Maps of All Phalanges and Digit Bases of All Fingers in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex.Meike A. Schweisfurth, Jens Frahm & Renate Schweizer - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  7.  11
    Repetitive Passive Finger Movement Modulates Primary Somatosensory Cortex Excitability.Ryoki Sasaki, Shota Tsuiki, Shota Miyaguchi, Sho Kojima, Kei Saito, Yasuto Inukai, Naofumi Otsuru & Hideaki Onishi - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  8.  23
    Role of Secondary Somatosensory Cortex in Haptic Change Detection: A MEG Study.Vaulet Thibaut, Naeije Gilles, Op De Beek Marc, Wens Vincent, Marty Brice, Goldman Serge & De Tiège Xavier - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  9.  3
    Comparison of fMRI Digit Representations of the Dominant and Non-Dominant Hand in the Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex.Meike A. Schweisfurth, Jens Frahm, Dario Farina & Renate Schweizer - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  10.  5
    Polarity-Specific Cortical Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Primary Somatosensory Cortex of Healthy Humans.Robert Rehmann, Matthias Sczesny-Kaiser, Melanie Lenz, Tomasz Gucia, Annika Schliesing, Peter Schwenkreis, Martin Tegenthoff & Oliver Höffken - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  11.  20
    Activation of Sensory Cortex by Imagined Genital Stimulation: An fMRI Analysis.Nan J. Wise, Eleni Frangos & Barry R. Komisaruk - 2016 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
    BackgroundDuring the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation.ObjectiveThis study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical ‘touch’ stimulation and ‘imagined’ stimulation.DesignEleven healthy women participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions – imagined (...)
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  12.  20
    Weak but Critical Links Between Primary Somatosensory Centers and Motor Cortex During Movement.Pengxu Wei, Ruixue Bao, Zeping Lv & Bin Jing - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  13.  27
    Early Neural Correlates of Conscious Somatosensory Perception.Satu Palva, Klaus Linkenkaer-Hansen, Risto Näätänen & J. Matias Palva - 2005 - Journal of Neuroscience 25 (21):5248-5258.
  14.  16
    Now You Feel It--Now You Don't: ERP Correlates of Somatosensory Awareness.Ruth Schubert, Felix Blankenburg, Steven Lemm, Arno Villringer & Gabriel Curio - 2006 - Psychophysiology 43 (1):31-40.
  15.  14
    The Cortical Sensory Representation of Genitalia in Women and Men: A Systematic Review.Fadwa Cazala, Nicolas Vienney & Serge Stoléru - 2015 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 5.
    Background. Although genital sensations are an essential aspect of sexual behavior, the cortical somatosensory representation of genitalia in women and men remain poorly known and contradictory results have been reported. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of studies based on electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies, with the aim to identify insights brought by modern methods since the early descriptions of the sensory homunculus in the primary somatosensory cortex . Results. The review supports the interpretation that there are two distinct (...)
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  16.  77
    The Simulation of Smiles (SIMS) Model: Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression.Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):417.
    Recent application of theories of embodied or grounded cognition to the recognition and interpretation of facial expression of emotion has led to an explosion of research in psychology and the neurosciences. However, despite the accelerating number of reported findings, it remains unclear how the many component processes of emotion and their neural mechanisms actually support embodied simulation. Equally unclear is what triggers the use of embodied simulation versus perceptual or conceptual strategies in determining meaning. The present article integrates behavioral research (...)
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  17.  29
    On the Neural Correlates of Object Recognition Awareness: Relationship to Computational Activities and Activities Mediating Perceptual Awareness.Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):51-77.
    Based on theoretical considerations of Aurell (1979) and Block (1995), we argue that object recognition awareness is distinct from purely sensory awareness and that the former is mediated by neuronal activities in areas that are separate and distinct from cortical sensory areas. We propose that two of the principal functions of neuronal activities in sensory cortex, which are to provide sensory awareness and to effect the computations that are necessary for object recognition, are dissociated. We provide examples of how (...)
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  18. An Information Theoretical Approach to Prefrontal Executive Function.Etienne Koechlin & Christopher Summerfield - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):229-235.
  19.  28
    Localization of Tactile Stimuli Depends on Conscious Detection.Justin A. Harris, Lisa Karlov & Colin W. G. Clifford - 2006 - Journal of Neuroscience 26 (3):948-952.
  20.  93
    Illusory Persistence of Touch After Right Parietal Damage: Neural Correlates of Tactile Awareness.Sophie Schwartz, Frédéric Assal, Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2005 - Brain 128 (2):277-290.
  21.  18
    Divisions Within the Posterior Parietal Cortex Help Touch Meet Vision.Catherine L. Reed - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):218-218.
    The parietal cortex is divided into two major functional regions: the anterior parietal cortex that includes primary somatosensory cortex, and the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that includes the rest of the parietal lobe. The PPC contains multiple representations of space. In Dijkerman & de Haan's (D&dH's) model, higher spatial representations are separate from PPC functions. This model should be developed further so that the functions of the somatosensory system are integrated with specific functions within the PPC (...)
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  22.  24
    Multifaceted Functional Specialization of Somatosensory Information Processing.K. Sathian, Simon Lacey, Gregory Gibson & Randall Stilla - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):219-220.
    We review evidence for multifaceted functional specialization of somatosensory information processing, both within and outside classical somatosensory cortex. We argue that the nature of such specialization has not yet been clarified adequately to regard the proposed action/perception dichotomy as being established. However, we believe this is a good working hypothesis that can motivate further work.
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  23.  9
    Revisiting Parallel and Serial Processing in the Somatosensory System.Preston E. Garraghty - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):208-209.
    The issue of whether information is processed in parallel or in series in the somatosensory system is complicated by a number of factors. Included among these is the failure on the part of the scientific community to reach a consensus as to what actually constitutes the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in higher primates. A second, related issue is the marked difference in the organization of the cortical areas subserving somatosensation across species.
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  24.  47
    Somatosensory Processes Subserving Perception and Action.H. Chris Dijkerman & Edward H. F. de Haan - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):189-201.
    The functions of the somatosensory system are multiple. We use tactile input to localize and experience the various qualities of touch, and proprioceptive information to determine the position of different parts of the body with respect to each other, which provides fundamental information for action. Further, tactile exploration of the characteristics of external objects can result in conscious perceptual experience and stimulus or object recognition. Neuroanatomical studies suggest parallel processing as well as serial processing within the cerebral somatosensory system that (...)
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  25.  41
    Doing It . . . Wild? On the Role of the Cerebral Cortex in Human Sexual Activity.Janniko R. Georgiadis - 2012 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Background: We like to think about sexual activity as something fixed, basic and primal. However, this does not seem to fully capture reality. Even when we relish sex, we may be capable of mentalizing, talking, voluntarily postponing orgasm, and much more. This might indicate that the central control mechanisms of sexual activity are quite flexible and susceptible to learning mechanisms, and that cortical brain areas play a critical part. Objective: This study aimed to identify those cortical areas and mechanisms most (...)
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  26.  10
    A Hemispheric Asymmetry in Somatosensory Processing.Giuseppe Vallar - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):223-224.
    The model presented in the target article includes feature processing and higher representations. I argue, based on neuropsychological evidence, that spatial representations are also involved in perceptual awareness of somatosensory events. Second, there is an asymmetry, with a right-hemisphere–based bilateral representation of the body. Third, the specific aspect of bodily awareness concerning motor function monitoring involves a network that includes the premotor cortex.
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  27.  20
    Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience.Daniel A. Pollen - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times for (...)
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  28. Attention in Bodily Awareness.Gregor Hochstetter - 2016 - Synthese 193 (12):3819-3842.
    The aim of this paper is to develop and defend an Attentional View of bodily awareness, on which attention is necessary for bodily awareness. The original formulation of the Attentional View is due to Marcel Kinsbourne. First, I will show that the Attentional View of bodily awareness as formulated by Kinsbourne is superior to other accounts in the literature for characterizing the relationship between attention and bodily awareness. Kinsbourne’s account is the only account in the literature so far which can (...)
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  29.  74
    Sensations and Pain Processes.Kenneth J. Sufka & Michael P. Lynch - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (3):299-311.
    This paper discusses recent neuroscientific research that indicates a solution for what we label the ''causal problem'' of pain qualia, the problem of how the brain generates pain qualia. In particular, the data suggest that pain qualia naturally supervene on activity in a specific brain region: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The first section of this paper discusses several philosophical concerns regarding the nature of pain qualia. The second section overviews the current state of knowledge regarding the neuroanatomy and (...)
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  30.  1
    Lo Statuto Metodologico dei Contenuti Intenzionali.Silvano Zipoli Caiani - 2019 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 10 (3):265-281.
    Riassunto: Il dibattito in filosofia della mente è caratterizzato dal crescente interesse per nuove forme di eliminativismo, note con il nome di teorie enattiviste radicali della mente. Secondo la concezione enattivista radicale, il contenuto intenzionale di uno stato mentale è empiricamente sottodeterminato, pertanto non può essere utilizzato quale elemento di una spiegazione naturalistica del comportamento. Tuttavia, sebbene il riferimento ai contenuti intenzionali non sia conciliabile con il naturalismo ontologico, esso è invece compatibile con una forma di naturalismo metodologico. Seguendo l’analisi (...)
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  31.  17
    Modified Action as a Determinant of Adult and Age-Related Sensorimotor Integration: Where Does It Begin?Hubert R. Dinse - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):885-886.
    Modified action, either artificially induced or occurring naturally during life-span, alters organization and processing of primary somatosensory cortex, thereby serving as a predictor of age-related changes. These findings, together with the interconnectedness between motor-sensory systems and temporally-distributed processing across hierarchical levels, throws into question a sharp division between early perception and cognition, and suggest that composite codes of perception and action might not be limited to higher areas.
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  32. Minority Reports: Consciousness and the Prefrontal Cortex.Matthias Michel & Jorge Morales - 2019 - Mind and Language:1-21.
    Whether the prefrontal cortex is part of the neural substrates of consciousness is currently debated. Against prefrontal theories of consciousness, many have argued that neural activity in the prefrontal cortex does not correlate with consciousness but with subjective reports. We defend prefrontal theories of consciousness against this argument. We surmise that the requirement for reports is not a satisfying explanation of the difference in neural activity between conscious and unconscious trials, and that prefrontal theories of consciousness come out (...)
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  33. Consciousness Without a Cerbral Cortex: A Challenge for Neuroscience and Medicine.Bjorn Merker - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):63-81.
    A broad range of evidence regarding the functional organization of the vertebrate brain – spanning from comparative neurology to experimental psychology and neurophysiology to clinical data – is reviewed for its bearing on conceptions of the neural organization of consciousness. A novel principle relating target selection, action selection, and motivation to one another, as a means to optimize integration for action in real time, is introduced. With its help, the principal macrosystems of the vertebrate brain can be seen to form (...)
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  34. The Link Between Brain Learning, Attention, and Consciousness.Stephen Grossberg - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (1):1-44.
    The processes whereby our brains continue to learn about a changing world in a stable fashion throughout life are proposed to lead to conscious experiences. These processes include the learning of top-down expectations, the matching of these expectations against bottom-up data, the focusing of attention upon the expected clusters of information, and the development of resonant states between bottom-up and top-down processes as they reach an attentive consensus between what is expected and what is there in the outside world. It (...)
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  35.  9
    Damage to Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Judgment of Harmful Intent.Liane Young, Antoine Bechara, Daniel Tranel, Hanna Damasio, Marc Hauser & Antonio Damasio - 2010 - Neuron 65 (6):845-851.
    Moral judgments, whether delivered in ordinary experience or in the courtroom, depend on our ability to infer intentions. We forgive unintentional or accidental harms and condemn failed attempts to harm. Prior work demonstrates that patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex deliver abnormal judgments in response to moral dilemmas and that these patients are especially impaired in triggering emotional responses to inferred or abstract events, as opposed to real or actual outcomes. We therefore predicted that VMPC patients would (...)
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  36.  29
    Domain-General and Domain-Specific Patterns of Activity Support Metacognition in Human Prefrontal Cortex.Jorge Morales, Hakwan Lau & Stephen M. Fleming - 2018 - The Journal of Neuroscience 38 (14):3534-3546.
    Metacognition is the capacity to evaluate the success of one's own cognitive processes in various domains; for example, memory and perception. It remains controversial whether metacognition relies on a domain-general resource that is applied to different tasks or if self-evaluative processes are domain specific. Here, we investigated this issue directly by examining the neural substrates engaged when metacognitive judgments were made by human participants of both sexes during perceptual and memory tasks matched for stimulus and performance characteristics. By comparing patterns (...)
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  37.  80
    Striate Cortex (V1) Activity Gates Awareness of Motion.Juha Silvanto, Alan Cowey, Nilli Lavie & Vincent Walsh - 2005 - Nature Neuroscience 8 (2):143-144.
    A key question in understanding visual awareness is whether any single cortical area is indispensable. In a transcranial magnetic stimulation experiment, we show that observers' awareness of activity in extrastriate area VS depends on the amount of activity in striate cortex (Vl). From the timing and pattern of effects, we infer that back-projections from extrastriate cortex influence information content in Vl, but it is Vl that determines whether that information reaches awareness.
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  38.  26
    The Role of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Prediction Error and Signaling Surprise.William H. Alexander & Joshua W. Brown - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):119-135.
    In the past two decades, reinforcement learning has become a popular framework for understanding brain function. A key component of RL models, prediction error, has been associated with neural signals throughout the brain, including subcortical nuclei, primary sensory cortices, and prefrontal cortex. Depending on the location in which activity is observed, the functional interpretation of prediction error may change: Prediction errors may reflect a discrepancy in the anticipated and actual value of reward, a signal indicating the salience or novelty (...)
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  39.  31
    Retroactive Enhancement of a Skin Sensation by a Delayed Cortical Stimulus in Man: Evidence for Delay of a Conscious Sensory Experience.Benjamin W. Libet, E. W. Wright, B. Feinstein & D. K. Pearl - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (3):367-75.
    Sensation elicited by a skin stimulus was subjectively reported to feel stronger when followed by a stimulus to somatosensory cerebral cortex , even when C was delayed by up to 400 ms or more. This expands the potentiality for retroactive effects beyond that previously known as backward masking. It also demonstrates that the content of a sensory experience can be altered by another cerebral input introduced after the sensory signal arrives at the cortex. The long effective S-C intervals (...)
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  40.  55
    Mechanisms of Visual Perceptual Learning in Macaque Visual Cortex.Rufin Vogels - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (2):239-250.
    The neural mechanisms underlying behavioral improvement in the detection or discrimination of visual stimuli following learning are still ill understood. Studies in nonhuman primates have shown relatively small and, across studies, variable effects of fine discrimination learning in primary visual cortex when tested outside the context of the learned task. At later stages, such as extrastriate area V4, extensive practice in fine discrimination produces more consistent effects upon responses and neural tuning. In V1 and V4, the effects of learning (...)
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  41.  5
    Retroactive Enhancement of a Skin Sensation by a Delayed Cortical Stimulus in Man: Evidence for Delay of a Conscious Sensory Experience.B. Libet, E. Wright, B. Feinstein & D. Pearl - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (3):367-375.
    Sensation elicited by a skin stimulus was subjectively reported to feel stronger when followed by a stimulus to somatosensory cerebral cortex, even when C was delayed by up to 400 ms or more. This expands the potentiality for retroactive effects beyond that previously known as backward masking. It also demonstrates that the content of a sensory experience can be altered by another cerebral input introduced after the sensory signal arrives at the cortex. The long effective S-C intervals support (...)
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  42.  38
    The Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Akinetic Mutism, and Human Volition.Paul E. Tibbetts - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (3):323-341.
    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)has been identified as part of a supervisoryattentional network for selecting alternativemotor programs in response to top-down corticalprocessing, particularly in situationsinvolving conflicting cognitive tasks.Bilateral lesions to the ACC may be causallyassociated with akinetic mutism, where patientsare unable to voluntarily initiate responses.The clinical and neuroanatomical evidence forthis presumed causal association is examined atlength. However, given the many reciprocalprojections between cerebral, motor, limbic andparalimbic structures within the executivesupervisory network, the association ofvoluntary behavior with a particular structure(the ACC) (...)
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  43.  12
    Close Coordination Between Recognition and Action: Really Two Separate Streams?Markus Graf - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):210-211.
    Somewhat in contrast to their proposal of two separate somatosensory streams, Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) propose that tactile recognition involves active manual exploration, and therefore involves parietal cortex. I argue that interactions from perception for action to object recognition can be found also in vision. Furthermore, there is evidence that perception for action and perception for recognition rely on similar processing principles.
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  44.  2
    Face Neurons.Edmund Rolls - 2011 - In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Neurophysiological evidence showing that some neurons in the macaque inferior temporal visual cortex and cortex in the superior temporal sulcus have responses that are invariant with respect to the position, size, and in some cases view of faces, and that these neurons show rapid processing and rapid learning. This chapter provides a whole area of research which show how taste, olfactory, visual, and somatosensory reward is decoded and represented in the orbitofrontal cortex and has led to a (...)
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  45.  33
    Insensitivity to Future Consequences Following Damage to Human Prefrontal Cortex.Antoine Bechara, Antonio R. Damasio, Hanna Damasio & Steven W. Anderson - 1993 - Cognition 50 (1-3):7-15.
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  46.  84
    Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex.Amit Etkin, Tobias Egner & Raffael Kalisch - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.
  47.  65
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex.Adam R. Aron, Trevor W. Robbins & Russell A. Poldrack - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):170-177.
  48.  28
    An Integrative Theory of Prefrontal Cortex Function.Earl K. Miller & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2001 - Annual Review of Neuroscience 24 (1):167-202.
    The prefrontal cortex has long been suspected to play an important role in cognitive control, in the ability to orchestrate thought and action in accordance with internal goals. Its neural basis, however, has remained a mystery. Here, we propose that cognitive control stems from the active maintenance of patterns of activity in the prefrontal cortex that represent goals and the means to achieve them. They provide bias signals to other brain structures whose net effect is to guide the (...)
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  49.  23
    The Functional Organization of Posterior Parietal Association Cortex.James C. Lynch - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):485-499.
  50.  22
    The Representation of Egocentric Space in the Posterior Parietal Cortex.J. F. Stein - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):691-700.
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