Results for '*Verbal Communication'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Aristotle on Verbal Communication: The First Chapters of De Interpretatione.Anita Kasabova & Vladimir Marinov - 2016 - Empedocles European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 7 (2):239-253.
    ABSTRACT This article deals with the communicational aspects of Aristotle’s theory of signification as laid out in the initial chapters of the De Interpretatione (Int.).1 We begin by outlining the reception and main interpretations of the chapters under discussion, rather siding with the linguistic strand. We then argue that the first four chapters present an account of verbal communication, in which words signify things via thoughts. We show how Aristotle determines voice as a conventional and hence accidental medium of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    The Bursts and Lulls of Multimodal Interaction: Temporal Distributions of Behavior Reveal Differences Between Verbal and Non‐Verbal Communication.Drew H. Abney, Rick Dale, Max M. Louwerse & Christopher T. Kello - forthcoming - Cognitive Science.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  59
    Mindreading and Verbal Communication.Anna Papafragou - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (1-2):55–67.
    The idea that verbal communication involves a species of mindreading is not new. Among linguists and philosophers, largely as a result of Grice’s (1957, 1967) influence, it has long been recognized that the act of communicating involves on the part of the communicator and the addressee mutual metarepresentations of each others’ mental states. In psychology, the coordination of common ground and attention in conversation has been pursued in a variety of studies (e.g. Clark and Marshall, 1981; Bruner, 1983).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  15
    No Need for Essences. On Non-Verbal Communication in First Inter-Cultural Contacts.Bart Vandenabeele - 2002 - South African Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):85-96.
    Drawing on anthropological examples of first contacts between people from different cultures, I argue that non-verbal communication plays a far bigger part in intercultural communication than has been acknowledged in the literature so far. Communication rests on mutually attuning in a large number of judgements. Some sort of structuring principle is needed at this point, and Davidson's principle of charity is a good candidate, provided sufficient attention is given to non-verbal communication. There will always be more (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  14
    Turning Speaker Meaning on its Head: Non-Verbal Communication an Intended Meanings.Marta Dynel - 2011 - Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (3):422-447.
    This article addresses the issue of non-verbal communication in the light of the Gricean conceptualisation of intentionally conveyed meanings. The first goal is to testify that non-verbal cues can be interpreted as nonnatural meanings and speaker meanings, which partake in intentional communication. Secondly, it is argued that non-verbal signals, exemplified by gestures, are similar to utterances which generate the communicator's what is said and/or conversational implicatures, together with their different subtypes and manifestations. Both of these objectives necessitate a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    Turning Speaker Meaning on its Head: Non-Verbal Communication and Intended Meanings.Marta Dynel - 2011 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 19 (3):422-447.
    This article addresses the issue of non-verbal communication in the light of the Gricean conceptualisation of intentionally conveyed meanings. The first goal is to testify that non-verbal cues can be interpreted as nonnatural meanings and speaker meanings, which partake in intentional communication. Secondly, it is argued that non-verbal signals, exemplified by gestures, are similar to utterances which generate the communicator's what is said and/or conversational implicatures, together with their different subtypes and manifestations. Both of these objectives necessitate a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  7
    Metaphorical “Networks” and Verbal Communication: A Semiotic Perspective of Human Discourse.Marcel Danesi - 2003 - Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):341-363.
    This paper presents the notion that verbal discourse is structured, in form and contents, by metaphorical reasoning. It discusses the concept of “metaphorical network” as a framework for relating the parts of a speech act to each other, since such an act seems to cohere into a meaningful text on the basis of “domains” that deliver common concepts. The basic finding of several research projects on this concept suggest that source domains allow speakers to derive sense from a verbal interaction (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  6
    The Role of Action in Verbal Communication and Shared Reality.Gerald Echterhoff - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):354 - 355.
    In examining the utility of the action view advanced in the Pickering & Garrod (P&G) target article, I first consider its contribution to the analysis of language vis-à-vis earlier language-as-action approaches. Second, I assess the relation between coordinated joint action, which serves as a blueprint for dialogue coordination, and the experience of shared reality, a key concomitant and product of interpersonal communication.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. How Do You Know When You Have Understood? Psycholinguistic Criteria for Understanding Verbal Communication.Raymond W. Gibbs - 1988 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 21 (2):201-225.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Aristotle on Verbal Communication: The First Chapters of De Interpretatione.Anita Kasabova & Vladimir Marinov - 2016 - Latest Issue of Empedocles European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 7 (2):239-253.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Aristotle on Verbal Communication: The First Chapters of De Interpretatione.Anita Kasabova & Vladimir Marinov - 2016 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 7 (2):239-253.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Aristotle on Verbal Communication: The First Chapters of De Interpretatione.Anita Kasabova & Vladimir Marinov - 2016 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 7 (2):239-253.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. The Use of a Non-Verbal Communication Device in a Diagnostic Perspective or in Clinical Research.L. Ledru & F. Lowenthal - 1988 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 21 (1):17-27.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Non-Verbal Communication. Notes on the Visual Perception of Human Relations.Jurgen Ruesch & Weldon Kees - 1958 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (3):400-401.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  49
    Is Verbal Communication a Purely Preservative Process?Anne Bezuidenhout - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):261-288.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  16.  45
    Non-Verbal Communication and Language.Michael Argyle - 1976 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 10:63-78.
  17.  1
    Mindreading and Verbal Communication.Anna Papafragou - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (1-2):55-67.
  18.  1
    Development in the Understanding of Causes of Success and Failure in Verbal Communication.E. Robinson - 1977 - Cognition 5 (4):363-378.
  19.  1
    Non-Verbal Communication and Cues in Armenian-American Literary Discourse.Mane Khachibabyan - 2017 - Wisdom 9 (2):75-91.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  16
    Non-Verbal Communication (M. L.) Catoni Schemata. Comunicazione non verbale nella Grecia antica. (Studi 2.) Pp. x + 375, ills. Pisa: Edizioni della Normale, 2005. Paper, €40. ISBN: 978-88-7642-157-. [REVIEW]Christina Clark - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):178-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Verbal Communication and Gender Discrimination: A Study From an Indian Perspective.Chaterjee Sinha Atashee - 2008 - International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 1:85-110.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Respiratory Constraints in Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication.Marcin Włodarczak & Mattias Heldner - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  4
    The Simulation of Verbal Communication Activities.J. J. Sparkes - 1976 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 10:162-173.
  24.  3
    Non-Verbal Communication. Edited by R. A. Hinde. Pp. 443. (Cambridge University Press, 1972.) Price £5·00. [REVIEW]Rom Harré - 1973 - Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (1):145-148.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    The Phenomenology of Verbal Communication: A Classical Indian View.Wimal Dissanayake - 1982 - Semiotica 41 (1-4).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Non-Verbal Communication.Rom HarrÉ - 1973 - Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (1):145.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Pragmatics, Propositional and Non-Propositional Effects: Can a Theory of Utterance Interpretation Account for Emotions in Verbal Communication?J. Moeschler - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (3):447-464.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  5
    The Effects of Verbal and Nonverbal Elements in Persuasive Communication: Findings From Two Multi-Method Experiments.Thomas Petersen, Thomas Roessing & Nikolaus Jackob - 2011 - Communications - the European Journal of Communication Research 36 (2):245-271.
    This article addresses the relationship between content, voice, and body language in persuasive communication and the contribution of these three elements of persuasive performances to its overall persuasiveness. Findings are presented from two separate laboratory experiments. In the first experiment three versions of a video displaying a speech were shown to three different groups of participants: without vocal emphasis and without gestures of the speaker, with vocal emphasis but without gestures, with vocal emphasis and gestures. Audio tracks of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. You Say "Probable" and I Say "Likely": Improving Interpersonal Communication With Verbal Probability Phrases.Tzur M. Karelitz & David V. Budescu - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (1):25-41.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  9
    A (Culture) Text is a Mechanism Constituting a System of Heterogeneous Semiotic Spaces, in Whose Continuum the Message...(Is) Circulated. We Do Not Perceive This Message to Be the Manifestation of a Single Language: A Minimum of Two Languages is Required to Create It (Lotman 1994: 377).[(1981]). The Assumption is That All Communication is Through Signs, Verbal, Visual, Movements, Performances, Rituals, Etc. Peirce's Classic Definition of the Sign is the Following:“A Sign is Something Which Stands to ... [REVIEW]Irene Portis-Winner - 1999 - Sign Systems Studies 27:24-45.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  2
    Non-Verbal Emotion Communication Training Induces Specific Changes in Brain Function and Structure.Benjamin Kreifelts, Heike Jacob, Carolin Brück, Michael Erb, Thomas Ethofer & Dirk Wildgruber - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  32.  3
    Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers.Patricia Tway - 1976 - Semiotica 16 (1).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Denotation/Connotation and Verbal/Nonverbal Communication.Luc van Poecke - 1988 - Semiotica 71 (1-2):125-152.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    The Functional Role of Neural Oscillations in Non-Verbal Emotional Communication.Ashley E. Symons, Wael El-Deredy, Michael Schwartze & Sonja A. Kotz - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  35. Observation of Communication by Physical Education Teachers: Detecting Patterns in Verbal Behavior.Abraham García-Fariña, F. Jiménez-Jiménez & M. Teresa Anguera - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  2
    Limitations on Verbal Reports of Internal Events: A Refutation of Nisbett and Wilson and of Bem.Peter White - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (1):105-112.
    Discusses R. E. Nisbett and T. D. Wilson's work on the limitations to conscious awareness of mental processes. In particular, it is suggested that their theoretical stance is not clearly formulated, that they make unwarranted assumptions about the relationship between conscious awareness and the process and the verbal report, and that their experiments do not provide information on consciousness. Some methodological recommendations are listed, and a brief report is given of some experimental findings that run counter to those of Nisbett (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37. Toward an "Awareness" of the Relationship Between Task Performance and Own Verbal Accounts of That Performance.Frank Hammonds - 2006 - Analysis of Verbal Behavior 22:101-110.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Telling More Than We Can Know: Verbal Reports on Mental Processes.Richard E. Nisbett & Timothy D. Wilson - 1977 - Psychological Review; Psychological Review 84 (3):231.
  39.  23
    Analyse et interprétation psychologiques des comportements corporels en situation de communication interpersonnelle.Loris Tamara Schiaratura - 2013 - Methodos 13 (13).
    Dans une communication interpersonnelle, l’échange se fait avec des mots mais aussi avec le corps. Les comportements corporels sont souvent considérés comme un langage dont le code est directement interprétable. Dans la plupart des cas, les comportements corporels sont codés de manière continue, probable et iconique. Il faut alors prendre en compte le processus d’inférence à la base d’une représentation de l’état de la personne qui interagit. L’article présente les outils théoriques et méthodologiques de la psychologie qui permettent d’analyser (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  5
    Pretense as Deceptive Behavioral Communication.Cristiano Castelfranchi - 2016 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 23 (1):16-52.
    Our claim in this paper is that a theory of “pretense” (in all its crucial uses in human society and cognition) can be built only if it is grounded on the general theory of “behavioral implicit communication” (BIC), which is not to be confused with non-verbal communication (with distinct notions being frequently conflated, such as “signs” vs. “messages”, or goal as “intention” vs. goal as “function”). Pretense presupposes some BIC-based human interaction, where a normal, practical behavior is used (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  70
    Imitation and Conventional Communication.Richard Moore - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  42.  7
    Dialogism in Corporate Social Responsibility Communications: Conceptualising Verbal Interaction Between Organisations and Their Audiences. [REVIEW]Niamh M. Brennan, Doris M. Merkl-Davies & Annika Beelitz - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):665-679.
    We conceptualise CSR communication as a process of reciprocal influence between organisations and their audiences. We use an illustrative case study in the form of a conflict between firms and a powerful stakeholder which is played out in a series of 20 press releases over a 2-month period to develop a framework of analysis based on insights from linguistics. It focuses on three aspects of dialogism, namely (i) turn-taking (co-operating in a conversation by responding to the other party), (ii) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  43.  21
    Enhancement VLC to Sushisen Algorithms Using BER Performance of the FSK Communication Network.P. Senthil - 2017 - International Journal of Engineering and Information Systems (IJEAIS) 1 (9):115-122.
    In this article, wide menstruates a visible light verbal exchange (VLC) system upon eight meters fair space transmission based concerning a commercial LED yet a grantee between coalition with an audio interface on a clever phone. The signal is in FSK modulation format. The profitable empirical accomplishment validates the probability regarding the proposed rule between future WI-FI communication networks.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  35
    Young Children Treat Robots as Informants.Cynthia Breazeal, Paul L. Harris, David DeSteno, Jacqueline M. Kory Westlund, Leah Dickens & Sooyeon Jeong - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):481-491.
    Children ranging from 3 to 5 years were introduced to two anthropomorphic robots that provided them with information about unfamiliar animals. Children treated the robots as interlocutors. They supplied information to the robots and retained what the robots told them. Children also treated the robots as informants from whom they could seek information. Consistent with studies of children's early sensitivity to an interlocutor's non-verbal signals, children were especially attentive and receptive to whichever robot displayed the greater non-verbal contingency. Such selective (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  77
    What Were You Thinking? A Deleuzian/Guattarian Analysis of Communication in the Mathematics Classroom.Elizabeth de Freitas - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (3):287-300.
    The primary aim of this article is to bring the work of Deleuze and Guattari to bear on the question ofcommunication in the classroom. I focus on the mathematics classroom, where agency and subjectivity are highly regulated by the rituals of the discipline, and where neoliberal psychological frameworks continue to dominate theories of teaching and learning. Moreover, the nature ofcommunication in mathematics classrooms remains highlyelusive and problematic, due in part to the distinct relationship the discipline has with verbal language and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  35
    A Language of Their Own: An Interactionist Approach to Human-Horse Communication.Keri Brandt - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (4):299-316.
    This paper explores the process of human-horse communication using ethnographic data of in-depth interviews and participant observation. Guided by symbolic interactionism, the paper argues that humans and horses co-create a language system by way of the body to facilitate the creation of shared meaning. This research challenges the privileged status of verbal language and suggests that non-verbal communication and language systems of the body have their own unique complexities. This investigation of humanhorse communication offers new possibilities to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  47.  74
    Developmental Aspects of Consciousness: How Much Theory of Mind Do You Need to Be Consciously Aware?Josef Perner & Zoltán Dienes - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):63-82.
    When do children become consciously aware of events in the world? Five possible strategies are considered for their usefulness in determining the age in question. Three of these strategies ask when children show signs of engaging in activities for which conscious awareness seems necessary in adults , and two of the strategies consider when children have the ability to have the minimal form of higher-order thought necessary for access consciousness and phenomenal consciousness, respectively. The tentative answer to the guiding question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  48.  45
    Competing Conceptions of Diagnostic Reasoning – is There a Way Out?Reidun Førde - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):59-72.
    Diagnostic errors are more frequently a result of the clinician's failure to combine medical knowledge adequately than of data inaccuracy. Diagnostic reasoning studies are valuable to understand and improve diagnostic reasoning. However, most diagnostic reasoning studies are characterized by some limitations which make these studies seem more simple than diagnostic reasoning in real life situations actually is. These limitations are connected both to the failure to acknowledge components of knowledge used in clinical practice as well as to acknowledge the physician-patient (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  49.  51
    Linguistics of Altered States of Consciousness: Problems and Prospects.D. L. Spivak - 2004 - Journal of Quantitative Linguistics 11 (1):27-32.
  50.  14
    Street Signs and Ikea Instruction Sheets: Pragmatics and Pictorial Communication.Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lombardi - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (1):133-149.
    A classical objection to pictorial communication is that pictures are intrinsically ambiguous and a picture, per se, can communicate an indeterminate number of different contents. The standard interpretation of this objection is that pictures are subordinate to language and that pictorial communication is parasitic on verbal communication. We argue that in many cases verbal communication presents a similar indeterminacy, which is resolved by resorting to pragmatic mechanisms. In this spirit, we propose a pragmatic approach which explains (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000