Results for '*Visual Contrast'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  12
    Visual Awareness of Low-Contrast Stimuli is Reflected in Event-Related Brain Potentials.Ville Ojanen, Antti Revonsuo & Mikko Sams - 2003 - Psychophysiology 40 (2):192-197.
  2.  3
    Assimilation and Contrast Effects in Visual Discrimination by Rhesus Monkeys.Martha Wilson - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):279.
  3. Parallel Processing of Color-Contrast Detectors in the Visual Cortex.P. Gouras - 1985 - In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: Wiley. pp. 242.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Maskability of Visual Targets Varying in Brightness Contrast.William N. Dember & John Chambers - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (1):51-52.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Visual Functioning in Challenging Conditions: Effects of Alcohol Consumption, Luminance, Stimulus Motion, and Glare on Contrast Sensitivity.Jeffrey T. Andre - 1996 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (3):250.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Estimating Chromatic Contrast Thresholds From the Transient Visual Evoked Potential.M. Boon & C. M. Suttle - 2004 - In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell. pp. 58-58.
  7. Visual Acuity Based on Motion Contrast: The Effect of Luminance and Luminance Contrast Reduction on Binocular and Monocular Performance.B. R. Figge & E. R. Wist - 1996 - In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. pp. 122-122.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Normal Visual Acuity and Electrophysiological Contrast Gain in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.Ludger Tebartz van Elst, Michael Bach, Julia Blessing, Andreas Riedel & Emanuel Bubl - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  9.  20
    Timing of the Earliest ERP Correlate of Visual Awareness.Maria Wilenius & Antti Revonsuo - 2007 - Psychophysiology 44 (5):703-710.
  10.  8
    Adaptation, After-Effect and Contrast in the Perception of Tilted Lines. I. Quantitative Studies.J. J. Gibson & M. Radner - 1937 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (5):453.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   44 citations  
  11.  7
    Adaptation, After-Effect, and Contrast in the Perception of Tilted Lines. II. Simultaneous Contrast and the Areal Restriction of the After-Effect. [REVIEW]J. J. Gibson - 1937 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (6):553.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  12.  34
    The Hot Fringes of Consciousness: Perceptual Fluency and Affect.Rolf Reber & Norbert Schwarz - 2001 - Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):223-231.
    High figure-ground contrast usually results in more positive evaluations of visual stimuli. This may either reflect that high figure-ground contrast per se is a desirable attribute or that this attribute facilitates fluent processing. In the latter case, the influence of high figure-ground contrast should be most pronounced under short exposure times, that is, under conditions where the facilitative influence on perceptual fluency is most pronounced. Supporting this hypothesis, ratings of the prettiness of visual stimuli increased with figure-ground (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  13.  5
    Assimilation and Contrast as Range-Frequency Effects of Anchors.Allen Parducci, Daniel S. Perrett & Herbert W. Marsh - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):281.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  16
    The Magnitude of Simultaneous Color Contrast and Simultaneous Brightness Contrast for Chimpanzee and Man.W. F. Grether - 1942 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (1):69.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Successive Contrast Involving Luminance and Purity Alterations of the Ganzfeld.Daniel J. Weintraub - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (6):555.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  6
    Compensatory Hue Shift in Simultaneous Color Contrast as a Function of Separation Between Inducing and Test Fields.Tadasu Oyama & Yun Hsia - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (3):405.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    Effects of Previously Associated Annoying Stimuli (Auditory) on Visual Recognition Thresholds.Julian Hochberg & Virginia Brooks - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):490.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    Effect of Background on Visual Acuity of Circle Grids.E. B. Greene - 1932 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):585.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Foveal Simultaneous Contrast as a Function of Inducing-Field Area.A. Leonard Diamond - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (2):144.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Effect of Intermittent Light on the Readability of Printed Matter Under Conditions of Decreasing Contrast.Siegfried J. Gerathewohl & William F. Taylor - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (4):278.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  1
    Configuration and Brightness Contrast.W. H. Mikesell & M. Bentley - 1930 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (1):1.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. The Contents of Visual Experience.Susannah Siegel - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    What do we see? We are visually conscious of colors and shapes, but are we also visually conscious of complex properties such as being John Malkovich? In this book, Susanna Siegel develops a framework for understanding the contents of visual experience, and argues that these contents involve all sorts of complex properties. Siegel starts by analyzing the notion of the contents of experience, and by arguing that theorists of all stripes should accept that experiences have contents. She then introduces a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   64 citations  
  23.  55
    How Infants Learn About the Visual World.Scott P. Johnson - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1158-1184.
    The visual world of adults consists of objects at various distances, partly occluding one another, substantial and stable across space and time. The visual world of young infants, in contrast, is often fragmented and unstable, consisting not of coherent objects but rather surfaces that move in unpredictable ways. Evidence from computational modeling and from experiments with human infants highlights three kinds of learning that contribute to infants’ knowledge of the visual world: learning via association, learning via active assembly, and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  24.  41
    Unconscious and Conscious Priming by Forms and Their Parts.Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Haluk Ogmen, Jose Ramon & Jian Chen - 2005 - Visual Cognition 12 (5):720-736.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  25.  23
    Cultural Differences in Visual Search for Geometric Figures.Yoshiyuki Ueda, Lei Chen, Jonathon Kopecky, Emily S. Cramer, Ronald A. Rensink, David E. Meyer, Shinobu Kitayama & Jun Saiki - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):286-310.
    While some studies suggest cultural differences in visual processing, others do not, possibly because the complexity of their tasks draws upon high-level factors that could obscure such effects. To control for this, we examined cultural differences in visual search for geometric figures, a relatively simple task for which the underlying mechanisms are reasonably well known. We replicated earlier results showing that North Americans had a reliable search asymmetry for line length: Search for long among short lines was faster than vice (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  18
    The Dimensionality of Visual Space.William H. Rosar - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):531-570.
    The empirical study of visual space has centered on determining its geometry, whether it is a perspective projection, flat or curved, Euclidean or non-Euclidean, whereas the topology of space consists of those properties that remain invariant under stretching but not tearing. For that reason distance is a property not preserved in topological space whereas the property of spatial order is preserved. Specifically the topological properties of dimensionality, orientability, continuity, and connectivity define “real” space as studied by physics and are the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  54
    The Relationship Between Visual Illusion and Aesthetic Preference – an Attempt to Unify Experimental Phenomenology and Empirical Aesthetics.Kaoru Noguchi - 2003 - Axiomathes 13 (3-4):261-281.
    Experimental phenomenology has demonstrated that perception is much richer than stimulus. As is seen in color perception, one and the same stimulus provides more than several modes of appearance or perceptual dimensions. Similarly, there are various perceptual dimensions in form perception. Even a simple geometrical figure inducing visual illusion gives not only perceptual impressions of size, shape, slant, depth, and orientation, but also affective or aesthetic impressions. The present study reviews our experimental phenomenological work on visual illusion and experimental aesthetics, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  21
    Designing Visual Languages for Description Logics.Brian R. Gaines - 2009 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (2):217-250.
    Semantic networks were developed in cognitive science and artificial intelligence studies as graphical knowledge representation and inference tools emulating human thought processes. Formal analysis of the representation and inference capabilities of the networks modeled them as subsets of standard first-order logic (FOL), restricted in the operations allowed in order to ensure the tractability that seemed to characterize human reasoning capabilities. The graphical network representations were modeled as providing a visual language for the logic. Sub-sets of FOL targeted on knowledge representation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Visual Search for Change: A Probe Into the Nature of Attentional Processing.R. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:345-376.
    A set of visual search experiments tested the proposal that focused attention is needed to detect change. Displays were arrays of rectangles, with the target being the item that continually changed its orientation or contrast polarity. Five aspects of performance were examined: linearity of response, processing time, capacity, selectivity, and memory trace. Detection of change was found to be a self-terminating process requiring a time that increased linearly with the number of items in the display. Capacity for orientation was (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  30.  28
    Can Blindsight Be Superior to 'Sighted-Sight?'.Ceri T. Trevethan, Arash Sahraie & Larry Weiskrantz - 2007 - Cognition 103 (3):491-501.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31. The Visual Experience of Causation.Susanna Siegel - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):519-540.
    In this paper I argue that causal relations between objects are represented in visual experience, and contrast my argument and its conclusion with Michotte's results from the 1960's.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  32. Recent Issues in High-Level Perception.Grace Helton - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):851-862.
    Recently, several theorists have proposed that we can perceive a range of high-level features, including natural kind features (e.g., being a lemur), artifactual features (e.g., being a mandolin), and the emotional features of others (e.g., being surprised). I clarify the claim that we perceive high-level features and suggest one overlooked reason this claim matters: it would dramatically expand the range of actions perception-based theories of action might explain. I then describe the influential phenomenal contrast method of arguing for high-level (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33.  12
    The Perception of Visual Emotion: Comparing Different Measures of Awareness.Remigiusz Szczepanowski, Jakub Traczyk, Michał Wierzchoń & Axel Cleeremans - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):212-220.
    Here, we explore the sensitivity of different awareness scales in revealing conscious reports on visual emotion perception. Participants were exposed to a backward masking task involving fearful faces and asked to rate their conscious awareness in perceiving emotion in facial expression using three different subjective measures: confidence ratings , with the conventional taxonomy of certainty, the perceptual awareness scale , through which participants categorize “raw” visual experience, and post-decision wagering , which involves economic categorization. Our results show that the CR (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  34. Toward a Theory of Visual Consciousness.Semir Zeki & Andreas Bartels - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):225-59.
    The visual brain consists of several parallel, functionally specialized processing systems, each having several stages (nodes) which terminate their tasks at different times; consequently, simultaneously presented attributes are perceived at the same time if processed at the same node and at different times if processed by different nodes. Clinical evidence shows that these processing systems can act fairly autonomously. Damage restricted to one system compromises specifically the perception of the attribute that that system is specialized for; damage to a given (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  35. Effects of Saturation and Contrast Polarity on the Figure-Ground Organization of Color on Gray.Birgitta Dresp-Langley & Adam Reeves - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-9.
    Poorly saturated colors are closer to a pure grey than strongly saturated ones and, therefore, appear less “colorful”. Color saturation is effectively manipulated in the visual arts for balancing conflicting sensations and moods and for inducing the perception of relative distance in the pictorial plane. While perceptual science has proven quite clearly that the luminance contrast of any hue acts as a self-sufficient cue to relative depth in visual images, the role of color saturation in such figure-ground organization has (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  19
    Low-Level Phenomenal Vision Despite Unilateral Destruction of Primary Visual Cortex.Petra Stoerig & E. Barth - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):574-587.
    GY, an extensively studied human hemianope, is aware of salient visual events in his cortically blind field but does not call this ''vision.'' To learn whether he has low-level conscious visual sensations or whether instead he has gained conscious knowledge about, or access to, visual information that does not produce a conscious phenomenal sensation, we attempted to image process a stimulus s presented to the impaired field so that when the transformed stimulus T(s) was presented to the normal hemifield it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  37. Another Look at the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis: The Argument From Illusion Studies.Robert Briscoe - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):35-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend what I call the action-oriented coding theory (ACT) of spatially contentful visual experience. Integral to ACT is the view that conscious visual experience and visually guided action make use of a common subject-relative or 'egocentric' frame of reference. Proponents of the influential two visual systems hypothesis (TVSH), however, have maintained on empirical grounds that this view is false (Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006; Clark, 1999; 2001; Campbell, 2002; Jacob & Jeannerod, 2003; Goodale & (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38. Color, Mental Location, and the Visual Field.David M. Rosenthal - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):85-93.
    Color subjectivism is the view that color properties are mental properties of our visual sensations, perhaps identical with properties of neural states, and that nothing except visual sensations and other mental states exhibits color properties. Color phys- icalism, by contrast, holds that colors are exclusively properties of visible physical objects and processes.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39. On the Development of the Two Visual Systems.John van der Kamp & Geert J. P. Savelsbergh - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):120-120.
    Norman's reconciliation of the two theories of perception is challenged because it directly leads to the nature-nurture dichotomy in the development of the two visual systems. In contrast, the proposition of a separate development of the two visual systems may be better understood as involving different types of information that follow a distinct temporal sequence.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  11
    Availability of Alternatives and the Processing of Scalar Implicatures: A Visual World Eye‐Tracking Study.Judith Degen & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):172-201.
    Two visual world experiments investigated the processing of the implicature associated with some using a “gumball paradigm.” On each trial, participants saw an image of a gumball machine with an upper chamber with orange and blue gumballs and an empty lower chamber. Gumballs dropped to the lower chamber, creating a contrast between a partitioned set of gumballs of one color and an unpartitioned set of the other. Participants then evaluated spoken statements, such as “You got some of the blue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  14
    Innateness and (Bayesian) Visual Perception.Brian J. Scholl - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 34.
    This chapter explores a way in which visual processing may involve innate constraints and attempts to show how such processing overcomes one enduring challenge to nativism. In particular, many challenges to nativist theories in other areas of cognitive psychology have focused on the later development of such abilities, and have argued that such development is in conflict with innate origins. Innateness, in these contexts, is seen as antidevelopmental, associated instead with static processes and principles. In contrast, certain perceptual models (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  1
    How Do Attention and Adaptation Affect Contrast Sensitivity?Franco Pestilli, Gerardo Viera & Marisa Carrasco - 2007 - Journal of Vision 7 (9).
    Attention and adaptation are both mechanisms that optimize visual performance. Attention optimizes performance by increasing contrast sensitivity for and neural response to attended stimuli while decreasing them for unattended stimuli; adaptation optimizes performance by increasing contrast sensitivity for and neural response to changing stimuli while decreasing them for unchanging stimuli. We investigated whether and how the adaptation state and the attentional effect on contrast sensitivity interact. We measured contrast sensitivity with an orientation-discrimination task, in two adaptation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  3
    Context-Dependent Brightness Priming Occurs Without Visual Awareness.Marjan Persuh & Tony Ro - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):177-185.
    Our visual systems account for stimulus context in brightness perception, but whether such adjustments occur for stimuli that we are unaware of has not been established. We therefore assessed whether stimulus context influences brightness processing by measuring unconscious priming with metacontrast masking. When a middle-gray disk was presented on a darker background, such that it could be consciously perceived as brighter via simultaneous brightness contrast , reaction times were significantly faster to a bright annulus than to a dark annulus. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  25
    Candide Shoots the Monkey Lovers: Representing Black Men in Eighteenth-Century French Visual Culture.M. L. Bellhouse - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (6):741-784.
    This essay analyzes a shift in racialized regimes of visual signification in French metropolitan culture during the long eighteenth century. The author explores two symbolically central figures—the dismembered black slave and the black rapist/lover who is “duly punished”—by undertaking an intertextual reading of two sets of illustrations of Voltaire's Candide designed by Moreau le Jeune. Separated by the French and Haitian Revolutions, Moreau's two sets of Candide illustrations register an important shift in the French cultural imaginary. The figure of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  7
    Colors and Stuff: Exploring the Visual Representation of Color.Richard Montgomery - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):1283-1298.
    It is standard to suppose that, whether or not they are actually instantiated in our environment, colors are properties. Presumably those who are convinced of this thesis are convinced because they think that’s how we see colors--how visual experience represents them. I argue, in contrast, that there are cases of illusory color perception in which it is more plausible to suppose colors are represented as kinds of stuff or substance rather than as properties. I then show how to extend (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  22
    Apparent Distortions in Photography and the Geometry of Visual Space.Robert French - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):523-529.
    In this paper I contrast the geometric structure of phenomenal visual space with that of photographic images. I argue that topologically both are two-dimensional and that both involve central projections of scenes being depicted. However, I also argue that the metric structures of the spaces differ inasmuch as two types of “apparent distortions”—marginal distortion in wide-angle photography and close-up distortions—which occur in photography do not occur in the corresponding visual experiences. In particular, I argue that the absence of marginal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Imagining Foucault. On the Digital Subject and "Visual Citizenship".Susanne Krasmann - 2017 - Foucault Studies 23:10-26.
    One of the most exciting features in Foucault’s work is his analytics of power in terms of forms of visibility. It allows for a reflection on the conditions of seeing and thinking, thus triggering a seemingly paradoxical move: locating the limits of our perspectives entails simultaneously transgressing these limits. In a way, we decipher our own blind spot. Approaching Discipline and Punish through this perspective brings us to identify the digital subject as a characteristic figure of our time. In (...) to its disciplinarian counterpart, it appears to be an active, though not necessarily political subject. The notion of visual citizenship will help us to go a step further and figure out what it could mean to challenge today’s surveilling gaze. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  45
    Intrinsic Perspectives, Object Feature Binding, and Visual Consciousness.Eric LaRock - 2007 - Theory and Psychology 17 (6):799-09.
    I argue that Van der Velde and I agree on two fundamental issues surrounding the vision-related binding problem and recent solutions that have been offered: (1) that tagging theories fail to account for object feature binding in visual consciousness and (2) that feedforward-feedback processes in the visual cortical hierarchy play a role in generating a feature-unified object of visual consciousness. Van der Velde develops and discusses an important objection to tagging theories that could help to strengthen my critique of neuronal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  1
    Two Visual Systems in Molyneux Subjects.Ferretti Gabriele - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-37.
    Molyneux’s question famously asks about whether a newly sighted subject might immediately recognize, by sight alone, shapes that were already familiar to her from a tactile point of view. This paper addresses three crucial points concerning this puzzle. First, the presence of two different questions: the classic one concerning visual recognition and another one concerning vision-for-action. Second, the explicit distinction, reported in the literature, between ocular and cortical blindness. Third, the importance of making reference to our best neuroscientific account on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  1
    Mid-Range Action-Driving Visual Information.David Bennett & Patrick Foo - 2010 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 16 (2):98-116.
    Milner and Goodale have advanced a justly influential theory of the structure of the human visual system. In broad outline, Milner and Goodale hold that the ventral neural pathway is associated with recognition and experiential awareness, and with a kind of indirect control of action. And they hold that, by contrast, the dorsal neural stream is associated with the non-conscious, direct control of visually informed action. Most of the relevant empirical research has focused on the visual control of close-in, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000